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March 28, 1969 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-03-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Seven

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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PHI KAPPA ALPHA
Graduate Professional Fraternity
OPEN RUSH MEETING
SATURDAY AFTERNOON
MARCH 29
-1010 EAST ANN-

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After the

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wel fare

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MARKLEY
MIXER
TONITE!!V
9:30-1 2:3Q'
-featuring-
"Hour of the Wolf"

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(Continued from Page 1)
cally unchanged. The emer-
gency supplemental clothing al-
lowance granted to the ADC
children was an ephemeral gain
at best.
As Mrs. Fuller points out, "By
now our kids have already worn
out the clothes we bought last
fall, by June there will be noth-
ing left.
Furthermore, even the cloth-
ing allowance contributed by
the state and county were in-
sufficient for the needs of the
mothers. Mrs. Emerson says she
never had the opportunity to get
the clothing allowance for her
family.
"We were all sick then and
by the time we got down to the
office, the money was all gone.
I contacted my worker twice,
but there just wasn't any money
left," she says.

For Mrs. Emerson, the whole
clothing episode remains a very
bitter pill. "After all," she ar-
gues, "think of what we were
asking for. People shouldn't
have to go to jail to get clothes
for their kids . . . What kind of
a society is that?"
In the long run, however,
even the clothing issue disap-
pears in the overall need f o r
larger welfare grants. It is just
one battle in a never ending
struggle for more money,
The county, like many other
counties in the state, is exper-
iencing a rapid rise in welfare
applicants. The number of ADC
families in the county has risen
from 388 in 1960 to the cur-
rent 627.
In the past, the number has
always increased at a rate close
to the average population in-
crease of 3.4 percent. But re-

cently, the average increase has
jumped to the astounding rates
of 13.8 percent in 1967 and a
10 per cent increase last year
-rates which could double the
number of ADC families in the
county in less than 10 years.
But during a period of rapid
inflation, the ADC grants re-
main geared to a cost of living
index figured eight years ago,
in 1961.
This year, the state's proposed
budget would add only $2 per
person per month to the basic
ADC grant. And as Mrs. Fuller
says, "Two dollars won't change
anything, it still leaves us in
the same position as before."
Rev. Richard Crusius, chair-
man of the Washtenaw County
Citizens Advisory Committee for
Social Services, argues, "It's ob-
vious that ADC grants should be
based on costs of living. The
welfare grants are pegged at a
level below admitted needs."
Attorney Stewart agrees. "Only
if ADC checks are adjusted to
the current cost of living would
the necessity for renewing is-
sues like the supplemental
school clothing allowance dis-
appear," he says.
Rev. Crusius believes that one
major step in solving welfare
problems is simply "more money
in general and more money in
specific cases."
Particularly, Rev. Crusius out-
lines a number of programs
which need immediate atten-
tion:
- care for medical and dent-
al allowances;
- additional funds for in-
cidental allowances which are

-TONIGHT-

Ni//el 9nidasj 7lighAt
eoice4

I

remain
some counties can't afford to
appropriate supplemental funds
for ADC programs, and con-
sequently. would like to see pres-
sure brought upon the state for
across the board ncreases in
the basic ADC grant.
In any event, debate on the
quantity of money injected into
the welfare system tends to ig-
nore basic structural faults in
the welfare system itself.
Underlying the ADC grant is
the whole investigative system
which welfare departments un-
dertake to prove that an appli-
cant really deserves relief.
Rev. Crusius points out that
there are no investigations made
when a private citizen declares
his income tax, but when a poor
person asks for welfare, he must
be investigated instead of taken
at his word.
ADC mothers feel harrassed
by the constant intrusions on
their lives by caseworkers. Says
Mrs. Fuller, "a lot of mothers
would rather see their kids suf-
fer, than go through the har-
rassment they give you at the
office.
"They put you through a
washer and some mothers just
4 don't want to go through it."
Mrs. Emerson says "it is im-
moral for us to go to these
' people to keep us alive --if
people are crippled by a lack
of education and can't compete
in society, then they deserve
welfare."
Mrs. Franklin adds that when
she applied for her ADC grant,
"I didn't know I had to give my
life away, it's just terrible, and
it really made me angry. I think
they should be able to go about
it in another way."
ADC mothers are alienated by
the very structure of the inves-
tigative system, says Mrs. Emer-
son. "It's hard to explain the
relationship with the c a s e
worker; it's very threatening,
even if they are sympathetic,"
she explains. "Even for a per-
son like me with an education,
I still am frightened every time
I get into contact with them.
For somebody who doesn't know
their rights, it's an overwhelm-
ing experience."
As Rev. Crusius says, "Y o u
have to have an awful lot of
savvy to survive inethe present
sstem. The genuine poor can't
really plan ahead. They live
from day to- day."

7:15 p.m.
Speaker: MAJ. S. SEGEV
Israeli Military Expert
OPEN FORUM

now only two dollars per month;
- the opening of additional
regional offices in the county;
- more day care centers; and
- more job training oppor-
tunities.
The mothers are hoping f o r
county support for many of
these programs. "In general,'
says Stewart, "welfare recip-

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ALL THIS FOR ONLY
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IMLING SPEEOY ®ERVICE
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t s

ients feel that in addition to
Washington and Lansing, it is
the obligation of this relatively
wealthy county to supplement
ADC grants sufficiently so that
recipients can meet the h i g h
cost of living and live with a
certain dignity."
Cowley adds that "unless the
community is willing to invest
in the futures of welfare recip-
ients, there is little chance of
them getting off the welfare
roles.
"My own personal feeling is
that there is no welfare de-
partment in the country which
is meeting the needs of welfare
recipients."
While nearly everyone c o n-
cerned with the welfare situa-
tion agrees that more money is
needed for all welfare programs,
there is a debate as to whether
additional funds should b sup-
plied by the county or b the
state.
Workers in the department of
Social Services point out that
605 E. William 769-1593
Pal'.Reynolds
and
Dave Siglin
contemporary and traditional
folk music
FRI., SAT. 9:30, 10:301 V:30
MAR. 28, 29 $1.00

I .I

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Open: Mon~, Wed., and Thurs,.4 P.M.-2 A.M.
Open: Fri., Sat., Sun. Noon to 3 A.M. (Closed Tues.)
DeLONG'S PIT BARBECUE

I

314 Detroit St.
CARRY OUT ONLY

Phone 665-2266
FREE DELIVERY

"Safety belts? Not if
I'm just going down to
the supermarket."
Kathleen Farrell
(1943-1968)
"Safety belts? They,
just make me nervous.
Besides, they wrinkle
your clothes."
-Louis Claypool
(1931-1968)
"Who can ever
remember to use the
darned things?"
-Gordon Fenton
(1921-1968)
fiats your excuse?

:

I

z i i -L i main 5t.

68-95 I

Specializing in German and American Food
Dancing Friday, Saturday, and Sunday
Friday and Saturday Starting 9 P.M.
Sunday after WOIA 12:30-4 P.M. Broadcast
Serving Complete Dinners 11 a.m.-2 a.m.
City Parking Lot in rear of Restaurant
Closed Mondays

11

STEAK DINNERS,

Now' serving at REASONABLE prices
. . f.. ...~.
FILLET . .... 1.39
SIRLOIN .... 1.33
This includes baked potato,
salad, and texas toast.
STEAK BURGER .79
baked potato and texas toast
..~ 217 S. STATE

Bar-B-Q Beef Dinner .... . ....... . . $1.95
12 Fried Chicken ..................$1.55
Fried Shrimp.....................$1.60I
All Dinners include French Fries and Slow
COME and VISIT
CURTIS BEEF BUFFET
Where You Can Get
"The World's Best Dish"
CHICKEN IN THE ROUGH
as well as
ROUND OF ROAST BEEF
and many more dishes
207 S. MAIN
Open 7 days a week 11 A.M.-10 P.M.
MIKE ad JOE
. .
Init
You ndYou D l o:as, Nv
t=for
IZZA, ITL A

8 ' 10 75c

"RI)TH LESS"
Edgar G. Ulmer, dir. Sidney
Greenstreet, Louis Hayward

+ Use

Daily Classifieds +

s .._,_ _ _ . -,

Mar. 27
8 &10

75c

Mar. 28, 29
1:00 A.M.

NEXT TO STATE THEATRE
The t""4le 90;r
Locoted in Scenic Northern Arn Arbor Area (Dixboro)
'y ~ ~ Yrr.

It's been single-edged,double-edged,
banded, injectored, plastic-coated,
and now electro-coated.
But it's still straight.

..rPhoto by Ewing 'Galloway,
c&Vany'haemoved.
but the Puists
#StayOn...
The Paulists arrived on the
West Side of New York City
in 1858. In 1895 they moved
into San Francisco's China-
town and into the fringes of
Chicago's Loop in 1904.
They're still there.
Times change. Neighborhoods
change. Sometimes they go up.
Sometimes they go down -
but through it all the Paulist
stays. As long as there are
people to be served the Paulist
will be there.
The Paulist may be in the
same old place but he con-
stantly does new things. That's
one of the characteristics of
the Paulist order: using their
own individual talents in new
ways to meet the needs of a
fast-changing world in the col-
leges.. . in communications .. .

The blade.
Whatever else they've done to
it, one thing hasn't changed.
It's still straight.
And your face still isn't.
It's round.
The new Norelco Triple-
header gets around this problem.
We put our unique rotary
blades into three floating heads that
fnlln mi f~ ang by ,a ,, ,nina n woe

in two out of three shaves in an inde-
pendent lab test.
And you get a comfortable
shave because the Norelco floating
heads curve with your chin, bend with
your neck, and even straighten out for

your cheeks. Automatically. And with-
out a nick, pull or scrape.
The new Norelco has a hidden
trimmer that pops out for sideburns,
and a push button for easy flip-top
cleaning. It also comes in a recharge-
able model that gives almost twice as
many shaves per charge as any other
rechargeable.
We can't see you changing

I

'i...

I

I

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