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March 25, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-03-25

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INTERNATIONAL CENTER
BENEFIT CONCERT
featuring
EDGAR TAYLOR
"VARIATIONS ON A THEME"
Tuesday, March 25
RACKHAM AUD. $1.75
TICKETS ON SALE IN SAB NOW
INTERNATIONAL EMPHASIS
WEEK

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

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Sfiriitn

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second front pag

Tuesday, March 25, 1969 Page Three

Increasing thefts

plague

U U

By SHARON WEINER
An increasing theft problem in the
University's dormitory system has
brought action on both student and
administrative levels.
Currently, the worst situation is in
South Quad. However, University
Housing Director John Feldkamp says
other dorms, notably Martha Cook,
East Quad, and Alice Lloyd have also
been hard hit by theft this year.
Students in South Quad have cir-
culated a petition demanding imple-
mentation of an effective security
system, fullest enforcement of tres-
passing regulations, and development
of staff and resident awareness of
responsibilities and measures to be
taken in case of theft.
Co-sponsor of the bill, Yvonne
Schumacher, '71, explains, "We defi-

nitely feel something has to be done.
As it stands now, anyone can come uy'
the main stairs and roam the halls,
even if they are unescorted, and aren't
supposed to."
"Perhaps," she adds, "they could
have dorm personnel stopping the un-
escorted individuals."
At least 50 girls have signed the
petition in Hunt House alone. It
hasn't been distributed to the other
houses of South Quad yet.
The petition was adopted by Inter-
House Assembly (IHA), and will be
circulated in all the other dorms.
IHA President Jack Myers says a
letter has been mailed to all dorm resi-
dents describing the situation.
Housing officials attribute the prob-
lem to high school aged youths from
the Ann Arbor area. Director of South
../..._ _'?-r

Quad John Lindquist says they are a
highly organized group of at least 20,
who have been seen in many of the
dorms during each new rash of thefts.
Lindquist reports that a campus se-
curity official has said the group
formerly used the Union as their base,
but since it now closes at 8 p.m. in-
stead of 11 p.m., they had no place to
congregate.
South Quad's Club 600 (the snack
bar), attracted them to the dorm,
Lindquist says, and residents report
that they were found in rooms and on
corridors where thefts are later re-
ported. They then gathered in the
snack bar.
Club 600 now insists on seeing stu-
dent ID's when students pass through
the snack bar line.
Security police, Lindquist says,

dorm r
would cost more money than is now
available to the dorms. In addition,
state legislation curbs the authority of
private security police.
Currently, night clerks are charged
with reporting fires and trespassers,
but have no authority to make arrests.
Students and some of the dorm di-
rectors met with the Regents last
Friday. Myers says they were "horri-
fied"- when they heard of the extent
of the thefts.
Otis Smith, ex-Michigan Supreme
Court judge, was very concerned,
Myers explained, and said the Regents
would look into ways of correcting the
problem.
Felkamp is also meeting with an
Ann Arbor juvenile judge soon to ask
for suggestions.
In addition to the individual dorm

Psiden ts
precautions, several off-duty police-
men have been stationed around cam-
pus, Feldkamp says.
In Alice Lloyd, one official reports,
they have taken the precaution of
locking an extra door, but "the 24
hour visitation policy complicates
security measures."
The individual thefts range from
wallets taken from unlocked rooms to
mass robberies of allegedly over $6,000
worth of technical equipment like tape
recorders, television sets and typewrit-
ers over the spring break in Baits
housing and Markley.
While the mass thefts are a 'sea-
sonal problem, the current accelera-
tion of petty robberies in conjunction
with the high school group is-new and
disturbing.

i

LOOKING FOR THE
-T ION
UNION-LEAGUE
PUBLICATION COMMITTEE is part of where it's at
-chairmanships and other positions available for
this summer and fall in

the
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ADVERTISING
CALENDAR NOTEBOOK
and many new projects
Sign up at Michigan League
3rd floor UAC office!

news sosay
by The Associated Pr ess and College Press Service

UAW

SUPPORTS TENANTS' UNION
gives $1000 to strike

I

PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM

POESSIRO NALP THEARL POGRA
presents
S tratord
Festival Theatre of Canada

THE
ALCHEMIST
with WilliamnHutt, Powys Thomas,
Bernard Behrens
Directed by JEAN GASCON
MAR. 25, 26, 27, APR. 3, 4, 5, 6

PRESIDENT NIXON and Canada's Prime Minister
Trudeau met yesterday for two days of "get-acquainted"
talks.
A wide range of international situations was discussed,
including East-West relations, the Middle East, European and
NATO affairs, Vietnam and Latin America.
It was reported that Trudeau did not bring up the con-
troversy rising in Canada about the possibility that Sentinel
missiles fired from U.S. bases might explode over Canadian
territory.
The prime minister was Nixon's first official foreign vis-
itor.
SPAIN IS EXPECTED to ask the U.S. to reaffirm that
"a threat to either country would be-a matter of common
concern to both."
This cautious phrase was contained in a declaration of
1963 when the two countries extended for five years their
1953 agreement on American air and naval bases in Spain.
The agreement expired Sept., 1968. An additional six-
month period for negotiations will come to an end tomorrow.
If there is no agreement by then, the U.S. must evacuate
the bases within a year.
DELEGATES to a national convention of R o m a n
Catholic Priests in New Orleans insisted yesterday that
there be an open discussion of the major problems of the
church.
The Rev. Joseph O'Donoghue of Washington, D.C., said
"It is simply incredible that the birth control issue is no-
where scheduled for open discussion at this national meet-
ing."
O'Donoghue, the first of fourteen priests to be removed
from parish duties by Patrick Cardinal O'Boyle for his out-
spoken views, asked that the agenda be scrapped.
He explicitly called for debate on the issues of birth con-
trol, race, poverty, and peace.
DEMOCRATS and George C. Wallace's American In-
dependent Party face a major test today in a special con-
gressional election in Tennessee.
The Democrats will be striving to restore the balance of
the state's congressional delegation to the 5-4 edge they had
before the district's Dem. Rep. Robert A. Everett died last'
January.
The American Independents will find out how strong they
are without Gov. Wallace on the ticket.
Although the district is normally Democratic, the voters
went for Wallace last fall.
The congressional election is the first in the nation since
November.
.0 .
THE GOVERNMENT, alarmed that big business in
the form of widely diversified conglomerate companies
will prove harmful, is beginning a crackdown.
The first announced target is the $3 billion Ling-Temco-
Vought, Inc., of Dallas, Tex. The Justice Department said
Sunday that it would file an antitrust suit to compel LTV to
dispose of its 63 per cent interest in Jones and Laughlin Steel
Corp., the country's sixth largest steelmaker.

-Associated Press
PRESIDENT NIXON and Canadian Prime Minister Pierre
Trudeau met in Washington yesterday to begin a series of talks.
Trudeau and Nixon will spend two days in "getting acquainted"
talks.
MILLER DROPS OUT:
SGC presidential election
'scheduled for tomorrow

HAMLET

1
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By LAURIE HARRIS
The rent strike steering committee has received $1,000 in
support from the United Auto Workers, as announced last
week.
Irving Bluestone, assistant to UAW president Walter Reu-
ther, met yesterday with the strike steering committee and
presented them with the check.
The money was not designated for any specific purpose,
but was a attempt "to give whatever assistance we can to a
worthwhile effort," Bluestone explained.
Bluestor ; stressed that the --
UAW wanted only to help support
the strike and would have fno say % i
whatever in the actions of the
Tenants' Union.
Steering committee member
Peter Denton, Grad, said that the R T C study
money will go into the general
strike fund to help cover operating
expenses, including legal fees. byA ssem bly
There was some indication,
however, that the UAW might be (Continued from Page 1)
able to help the Tenants' Union granting credit for a limited num-
politically at a later date in the ber of courses in the ROTC -
strike's development, if help is which would have amounted to a
needed, substantial reduction - or abol-
At the present time the Tenants' ishing credit completely.
Union will utilize the UAW's mul- The whole committee approved
tilith for printing material, said abolishing credit along with the
Denton. He added that a meeting call for talks with ROTC com-
is being arranged with Marcellius mandants and the Defense De-
Ivory, the UAW's representative partment on how to handle the
in the Ann Arbor area. programs.
The only request Bluestone But yesterday's decision chang-
made to the steering committee ed the area of debate. The execu-
was that a full summary be given tive committee recommended that
to developments in the strike since the issue be turned over to the
his last meeting with them three University-wide Senate Assembly
weeks ago. because it felt the question was
Stuart Katz, Grad, another greater than just the academic
member of the steering commit- credit of ROTC in one college.
tee said, the Tenants' Union will In a letter dated Friday,
begin investigating the possibility M a r c h 21, Hays wrote cur-
of broadening its perspectives to r i c u 1 u m committee chairman
cofr brig tserspcnity tohanames Gindin, "If these larger
cove moretecomulainit.tanissues "are at the ;heart of the
Another major point discussed Univerty-wide importhey are of
at the meeting Sunday was stra- they should be faced directly, and
tegy to be used by tenants who by the larger University c o in -
have already come to trial. Katz munity, rather than piecemeal
said there will be two main alter- through evaluations of course cre-
natives. Students must either con- dit within the several faculties."
tinue striking or pay the rent that The earlier recommendation
is designated by the court. along with the full committee re-
Members of the steering com- port on the issue will be sent to
mittee will discuss alternatives the Assembly for an All-University
with each individual striker, and decision. A copy of the report used
recommend the best course of at Stanford University on the
action. question of ROTC and the univer-
In the official statement from sity will also be sent to Assembly.
the UAW, Bluestone said "The It was on the basis of that re-
UAW is happy to give support port that Stanford severed ties
to the Ann Arbor Tenants' Union with ROTC recently.
in its fight to insure decent hous- In the April meeting of the
ing for the students and citizens college faculty a curriculum com-
in the community." mittee report on ROTC will be
"The UAW has given this fi- presented. It will concern the
nancial contribution of $1,000 and ROTC and an explanation of re-
is prepared to work ,with the Ann committee's policy c h a n g e on
Arbor Tenants' Union in achiev- ROTC and an explanation of re-
ing its goals," Bluestone said. quests for a study by the Senate

with Kenneth Welsh, Lec
Ciceri, Angela Wood
Directed by JOHN HIRSCH
MAR. 28, 29, 30,
APR. 1, 2

TUES.-SUN. at 8 P.M.-- MATS. THURS. & SAT. at 2:30 P.M.
2 WEEKS ONLY!
Seats Now at
MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

(Continued from Page 1)
John Koza, Grad, at the request
of Koeneke and Neff.
Koeneke and Neff refused to.
immediately certify the results
produced by Koza, however.
"Koza's latest recount will be
considered -by C and R today,"
said Neff, "although the original
tally remains as the certified re-
sults."
Neff said that the new results,
while shifting Nelson from second
to third place, "simply indicate an
even greater necessity for a three-
way run-off."
According to the official SGC
count as of last night, Miller and
Rosenbaum lead the three-man
race with 2133 votes. Nelson and
Livingston are in second place,
with 1676, seven votes ahead of
McLaughlin and Van er Hout,
In a joint statement released
last night, SGC President Michael
Koeneke and Vice President Bob

Neff defended the figures certified
Thursday.
While the new figures might
"create doubt as to the accuracy
of the certified results, we are
confident that these official re-
sults were rechecked sufficiently
to leave little question as to their
validity"
Koeneke and Neff have been
reluctant to support a movement
for a hand recount of the votes,
claiming this would be even more
inaccurate.
Miller and Rosenbaum demand-
ed a recount by hand, however.
"We will stand by the results of a
hand recount," said Rosenbaum
Sunday.
He reaffirmed that position last
night, adding that he and Miller
believed the top two candidates,
as determined by the manual re-
count, should be involved in either
a run-off, or two-man binding
arbitration.

Read and Use Daily Class ifeds

r"

r

'U

- i

CONTRARY TO POPULAR OPINION
The Ed. School.Is Alive

and will be debating the merits
approach to education with:

of the humanist

Ravi
Shankart
MARCH 26

WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY 4:10 P.M.
Department of Speech
Student Laboratory Theatre
presents
WOMEN AT THE' TOMB
by Michel de Ghelderode
March 26th & 27th Admission Free
Arena Theatre, Frieze Building

Presents
NO. 5
by Yoko Ono
TWO VIRGINS
by John Lennon and Yoko Ono
PLUS
OTHER SHORTS
Mr. Lennon requests that the
members of the audience bring
their own instruments to create

HERB KOHL, BERNIE MEHL,
ROBERT HAVIGHURST, and
GEORGE GEIS
10 A.M.--6 P.M., Friday, March 28
And in the Evening:
A FESTIVAL OF LIFE
The Charging Rhinoceros of Soul, Houston Hollow,

HILL AUD.

N4ATIONAL OENERAI. CORPORATION j,
FOX EASTERN THEARES
FOR VILLGE
375 No. MAPLE RD.-769-1300

LAST TIMES TODAY
"Romeo and Juliet"
1:30-4:00-7:00-9:30

,

Tickets on Sale Now,
SAB
$2.00, $2.50 ;$3.00

* STARTS TOMORROW *

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