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March 29, 1969 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-03-29

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, March 29, 1 9EC",

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, March 29, 1969

5

A MODERN HERO'

DAILY OFFICIAL

Ike:
If this nation as a whole can

be said to have any
heroes, Dwight David
hower must certainly
among them.

modern
Eisen-
r a n k

As a soldier, Eisenhower's life
symbolized the bitter and bloody
struggle of this nation in the
two most terrible wars mankind
has ever brought upon itself.
As a president, it was 'his
sirmple and honest character,
bred straight from a Kansas
farm, that endeared him to the
people - to that bastion of
middle-class Americans living
in small towns, on farms, the
young families in the growing
suburbs, and the aging soldiers
clinging to the general's image
as the last living remnant of the
glory they themselves once held.
Charles DeGaulle, who looked
down his nose at every Amer-

Symbol
ican president he ever knew ex-
cept John Kennedy, once said
of the old general, "I am told
that on the golf course Eisen-
hower is much better on the
putting green than with the
long shots. This does not sur-
prise me."
The analogy is + Eisen-
hower was never a man ;: ia
of debate. of fine words and
idealized plans for the future.
As president. he was not even a
skillful administrator. What
Eisenhower was, however, and
perhaps this is most important
of all, was an ideal symbol of
security and the American
dream to a war-weary nation
needing that more than any-
thing else.
Often an American president
is more historically significant
for what he represents than for

Gen. Dwight David Eisenhower

ofCsec
what he does. Such a president
was Eisenhower, who led the
country through eight year's of
domestic tranquility and respite
from war despite administrative
bungling in the White House.
He has been ridiculed for the
1957 budget fiasco with -Treas-
urer Humphrey. In the White
House, he was often the last to
learn abo+ imr-r+o-t n+-
istrative decisions made by his
understaff and the various fed-
eral agencies. He was slow to
react to the crisis in civil rights
that arose during his years in
office.
He was, nevertheless, a great
American, if by that we mean
a man who was loved and re-
vered by his people.
Rising from an obscure Army
post in the post-World War I
years, Eisenhower was chosen by
Franklin Roosevelt to lead the
Allied invasion of North Africa.
His African campaign was
brilliant. In a single year, North
Africa was destroyed as an Axis
p o w e r and Rommel's once-
dreaded African Corps was fi-
nally defeated. Before becoming
supr e m e commander. Eisen-
hower conquered Sicily and
squeezed fascist Italy out of the
war.
Eisenhower rose to the mii-
tary summit in late 1943. As
supreme commander of the al-
lied forces in Europe, he led
the mighties armed force ever
assembled. On an overcast June
day in 1944, Eisenhower gave
the signal to begin the invasion
of Normandy. Eleven months
later, Nazi Germany surrender-
ed unconditionally.
The erstwhile Kansas farm
boy was lionized in Britain as
a genius or warfare and wel-
comed home by cheering crowds
in New York as the exemplar
of the fighting man.
' Yet Eisenhower hated "this
damnable thing of war," and
said he wanted to see "people
in my profession permanently
out of a job."
In 1948, Eisenhower became
president of Columbia Univer-
sity, leaving to assume com-
mand of NATO forces in 1950.
Before the political conventions
in the summer of 1952, Demo-
crats as well as Republicans
sought him as their nominee.
His la'ndslide victory in 1.956
for re-election made him the or'-

ly Republican president of this
century to win successive terms
in the White House.
Leaving office after his sec-
ond term, Eisenhower was one
of the first to warn against the
growing influence of a "milita.y-
industrial complex."
The fact that the same col-
lege campus over which the gen-
eral presided for two years
erupted into revolution last year
is indicative of the change in
mood this country-and espe-
cially the youth of this country
-has undergone since Eisen-
hower stepped down from paiv. *
It would be wrong for the
youth of today to idolize Eisen-
hower, for he represents the
warlike mentality of a genera-
tion soon to pass into oblivion,
But at the same time we can
revere and respect him as an
individual who never wavered
from the most sincere devotion
to his country.
He shall be mourned.
-DAVID SPURR

uriyl

BULLETIN

Doctoral Exams
Fdward Charles Hansen. Anthropol-
og-. Dis itatmion: "PoliticalImensions
of Social Chanige in Rural Catalonlai
iSpain},." on Satutrdlay.;March 29 at
10:00 a.m. in Room K215 Lloyd House,
Vest Quad, Chairman: J. E. K. Smith.
Phi aeneii I
(;ENERA fDIVISIOlN

Michigan Academy of Science. Arts 3200 s.A.8.
and Letters: £'usiness Meeting, E a s t Peace Corps Week: March 31 - April 4.
Lecture Room, Rackham, 8:30 a.m. Heaiquarters in room 3529 S.AB, third
Technirama 1969: College of En- floor, 9 a.mn. - 5 p.m. No appointments
4neering Open House: exhibits, de- necessary. stop in and discuss the cur-
monstrations and seminars in En- rent programs and your qualifications
,meeting. Central and North Campus for volunteer service. Speakers are
racilities open. _Guided tours and looproups inteesteai Pace
)u= service supplied. 9:00 a.mn. - 6:00 Corps, any campus group may call Miss
p.m. Webber. 764-7460, to leave their request
for speakers. The P.C. team will contact
American Studies Association of the organization early next week.
Michigan and Michigan Academy Lec- -
tures: "Black/White History in Amer- Current Position openings received by
Ica": Multipurpose Room, Undergrad- General Division. by mail and phone,
uate Library. 9:30 a.m. and "A Program not interviews, please call 764-7460 for
of BlackffWhite Movies and Music": application details.
Multipurpose Room, Undergraduate Li- Local Organization, Ann Arbor,
brary, 2:00 p.m. Mich.: Programmers, both full t i m e
Degree Recital: Allen Kindt, piano: perm., and full time summer open-
School of Music Recital Hall, 2:30 p.m. ins, traveling in tri-state area a few
daysa week. math degree and exper.
Professional Theatre Program: Shake- needed for small firm involved in sys-
spear's Hamlet: Lydia Mendelssohn tems for materials handling.
Theater, 2:30 and 8:00 p.m. Universal Looseleaf, Benton Harbor,
Cinema Guild: Nothing But A M'~an. Mich.: Selling careers for persons tak-
Architecture Auditorium, 7:00 and 9:05 ing their second job perhaps, interest
p.m. in sales or marketing, locations at all
officers.
Degree Recital: William Rowe, piano; aer Brothers, Inc., Lansing,
School of Music Recital Hall, 8:30 p.m. Mich.: Civil Engineer, watertreatment
Men's Glee Club: "White Tie and and PERT exper., to work into esti-
Tails", Philip Duey, director, Hill Aud- mating operations, BSE in CE and min.
- itorium, 8:30 p.m. 1 year exper. in some area of CE.

9

SUNDAY, MARCH 29
Pa C(alendar

A

,
I

TONIGHT AT 1:15 PM.-Hillel Student Services

. J

JEWISH MUSIC FESTIVAL
PART I: SATURDAY, MARCH 29-8:30 P.M.
ISRAELI-YIDDISH CAFE NIGHT

0 Folk Songs 9

0 Dancers 9

* Israeli Food *

PART II: SUNDAY, MARCH 30-2:30 P.M.
2 SEMINARS

tj

" "Chanters, Cantors, & Composers," led by
John Planer
" "The State of Jewish Folk Music in Israel," led by
Done Harwood
MUSICALE (classical style)

a

Ike and Winston Churchill map war strategy

4HILLE

mmmm.

L FOUNDATION

663-4129

1429 HILL ST.

WORSHIP

of

-Photos b
Join 1
CIRCULA
Come in
and<
420
Subs
THE MICH
Phone

Ike and President Kennedy twenty years later
y Associated Press-
MICHIGANENS IAIN
he Daily Junior Staff Selected
TION DEPTACADEMICS EDITOR-
Bruce Kaplan
ASSOCIATE ACADEMICS EDITOR-
any afternoon Cathy Garnett
ask for J.B.
ARTS EDITOR-
Maynard Sue Rosenblot
-_ASSOCIATE ARTS EDITOR-
Leah Shiner
To CAMPUS LIFE EDITOR-
c:ribeTo Beth U rdang
ASSOCIATE CAMPUS LIFE EDITOR-
fl lGAN AILYSue Fishbein
ORGANIZATIONS EDITOR-
764 5 Garry Grossman
--ASSOCIATE ORGANIZATIONS EDITOR-
Susan Gingrich
PUBLICITY DIRECTOR-
Mel Miller
e.kte Formal SALES MANAGER-
Larry Hurlburt
r1 Servkce ASSOCIATE SALES MANAGER-

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH AND WESLEY
FOUNDATION
At State and Huron Streets
Church-662-4536
Weslev-668-6881
Hoover Rupert, Minister
Bartlett Beavin, Campus Minister
Interim Associate, William B. Lutz
SUNDAY
9:00 a.m. and 11:15 a.m.-"TRIUMPH-God
Wins"-Dr. Hoover Rupert
6:00 p.m.-Supper, Pine Room
7:00 p.m.-Program, "God as Creative Pro-.
cess" with Rev. Lloyd Putnam of the Uni-
versity Ofice of Religious Affairs
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.---Holy Communion, Chapel
7:30 a.m.--Breakfast, Pine Room
SATURDAY
7:30 p.m.--Egg blowing and decorating party
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:30 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. Services,
Sunday at 11:00 a.m. Communion
Sunday at 6:00 p.m. Gamma Delta.,
Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. Holy Week Service,
with Communion
Thursday at 7:30 p.m. Maundy Thursday,
Communion ServiceI
Friday at 7:25 a.m. Good Friday. Matins
Friday at 1:00 p.m. Good Friday Service

UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
1001 East Huron
Phone 662-3153
Minister: Calvin S. Malefyt
10:30 a.m.-Rev. Calvin S. Malefyt-"The
Holy Spirit as Change Agent"
5:00 p.m.-Folk Worship.
7:00 p.m.-"The Sign of Jonah" Religious
Drama presented by Hope College Theatre
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W Stadium at Edgewood
Across from Ann Arbor High
John M. Hamilton, Minister
SUNDAY
10:00 a.m.-Bible School.
1 1:00 a.m.-Regular Worship.
6.00 p.m.-Evening Worship.
WEDNESDAY
7:30 p.m.-Bible Study.
Transportation furnished for all services-Call
NO 2-2756.
NORTHSIDE PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
1679 Broadway (at Baits Drive)
Rev. William S. Baker, pastor 663-2969
Only 3 minute walk from Bursley Hall
10:00 a.m -Forum (discussion group)
(unconventional building shored with St.
Aiden's Episcopal)

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Phone 662-4466
, SUNDAY
Worship at 9:30 and 10:30 a.m.-Preaching
The Rev. John R. Waser, Associate Minis-
ter (of the A.A. First Pres. Church)
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHjURCH
306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
9:00 a.m.-Holy Communion and Sermon.
11 :00 a.m -Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 p.m.-Evening Prayer.
ST. AIDAN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
1679 Broadway
(atBaits Drive--North Campus)
SUNDAY
11:00 a.m.-Pglm Sunday Drama and Holy
Communion
MONDAY through THURSDAY
7:30 p.m.-Hgly Communion
FRIDAY
12:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m.-Good Friday
CANTERBURY HOUSE
330 Maynard
11:00 a.m.-Holy Communion. Sermon: "The
Parable"
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
A L.C.-L.C.A.
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Donald G. Zill, Pastor
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m.-Seminar "Biblical Study: A New
Approach"
9:30 a.m.-Matins
11:00 a.m.-Folk-Rock "Mass of a Pilgrim
People." (Holy Communion) Sermon: "Our
Choice: Crucifixion or Suicide."
2:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.-"Journey to the
City
THURSDAY
7:15 p.m-Holy Communion
FRIDAY

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Ave.
Dr. Erwin A. Goede, Minister
Church School and Service at 10:30 am. -
"Music in the Unitarian Church." The
Choir.
Student Religious Liberals at 7:00 p.m.
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave.
Telephone 665-6149
Pastors: H. G Kroehler, A. C. Bizer,
W. C-. Wright
9:30 and 10:45 a.m.-Worship Service.
9:30 and 10:45 a.m.-Church School.

CAMPUS CHAPEL
1 236 Washtenaw
Donald Postema, Minister
10:00 a.m.-Morning Worship. "The King"
11:00 o.m.-Coffee
6:00 p.m.-Special Palm Sundav Service.
Film: 'It's About This Carpenter"
7 :1 5 p.m.--Classical Guitar Concert
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
On the Campus-
Corner State and William Sts.
Terry N. Smith, Minister
Ronald C. Phillips, Assistant
9:15 and 11:00 a.m.-Sermon: "Where Is
He?" Rev. Terry N. Smith preaching
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
SUNDAY

0i

Compl
Rentc

7:15 p.m.-Vespers and Tenebrae
SATURDAY
11:30 p m.-Easter Vigil. First Easter Com-
munion.
HURON iHi5ILLS BAPTIST CHURCH

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