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March 27, 1969 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-03-27

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announces petitions for
CENTRAL COMMITTEE
H omecoming '69
Petitions available Students Office,
2nd floor Union. Due March 31

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NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

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hrijan

atly

second front page

Thursday, March 27, 1969

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page Three

Hello, this is a survey for Republican 487

AIA1TfONAL GENERAL CORPORATION'
POX "ZMRN TtieATREs
fOR. 375 No. M -RD. "7694300

NOW SHOWING
MON. THRU FRI. 7:00-9:00
SAT.-SUN. 1:00-3:00-5:00-7:00-9:00

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By DANIEL ZWERDLING
Members of the campus Young Re-
publicaps have been posing as stu-
dents taking surveys for political sci-
ence classes in a city-wide telephone
survey. The study is aimed at deter-
mining personal voting habits for the
benefit of current Republican cam-
paigns.
"We wanted to know which voters
are Republicans," explains Craig
Ruff, chairman of Young Republicans,
"but we thought that voters wouldn't
respond if we identified ourselves as
Republicans."
The use of fraudulent identifica-
tions was first reported several weeks
ago when Dan Jones, Grad., received
two calls in two nights from students
who both claimed they were making
political science surveys of voter ha-
bits.
"I became suspicious when the
second caller began asking me t h e

same type of questions as the first,"
says Jones. "They asked me for in-
formation which would be helpful
to a political party."
The first interviewer who called
Jones has been identified as a re-
searcher from the Institute of Public
Policy Studies, which is currently
studying voter habits in Ann Arbor.
The second caller, however - Kay
Domine, 69, - claimed she was mak-
ing a survey for a Political Science 487
course assignment. Prof. Kenneth
Langton, who teaches the course says,
"There was no such assignment.'
kiss Domine now acknowledges she
was making calls for the Young Re--
publicans. The approach "was not
legitimate," she says, but she used
it anyway because the Young Repub-
licans "told me to."
Ruff says the organization "was
trying to make up an imaginative wayt
of contacting voters. Several of us

used a line - 'approach' is a better
word - that we were students taking
a survey for a course.
"We wanted to see if the response
would be better than if we identified
ourselves as members of Young Re-
publicans.
"And in a way," says Ruff, "We
were students taking surveys for our
personal information."
Ruff admits, however, that the re-
sults of the survey have been turned
over to Republican headquarters. The
lists of registered voters used for the
survey were provided by the Wash-
tenaw County 'Republicans.
The survey - which is still under-
way - originated in a Washtenaw
County Republican committee.
Party chairman Nancy Chase, says
such canvassing "is constantly done"
to identify the political affiliation of
voters since Michigan voters do not
register by party.

However, she claims canvassers are
instructed to identify themselves as
Republicans or as workers for a par-
ticular candidate.
Mrs. Chase says the Young Repub-
licans have helped canvass, but claims
she did not know they were using
false identifications as an approach.
However, City Democratic chairman
Walter Scheider says, "For years we
have recorded stories of very suspic-
ious surveys."
Ruff now claims the Young Repub-
licans are no longer using their first
approach. "When he (Langton) gave
us some flak we immediately began
identifying ourselves as Republicans,"
says Ruff.
Ruff adds that the response is now
far better. "Democrats are answering
the questions, and Republicans a r e
volunteering to help in the campaign,"
he says.
"We were wrong to use the ap-

proach - not only from an ethical
standpoint, but from a pragmatic
standpoint as well," he admits.
Prof. Jim Eisenstein of the political
science department, who reported the
Young Republicans survey to Lang-
ton, says the approach is injurious in
terms of social research.
"A lot of what political scientists do
.depends on the ability to conduct legi-
timate surveys. Misuse of surveys tends
to inhabit the neutral use of them,"
he explains.
The issue may not yet be over. Miss
Domine claims she has had consulta-
tions with Langton. "He calls me
periodically and says he'll take the
issue to the Dean (William Hays of the
literary college)," she says.
Langton, however, denies having
threatened to take her to the Dean.

COLUMBIA PICTURES ?
U-
A..and the demolition
Dean t isdelicious!
The Wrecking Crew

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THEATRE CLEARED AFTER 7 P.M. SHOW FRI.-SAT.
HELD OVER - 4th BIG WEEK
"A VERY FUNNY, IRREVERENT
NOW-GENERA TION-MOVIE LAMPOON!"
- William Wolf, Cue

SWSU PROPOSAL

the
news today,
by The Associated Press and College Press Service

Recruiting drive sought

1

PRESIDENT NIXON told Congress yesterday he would not
extend the surtax if the Vietnam war ends and inflation subsides.
Nixon also said he will try to outdo the Johnson administration
in holding d o w n federal spending. However, Nixon admitted the
chances of doing that had deteriorated since Johnson submitted his
spending and revenue estimates in January.
Nixon also admitted that half the envisioned surplus of 3.4 bil-
lion would probably disappear.
* * *
JORDAN requested an urgent meeting of the UN Security
Council yesterday in the wake of an Israeli air attack near the
Jordanian capital.
Sources in Jordan reported that Israeli warplanes killed 18 civ-
ilians, injured 25 and inflicted heavy damages near Salt, an Arab
trade center and quarry town.
Israel has charged that Salt is fraught with saboteurs.
Meanwhile, Defense Minister Moshe Dayan reported that France;
has sold 700 armored troop carriers, from surplus French and Ger-
man army stocks, which will be passed on to Egypt.i
STATE DEPARTMENT OFFICIALS yesterday denied the 1
United States paid North Korea a ransom for the release of thef
Pueblo.
The National Chairman of the Remember the Pueblo Committee,1
Rev. Paul D. Lindstrom, claimed yesterday the ransom had been paid.'
In their address to a group of newsmen the officials said they
still want the ship returned.1
* * *
PAKISTAN was calm yesterday following the imposition of
martial law.
Gen. Agha Mohammed Yahya Khan threatened dissenters Tues-
day with imprisonment and even execution in hopes of ending the
violent anti-government agitation that brought the country to the
brink of civil war.
Yahya replaced Ayub Kahn who resigned the presidency Tues-
day. Yahya said he wanted to eliminate "this state of near anarchy"
in order to prepare the country for free elections.
Education officials in many cities announced that schools andj
colleges would reopen next week for the first time since last Novem-
ber's protest marches against the government.

PLUS BONUS FEATURE *
"ONE OF THE YEAR'S 10 BEST"-N.Y. Times
"ONE OF THE YEAR'S 10 BEST"-Saturday Review
"ONE OF THE YEAR'S 10 BEST"-N.Y. Post
THE
FI FTH
HORSEMAN
IS FEAR
THURS. - 8:00 ONLY FRI. - 8:00, 11:10

Jane MiXerI
Seek clues
By GEORGE MILLER
The Board of Directors of the
Lawyers Club, in conjunction with
the State Police, has issued an,
appeal for information on Univer-
sity law student Jane Mixer's ac-
tivities preceding her murder last
week.
Frank Eaman, a law student on
the board, said yesterday the 23-
year-old Miss Mixer was probably
seen last Thursday between 6p.m.
-when she last Was reported at
the Lawyers Club-and midnight.
Her body was found the next
morning in a cemetery in Van
Buren Township near Ypsilanti.
According to police, Miss Mixer
was wearing a two-piece gray
suit and a blue bluose. She was
carrying a yellow raincoat wrap-
ped around some clothes on
hangers, a beige overnight bag, a
dark brown purse and a Hudson's
shopping bag.t

1.
-

inkillingt
Eaman hopesnthis description
will aid in obtaining information
about whom she was with or what
she was doing that evening. Any-
one having such information
should contact the Lawyers Club
at 764-1116 or the police. Infor-
mation phoned in anonymously,
will also be accepted.
Eaman said Miss Mixer was
presumably met by someone in
the vicinity of the club sometime'
after 6 p.m. and left in that per-
son's car.
The Detroit News has offered a
$2,000 reward for any tip leading'
to the arrest and conviction of the
killer.-
Police are also investigating the
murder of 16-year-old Maralynn
Skelton whose body was found
Tuesday in a wooded area near
Earhard Road, on the outskirts of
Ann Arbor.

By STEVE KOPPMAN
Social Work Student Union yes-
terday urged that the school's ad-
missions and scholarship commit-
tee give top priority considerations
to new methods for recruiting
more minority group students.
The resolution, presented by
student members of the commit-
tee, recommends the committee
consider a preferential selection
policy for blacks, Spanish Amer-
icans, Mexicans, Puerto Ricans,
American Indians, Orientals and
Appalachian whites.
The resolution further urges the
committee to consider hiring an

additional recruiter to concen-
trate on the minority groups. The
group has recently hired a faculty
member who will concentrate on
the recruitment of black students.
The resolution also proposes a
possible change in admission re-
quirements for the social work
school,
This could involve waiving the
BA degree as an absolute require-
ment, for "socially conscious and
active people who have demon-
strated their interests by doing
meaningful work in agencies and
the community," says Jack Ma~-'
eus, SW '70, co-author of the re-
solution. This could include work-
ers and indigenous leaders lacking
the traditionally required under-
graduate degree.
Faculty members in the de-
partment had mixed reactions
about SWSU's suggested priorities.
"To broaden our recruiting to
other minority groups would be
an important and proper innova-
tion," said Prof. John Erlich. Con-
cerning the possibility of waiving
BA requirements, Erlich said he
"would hope this school would
consider this as one of its top
priorities, at least on an experi-
mental basis."
Dean Fidele Fauri indicated his
willingness to explore the pos-
sibility of such a program, but
noted there are several hundred
universities in the country, includ-
ing this one, which offer under-
graduate degrees in social work.
Referring to the recent hiring
of a recruiter for black students,
Fauri said, "With the tight bud-
get, we're not in a position to get
another recruiter."
Currently, students without the

BA can take a limited number of
credits in the Social Work School,
but cannot pursue the masters de-
gree in social work. Any proposal
for an experimental program of
waving the BA would require the
approval of both the social work
faculty, and the Regents.
Eisenhower-
1sti Fcritical
Army doctors reported yesterday
that Former President Eisen-
hower's failure to respond to
vigorous treatment the past several
days marks "an unfavorable prog-
nostic sign."
In a medical bulletin, the hos-
pital's command general, Brig.
Gen. Frederick J. Hugher Jr. said:
"There has been no appreciable
improvement in Gen. Eisenhower's
condition since this morning's
bulletin.
"Failure to respond to vigorous
therapy over the last several days
is considered to be an unfavorable
prognostic sign."
However, Eisenhower's doctors
say the General is not necessarily
near' death. The doctors point to
Eisenhower's "inherent stamina"
which they believe has enabled
him to withstand many serious
.illnesses in the past 14 years.
The morning bulletin reported
Eisenhower had suffered from
congestive heart failures.
He suffered a recurring episode
Monday of a previous heart
flare-up.

r s
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DAILY CLASSIFIEDS
BRING QUICK RESULTS

"A SUPERLATIVE FILM 1"

I

"'THE SERGEANT' IS WORTH SEEING!
Steiger is 'The Sergeant' and you really don't have to under-
stand him to have a certain awe and wonder at what he does."
- N.Y. TIMES
"A PICTURE OF MANY EXCELLENCES !"
-N.Y. POST

G)IIRjlBUY..,OUSB
presents
B[OB FR[ANK
AND HIS BAND
8 P.M. MARCH 28-29 free eats
$1.50 FRIDAY and SATURDAY free love
Layin it on for 2 nites!!
(Singin', guitars in red glare, cello, saxophone, bass;
piano, harp, hand clappin' and foot stompin'!!)
"This is the dawning of the Age of Asparagus"

the emu players series presents
AN
ITALIAN
STRAW
HAT
madcap french farce with music
emu's quirk
auditorium
march 26-30 TIX $1.75
FOR RESERVATIONS: 482-3453
(Weekdays 12:45-4:30 P.M.)f

"DIRECTED with taste and sensitivity.
manly persuasive performance." -'

Featuring uncom-
SATURDAY REVIEW

mwmmmwwmmmlinm

A SERVICE of The Alternative
MAD MARVIN Invites You to Trip with Him and his
stoned out friends in a Comedy Program.

1 am Master Sergeant
Albert Callan,
and I have
no fears ...
I have

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11

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Friday ONLY

7:30 and 930

Natural Science Auditorium

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no
fears

S.

W.C. FIELDS-"HURRY, HURRY"
LAUREL AND,'HARDY-- TWO TARS"
-featuring vintage cars in the wildest comic destruc-
tion scene ever
CHARLIE CHAPLIN--"SHOULDER ARMS"
--A"classic satire on WWI
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Also "INSPIRATION"
-famous Czech animated film featuring a dream
world in a drop of water, "Wig-Wags" -- an early
"Drag" comedy
and for camp fans--a
CAPTAIN MARVEL SERIAL CHAPTER!
A.1.... ..... AMI V Q1 fnnd r(nllnrl

A SEE' tT. NOW
Shows
of
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..: . . " 4 . .. ..

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