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March 29, 1969 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-03-29

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the emu players series presents
AN
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madcap french farce with music
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114C

AW4 icl igttn

Datlj

second front page

Saturday, March 29, 1969

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page Three

I

TONIGHT
$1.00
ANDY'
COHEN

1421 Hill St.
8:30 P.M.

I

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
BIG FOUR TALKS ON THE MIDEAST are scheduled to
begin at the United Nations next Thursday, diplomatic sources
said yesterday.
Informants said the ambassadors of the Soviet Union, the
United States, Britain and France will meet at the French U.N.
mission to discuss possible ways of ending the Mideast conflict.
France proposed the Big Four talks on Jan. 16 and preliminary,
bilateral talks between the nations involved have been going since
Feb. 11.
In the Security Council the French and British ambassadors de-
nounced an Israeli air raid that killed 18 people Wednesday in the Jor-
danian village of Ein Hazar. They 'also urged support for the big-
power efforts to bring peace to the area.
THE JUSTICE DEPARTMENT asked a federal court yester-
day to declare residential "blockbusting" illegal.
The request was contained in an unprecedented "friend of the
court"' petition filed in support of a suit brought by a group of black
homeowners in Chicago.
"Blockbusting" jis the process of creating panic in white neigh-
borhoods by selling homes to blacks. Other homes are purchased for
much less than actual value and resold to other blacks at inflated
prices.
The Justice Department based its argument on the 1866 Civil
Rights law and the antislavery 13th Amendment. Offtcials said the
petition was the first of a series of moves planned against housing
segregation in the North.
U.S. INFANTRY UNITS in South Vietnam crushed an at-
tempted North Vietnamese ambush yesterday killing 46 enemy
soldiers.
The day-long engagement broke out in the Ben Cui rubber plan-
tation, 45 miles northwest of Saigon. U.S. casualties were repot-ted
as three killed, six wounded.
Forty tanks and armored personnel carriers were escorting a
convoy of 120 trucks carrying ammunition and food to a base at
Tay Ninh when the attack began.

WASHINGTON (4) - Gen.
David M. Shoup; former Marine
Corps commandant, says "an
aggressive military" encour-
aged the Johnson administra-
tion to wage war in Vietnam in
1964 and abandon long-stand-
ing opposition to involvement in
an Asian land conflict.
Shoup, as head of the Ma-
rines, was a member of the
Joint Chiefs of Staff for four
years before that date, retiring
in December 1963. He since has
been a critic of the U.S. role in
Vietnam.
Writing for the March 27 issue
of Atlantic Monthly, Shoup por-
trayed "belligerent," "g 1 o r y
seeking" military leaders who
succeeded him as competing
with one another to have their
services play big roles in Viet-
nam.
"In Vietnam during 1965," he
said, "the four services were
racing to build up combat
strength in that hapless coun-
try."
Indicative of this eagerness,

BEHIND WAR ESCALATION:

Shoup hits 'aggressive military'

Shoup said, was the Navy's and
Air Force's competitive attitude
in the bombing of North Viet-
nam.
"The punitive air strikes im-
mediately following the Tonkin
Gulf incident in late 1964 re-
vealed the readiness of naval
air forces to bomb North Viet-
nam," Shoup said, adding par-
enthetically:
"It now appears that the
Navy actually had attack plans
ready even before the alleged
incident took place."
The Johnson administration
ordered the first air strikes
against North Vietnam after the
Tonkin Gulf encounter, saying
North Vietnamese gunboats had
attacked U.S. vessels in the
area.
Shoup decried the U.S. bomb-
ing campaign as "one of the
most wasteful and expensive
hoaxes ever to' be put over on
the American people."
By early 1965, he said, the
Navy and Air Force were caught
up in a bombing "contest" over

the North, reporting "mislead-
ing data or propaganda to serve
Air Force and Navy purposes.="
Shoup said the Army and Ma-
rines "played a similar game"
trying to outdo each other get-
ting troops into Vietnam.
"Top ranking Army officers,"
Shop said, wanted to commit
forces for a variety of reasons,
among them" to test plans and
new equipment, to test the new
air mobile theories and tactics,
to try the tactics and techniques
of counter insurgency and to
gain combat experience for
young officers and non-com-
missioned officers.
"The Marines had similar mo-
tivations, the least of which was
any real concern about the polit-
ical or social problems of the
Vietnamese people," S h o u p
wrote. "In early 1965 there was
a shooting war going on and the
Marines were being left out of
it, contrary to all their tradi-
tions."
"So Marine planners were
seeking an acceptable excuse to

thrust a landing force over the
beaches of Vietnam when the
Viet Cong attacked the U.S.
Army special forces camp at
Pleiku in February 1965," Shoup
recounted. '"It was considered
unacceptable aggression and
the President was thereby
prompted to put U.S. ground
combat units into the war."
In addition to Vietnam he cit-
ed U.S. intervention in the Do-
minican Republic in 1965 in
which the military's "contigen-
cy plans and interservice rival-
ry appeared to supersede diplo-
macy.
"Before the world realized
what was happening, the mo-
mentum and velocity of the mil-
itary plans propelled almost
20,000 U.S. soldiers and Marines
into the small turbulent republic
in an impressive race to test the
respective mobility of the Army
and the Marines," Shoup said.
"A small 1935-model Marine
landing force could probably
have handled the situation."

BLUES

HARD DRIVING
PIANO
and
GUITAR

Sat. nite tate-AFTER HOURS (50c)

t4AtlNAL S OERAi.CORPORATION
FOX EASTERN THATRES G'
FOX VILfl5
375 No. MAPLE R , "7691300

NOW SHOWING
MON. THRU FRI. 7:00-9:00
SAT.-SUN. 1:00-3:00-5:00-7:00-9:00

Court gives
rent strikers
possession
(Continued from Page 1)

ED SCHOOL TEACH-IN:
Kohl discusses experimental
'Store Front' school program

COLUMBIA PICTURES
DresfV .
AN IRVING ALLEN
sveduttI, .
Dean Mart

-
...and the demolition
is delicious)

I 1

i

The various apartment dwellings

U.S. forces used helicopter gunships, fighter bombers, and the in Ann Arbor are supposed to be
tanks to drive off the North Vietnamese. inspected every two years under
* * city ordinance. However, the last

"Matt Helmi
5MtfTeWrcigCrew
THEATRE CLEARED AFTER 7 P.M. SHOW Ri.-SAT.
HELD OVER 4th WEEK

s
G EETINGS must be one of the
first movies to take the graffiti gen-
eration for granted. Up to now, we
rhave had speechless awe, mystifica-
tion and propaganda all banging
away dismally at the same time.
Now, at last, this generation is treat-
ed simply as what's there, not as
some blessed state of transcendence,
and in a spirit of good feckless gusto
a little reminiscent of PULL MY
DAISY and the Beats.
The absence of self-congratulation
is especially bracing. The three
young men around whom the film
jerkily turns are just as low-down
and dirty as their elderrs, only a
little less bashfulrabout it Their
attempts to dodge the draftare as
absuri as the draft itself. Never
mind the holiness of their cause-
they are willing to wear women's
underwear, lisp, break their legs,
anything to keep out of uniform.
They do not reject America, they
try to outwit it. And, more often,
it outwits them. They are constantly
being, surprised, as neophytes should
be, by furtive pornographers, Bronx
secretaries, sex mystics, and their
own base appetites and constantly
bouncing back like hard rubber.
Beyond that, their basic style is
parody. They take the ponderous
mumbo jumbo of, for instance, the
Kennedy-assassination theorists and
run screaming down the hall with

WANT
YOU
to read this:
it. Likewise, the cult of photography
which has made the Vietnam war
into a peepshow and the sex act
into a lab slide is treated with a
wild-eyed derision. The things that
adults take seriously become comic
dances, festival masques. This is
their America, they know no other,
but they have turned it into a play-
ground, using the same materials we
use for our funeral parlor.
GREETINGS rings true partly be-
cause it does have links with the
past. There is a nostalgia about it.
like good schoolboy fiction, even for
those of us who came of age in the
glum, knees-together postwar years.
They act where we talked, they talk
where we just thought. They are not
some electronic concoctions, but col-
lege students whose scurviness has
evol~ved to meet new challenges-
and, of course, lose to them.
GREETINGS does not convey its
exuberance with a bobbing camera
and a garbled soundtrack. Brian de
Palma and Charles Hirsch have made
a solid, professional film of it, with
obvious debts to Richard Lester, et
al, but some good touches of their
own. I had been coming to feel that
any allusion in film to'the Vietna-
mese mess was a sure mark of char-
latanism; but this combination of
TV war and draftee's nightmare is
a whole fresh contribution to inter-
national strain.

SEN. EDWARD M. KENNEDY (D-Mass.) criticized two Nixon
administration officials yesterday for laxness in enforcing equal
opportunity programs.
Kennedy, at a hearing of the Senate subcommittee on govern-
ment operations, questioned actions taken by Secretary of Transporta-
tion John A. Volpe and Deputy Secretary of Defense David R. Pack-
ard.
Kennedy, the chairman of the subcommittee, took Packard to
task for awarding $9.4 million in contracts to three previously dis-
criminatory textile films on the basis of oral, rather than written,
assurances that they would comply with anti-bias requirements.
Kennedy said a recent order by Volpe to strengthen equal em-
ployment opportunities in highway projects was inadequate bebause
contractors could shift blacks from one job to another in order to
comply.
u
POPE PAUL VI named four Americans to be cardinals of the
Roman Catholic Church yesterday.
The new cardinals are Archbishops Terence Cooke of New York,
John Dearden of Detroit, John Wright of Pittsburgh and John Car-
berry of St. Louis.
The four will be among 33 new cardinals to be elevated at a secret
consistory in RomeApril 28. The Sacred College will reach an all-time
high of 134 members.
The Vatican announcement also brings American representation
to a record ten cardinals.
A PSYCHIATRIST yesterday testified that Sirhan Sirhan
was "motivated by political reasons" to kill Sen. Robert F. Ken-
nedy.;
Dr. Seymour Pollack said Sirhan has a paranoid personality
but that highly charged political reasons were Sirhan's main motiva-
tion. Pollack said that Sirhan's early life in the war-torn Mideast
had a considerable effect of his personality.
Pollack said he could find no evidence of intermittent trances in
Sirhan's early life. The defense claims Sirhan was in such a trance
when he shot Kennedy.
Earlier, a handwriting expert testified that Sirhan's self-exhorta-
tions to kill Kennedy were not made under hypnosis. The writings
were found in a notebook of Sirhan's.
Three Los Angeles policemen also testified that Sirhan appeared
sober after his arrest on June 5. The defense had claimed that Sirhan
was intoxicated when he killed Kennedy.
The testimony came as the prosecution began its rebuttal of
defense claims.

inspection of 549 Packard took
place in 1966. Naomi Karow said
she' had called Lloyd to run an
inspection of the premises this.
year.
The furnace has since been dry-
walled and two new garbage cans
were put on the premises. A new
certificate of compliance was is-
sued March 26, 1969.
A charge was also made that
Kloian had turned off the heat
in the building in February. How-
ever he denied this.
The Karows testified that the
heat had gone off several times
throughout the past months. But
this time the two entrances to the
basement were both locked from
the inside and the tenants could
not gain entrance to the furnace
room.
After gaining entrance tothe
furnace room by breaking a win-
dow, it was discovered that the
furnace was not working.
The Karows opened an account
with Abbott Oil to get some oil
in the furnace. It is the amount of
this oil that was subtracted from
the original two months' rent.
Another claim mde by the Kar-
ows was that their car had been
towed away at the request of
Kloian. It had been parked in a
neighboring lot which Kloian also
owns, but Kloian said that the
Karows never received permission,
to park the car on the premises..
Dale Berry, Grad, a member of
the rent strike steering commit-
tee, said "this is the third favor-
able decision received by the
tenants." He also indicated that
they are looking for similar results
on the upcoming case of Arbor
Management versus Elizabeth
Hertz.

Pharmacy -division
produces new drugs

By SAM DAMREN
"We are all victims of the
institution we want to change, and
we have to change ourself as we
change the society," said Herbert
Kohl, a guest panelist at an edu-
cation school teach-in yesterday.
The teach-in is part of a semi-
nar sponsored by Students for,
Educational Innovation (SEDand
the education school. The semi-
nar's stated concern is Problems'
and Strategies for Change in
American Education.
Last night Kohl, author and
former teacher in a New York
ghetto school, discussed his cur-
rent proj ect-the Store Front-a
"free education school" in Berke-
ley, Calif., funded by Carnegie
Institute.
The school is staffed by Univer-

sity of California students who
volunteer as teachers, and has a
current enrollment of 200 students
of all ages.
Students attend the Store Front
either as a supplement to their
current schooling or full time,
seven days a week.
Full time enrollment was orig-
inally limited to "trouble makers"
in the school system. "Now kids
get themselves kicked out of
school," says Kohl, "to become
enrolled in the Store."
Next year the project expects
to expand an old factory into a
school house with the help of the
students and faculty.
Kohl said the school has an un-
structed curriculum, and "every
structure is introduced by the stu-

(Continued from Page 1)
patient regarding the patient's
previous drug history and any
possible conflicts with previously
administered drugs orallergic re-
actions, Phillipsadds.
Another feature is more direct
contact and consultation between
the pharmacist and the physician
in prescribing drugs.
All this work is being done in
the half million dollar facilities of
the hospital pharmacy depart-
ment.
The pharmacy division of the
facility produces and distributes
medications to in- and out-pa-
tients. The medications include
ointments, tablets, capsules, lo-
tions, and elixirs.
The division also tests new
drugs. Tests are run on both large
and small animals for toxicity and

effectiveness before being given
to human volunteers. Drugs are
eventually released to the com-
mercial market if the human tests
prove successful.
The assay and control division
aids in determining the potency of
drugs. Medications are protected
from contamination before tests
by a special air filter. Air passes
through a hood filter, where it is
purified, to the shelves where.
medications are stored.
Despitesuch advanced equip-
ment, the future promises to bring
further innovations. Phillips says
use of data processing equipment
to provide an automatic catalogue
of drugs is a possibility. The elec-
tronic equipment might also mon-
itor the use and effectiveness of
drugs used in the treatment of
patients.

dent-we won't force anything on
him."
Kohl says pressure to learn
basic skills like reading at a spe-
cific age "often destroy a person."
"The students perform in guer-
rilla theatres, write poetry, make
musical instruments, and do any-
thing they and the Berkeley stul-
dents can come up with and afford
to do."I
"Most of our dropouts in the
Store Front are middle class kids
with a love-hate relationship to-
ward the Store," explained Kohl,
caused by parental pressure to
achieve in conflict with the Store
F r o n t 's unstructured education
policy.
However some parents and
teachers feel the unstructured at-
mosphere will lower the students
chances of entering college.
Some of the teachers who
threaten the Store Front, Kohl
says, are merely hiding behind
their rigid professional standard%
and not really teaching.
Lawson speaks
to convocation
(Continued from Pagel1)
nots of the, third world," and the
tasks that confront them.
"Can the University, or any rich
nation, take a new step and . be-
?in to adapt to the real needs
around them?" he asked. .
"Here, then, is a special role for
the white faculty member in the
predominantly Negro college,"
says Lawson. There is a placer for
the white inasmuch as he sym-
pathizes in the black's struggle "to.
put an end to exploitation of the
third world."
Likewise, if black faculty mem-
bers become numerous enough onb
white campuses to be more than
mere token signs of appeasement,
"they should be able to make
available some elements in the
black history and heritage of
which most whites are unaware."
In order to solve social an d
economic problems, Lawson called
for "new modes of humanism
which will define us as one peo-
ple, which will guide us as one
nation, which will guard us as
citizens of the world."

JI
Program Information
662-6264
Who wu 14
'<.'"; hate
U;suspected

By Wilfred Sheen in Esquire-April '69

SAT. and
SUN.
3:30, 6:30,
9:40

greetings

no one
under 18

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BONUS FEATURE *
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I am Master Sergeant
Albert Callan, and
I have no fears .
I have no fears

the
sergeant?
ROD9
STUNSHE
SERGEANT n

I

1

I

JUST
ONE
WEAKNESS
Just One!

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In

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_. _ _

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