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March 27, 1969 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-03-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

,

ge seven

I

Hunter hunts tough defensive backs

ig Eight powerhouses favored
to capture NCAA grappling title

By LEE KIRK
"Playingin theKsecondary is
rough," says new defensive back-
field coach Dick Hunter, "but it's
a challenge. I think this is the
main reason people like to play
there."
Consider the jobs a defensive
back must perform. He's got to
Scover huge tight ends and fleet
[flankers, fend off blockers and
bring down running backs in one-
on-one situations. These are not
tasks for mere mortals.
Hunter, one of the coaches who
migrated to Michigan from Miami
of Ohio when Bo Schembechler
was named head coach, feels that
a defensive back has to be a man
of many talents.
' A good defensive back has to
be an all-around athlete," Hunter
commented. "He has to be fast and
quick and he has to be tough
mentally as well as physically."
Hunter stresses the importance
of attitude and alertness for the
defensive back. "Except for the
quarterback, no one's mistakes are
as obvious as those of the defen-
sive back when he gets beat or
misses a tackle," Hunter says. "A
good back must learn not to let
these mistakes rattle him. He
must have poise."
Poise is a very important quality
for a defensive back, Hunter con-
tends, but one that must be learn-
Ted rather than taught.

-Dally--Larry Robbins
BRIAN HEALY (24), Wolverine defensive back returns an intercepted Minnesota pass in last sea-
son's game in Ann Arbor. Tom Curtis (25) and Phil Seymour (91) provide the escort as Healy heads
for the Gopher ,goal. Both Curtis and Healy return next season to give Michigan a solid base upon
which to build a new backfield.

HOPE FOR REPEAT:
Buckeyes opell grid

By The Associated Press
Late March is the time for the
lamb to emerge, and the lion to
return to its den and patiently
wait for the first sign of fall be-
fore stalking its prey in the jungle
of collegiate sports.
It is the time for the fan to re-
lax, to think carefully about what
he would do if he was in Lew
Alcindor's shoes, and to wait for
the slow and easy pace of the
baseball season where he can take
advantage of the between innings'
lull to flash the three ring sign
to the nearest vendor.
But if your name is Woody{
Hayes and your lion has suucceed-
ed in decapitating the head of
every hDavidon the college grid-
iron, you have ho sympathy for
the law of the seasons, for pen-
siveness, for a slow beer, and, least
of all, for anyone else in pads and
helmets.
Coach Hayes greets his national'
champion Buckeyes and a dozen
outstanding frosh candidates with
a sadistic and hungry eye to the
rest of the nation's gridiron elev-
ens on Monday, when Ohio State
opens five weeks of spring drills.
The Bucks are allowed four
practice sessions leading to and

climaxed by the spring game
windup on May 3.
Hayes has the unenviable task
of improving on the performance
of his 1968 squad which racked up
a perfect 9-0 season, an im-
,pressive Rose Bowl triumph over
Southern California and a na-
tional championship.
But there is such an abundance
of talent here that the Buckeyes
figure to be overwhelming favor-
ites to capture the Big Ten cham-
pionship and add to their 14-game
winning streak, the longest in the
nation.
Only three offensive regulars-
tackles Dave Foley, an All-Ameri-
can, Rufus Mayes and center John
Muhlbach-and a pair of defen-
sive stalwarts-middle guard Vic
Stottlemyer apd linebacker Mark
Stier, graduate.
Returning are-quarterback Rex
Kern, the super sophomore, and a
host of other sophs who blossom-
ed into fullefldged stars last sea-
son and will be juniors this fall.
Kern, recovering from surgery
for a chronic shoulder ailment,
will not participate in spring
drills. Backup Ron Maciejowski
will be at the throttle but Hayes

i
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3

Michigan Rugby
practiee Spring Schedule
rcic .MARCH3
and his aides want to take a good :i_29-CLEVELAND RUGBY
look at Don Lamka, up from the CLUB*
frosh squad. APRIL
There are few openings, indeed, 5-Michigan State*
on the first team offensive and 12/13-BIG TEN TOURNA-
defensive units. MENT (at Ferry Field),
Lamka, a 5-foot-11, 190-pound- 19-BORDERERS RUGBY
er is one of a half-dozen all-state CLUB
prep gridders who flocked to 27-HARTFORD (CONN.)
Ohio State last year. RUGBY CLUB
Lamka is a quarterback who is MAYr
not likely' to dislodge Kern or 3-Mid-American Tourna-t
Maciejowski. ment at Grant Park,
"He's too good an athlete to be Chicago
a third-string quarterback," says 10-Detroit Cobras Rugby
freshman coach Tiger Ellison. "He Club
will probably get a good test at 24-Sarnia Saints Rugby
linebacking as well as at quarter- Club
back."
31-Ontario Sevens Tourna-
Ellison figures "there're enough m1ent at Victoria Square,
good players coming up to pre- Torontor
vent last year's team from getting
fatheaded. Caps-home game
fa* dubleeade
"I certainly feel we will be a * doubleheader
little better than last year ...

The ability to outguess the op-
position is a valuableasset for a
defensive back, notes Coach Hun-
ter, adding that "A back can gain
a great advantage if he can anti-
cipate the pattern his man is
running."
Hunter brings with him a fine
record both as a player and a
coach. He attended Miami of Ohio
and was a quarterback there for
four years. Miami lost only six
games during these years and he
was named the team's most valu-
able player his senior year.
After graduation, he coached
high school ball for two years be-
fore becoming an assistant coach
at Denison University. He then
went to Wake Forest for. two
years before returning to Ohio as
a high school coach in his home
town of Barberton, where he led
the school to its first undefeated
season.
During these years, Hunter was
an offensive coach and he tutored
quarterbacks George Izo and Norm
Snead, both of whom later went
on to play in the pros. In 1967,
he became the defensive backfield
coach at his alma mater.
The transition from one side of
the scrimmage line to the other
was not a difficult one for Hunter.
"A defensive backfield coach is
concerned with essentially the
same problems as the offensive
coach," Hunter stated, "only he
looks at the other side of the
coin."
When he played for Miami,
Hunter was coached by 'Ara Par-
seghian, who is nowthe highly
successful mentor at Notre Dame.
"Ara was a great coach," Hunter
recalls. "He had a great way with
people but he was still tough. I
think every guy on that Miami
would have given their right arm
for him."
To Hunter, Parseghian and new
Wolverie mentor Bo Schembechler
are a lot alike! "Bo and Ara both
have always been greatly respected
by their players," he said.
In the past few years, Michigan
has had strong defensive back-
field and with All-American Tom
Curtis and Brian Healy returning
and a fine group of defensive
backs coming up from the fresh-
man team, Hunter expects to have
another fine secondary in the
coming season.
THERE IS
A MEETIN'
IT IS AN OPEN
HOOT
NEWMAN CENTER
Friday 8:30
come to entertain
or to be entertained

tj
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4
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,_

Granfal loon
presents
SUN., MAR. 30 1 P.M.-2 A.M.
Charging Rhinocerous of Soul Tickets'$2
Commander Cody
Terry Tute Blues Ban HELP THE
The Up RENT STRIKE
plus 5 others Tenant's Union

By PAT ATKINS
About all that the other wrest-
ling teams in the country can do
against the Big Eight Conference
in the 1969 NCAA Wrestling
Tournament is to file an anti-
trust suit and hope for the best.
In 34 out of the last 39 years
either Big Eight members Okla-
homa, Oklahoma State or I o w a
State, have captured the NCAA
title. For the 35th time, o n e of
these three Midwest magnates will
more than likely top the tourna-
ment field of 100 schools, with
Michigan State playing the role
of trust-buster.
Michigan will be sending seven
wrestlers, including one freshman
under the new Big Ten rule, to the
tournament which begins this af-
ternoon at Provo, Utah, and runs
through Saturday night.
The Wolverines going in the
lower weights are Jerry Hoddy at
115, Tim Cech at 123, freshman
Ty Belknap at 130, and Mike Ru-
bin - third in the Big Tens - at
137.
Big Ten Champion Lou Hudson
will not be entered due to a chest
injury incurred during the third
period of his Big Ten Champion-
ship match.
Others going for Michigan are
Tom Quinn at 160, Big Ten
champion Jesse Rawls at 167, and
Big Ten runner-up Pete Cornell

at 177 who placed fifth at 167 in
the NCAA's last year.
Only two returning champions
are slated for the 1969 tournament
and both wrestlers have moved up
a weight. Last year's 115-pound
titlist, Ken Melchoir, has jumped
to 123, thus giving the Wolverine's
Hoddy a little room to maneuver
at 115. And I o w a State's Dan
Gable, 130 pound champion in
1-968, will be in the 137 division.
Hoddy has not had much com-
petition this year, but has easily
outdistanced the opponents he has
wrestled. L a s t year's runner-up,
Sergio Gonzales of UCLA, is fav-
ored at 115.
Ty Belknap, Michigan's only
freshman representative, will also
be hampered by inexperience. Bel-
knap finished first in the Michi-
gan Freshman Wrestling Tourna-
ment this year, pinning all three
of his opponents, but his1 compe-
tition in the nationals will be over-
whelming.
Iowa State's 130-pounder Gable
- undefeated in collegiate com-
petition with 15 of his season's 17
wins coming on falls - has moved
to 137, but the division of 130 still
contains the Sooners formidable
Dave McGuire. McGuire won the
130-pound title two years ago, and
lost in the finals last year to Ga-
ble.
McGuire's stiffest competition

could come from Colorado State
College's Len Groom, undefeated
in 25 bouts. Gable could h a v e
trouble with Martin Willigan of
Hofstra. whipped o n 1 y once by
Gable, or Ron Russo of Blooms-
burg State with a 17-0-2 record.
Michigan's Big Ten champion
Rawls, 13-2-1, and captain Cor-
nell, 14-3-1, could be the Wolver-
ine's one-two punch in the three
day tournament, with Rawls at
167 and Cornell at 177.
Michigan doesn't have a repre-
sentative at heavyweight, but it
could turn out to be the classiest
match of all. This year's Big Ten
champion, MSU's Jeff Smith, will
probably oppose Oregon State's
Jeff Lewis, 19-0 for the season, in
the finals.
Defending champion Oklahoma
State, winner of the B i g Eight
Tournament by one point o v e r
Oklahoma, has been NCAA titlist
26 times, but is still a slight un-
derdog to t h e favored Sooners.
Oklahoma State, Iowa State, and
Michigan State have the power to
wrest the crown from Oklahoma.
Ranked behind them are Iowa,
Colorado State College, Cal Poly,
Navy, Lock Haven and Maryland.
But in the year of the conglom-
erates, the Big Three of the Big
Eight will once again monopolize
the NCAA tournament.

I

LEADERSHIP COUPLE NEEDED
for monthly (May-August) college service weekend pro-
grams at Maxey Boys' Training School (a correctional insti-
tution for boys 12-17, 12 miles north of Ann ,Arbor), spon-
sored by the American Friends Service Committee, 1414 Hill
St. Modest honorarium available. For more info, call Bruce
Nordstrom, M-F, 9-12 or 1-5, at 761-8283.

.I

I

THURSDAY, MARCH 27

NOON

E

Luncheon-Discussion at the
ECUMENICAL CAMPUS CENTER, 921 Church
"WHERE IS PREJUDICE?"
a National Educational Television film
"It doesn't take much imagination to speculate on the
now and the what and the why . . . . the question
is where is prejudice?"
-LUNCH 25c-
SPAGHETTI
DINNER
TIME
Is Sunday, March 30, at SDT sorority
1405 Hill St. from 5:00-8:00 P.M.
PRICE: $1.25 ALL ARE INVITED
BRING YOUR FRIENDS!
Lee Composition Co.
OPENING IN ANN ARBOR
COLD-TYPE COMPOSITION-TYPESETTING
FOR PHOTO OFFSET
BM-FRIDEN-VARITYPER HEADLINER
NEGATIVES-PLATES-MAILING
2440 W. STADIUM 761-4922

We never slack

off

I

F OLLETTrS
STATE STREET AT NORTH UNIVERSITY o ANN ARBOR
will be
CLOSED
FOR
INVENTORY
FRIDAY-March 28th
and
SATURDAY-March 29th

" f i'n'k t{1
C. '

on

fashion.
And here's evidence. Trim,
tailored Haggar slacks in
premium fabric of dacron
and wool. The comfort-
designed slacks. Machine
washable, stain and crease
resistant... and, they
never need ironing. Choose
distinctive style and fit - in
fashion colors. Brown, olive,
navy, black, medium blue.

I

Synchronized Swim Show
MICHIFISH

presents
A NIGHT OF FROST

Women's Pool
Thursday-Friday-Saturday
March 27, 28, 29

Only $13.00.

Stop in soon.

-r----

_ __ ~1

I

SHOWING
RENE CLEMENTS
Anti-War Masterpiece
FORBIDDEN GAMES
WINNER
Grand Prize-Venice Film Festival

8:15 P.M.

Tickets can be purchased at the door

i

m

> } C <;;:C> ?o" CCOOQ ' 0Osm
SPRING
' I r

$1.25

J

SINCE 184$

4

.l(i f l

I E I I E E 7I - I hI S I T a

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