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March 23, 1969 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-03-23

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, March 23, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Sunday, March 23, 1969

Sorority and Fraternity Houses!
Good cooks are hard to get
Let yours enjoy a free Sunday. Have your Sunday
dinner catered by us. Very gooc food, moderately
priced.
Call for free estimates,
665-4967 or Eves. 663-5895

SAci dor,

Bruins

rout

frigid

Put due

SUNDAY, MARCH 23

Leroy Waterman Lectureship
PROFESSOR JAMES A. SANDERS of
Union Theological Seminary, New York
One of the outstanding Old Testament scholars of this country
Professor Sanders has recently been addressing himself to
the particular relevance of the Old Testament for today's
world. He is uniquely fitted to begin this lectureship estab-
lished to honor Professor Leroy Waterman, former head of
the Near Eastern Studies Department at the University of
Michigan and one of the translators of the Old Testament for
the Revised Standard Version and for the American Bible.
Professor Sanders will be speaking at the First Baptist Church,
East Huron Street, at
11:00 A.M., a Sermon, and at
4:00 P.M., a Lecture to which the
entire community is invited
Co-sponsored by the OFFICE OF RELIGIOUS AFFAIRS

By The Associated Press
LOUISVILLE - Awesome Lew
Alcindor closed his incredible col-
lege career with a 37-point per-
formance yesterday and led his
UCLA teammates to an unpre-
cedented third consecutive na-
tional basketball championship
with a devastating 92-72 victory
over Purdue.
The soft-spoken giant f r o m
New York, an intimidating power
on defense and a jauggernaut on
offense, also collected 21 rebounds
and demoralized the Boilermakers
by his mere presence.
Purdue, stone cold from the
start, was in the title game for
only the first four minutes. The
Bruins then ran off eight con-
secutive points, including a three-
point play by big Lew, establish-
ed a 14-6 lead and were never ser-
iously threatened again.
The Big Ten champions made at
least two runs at the Bruins but
trailed most of the time by a wide
margin.
Their first move came just be-
fore intermission, when their
pressing defense forced UCLA in-
to a couple of errors. They con-
verted them into six consecutive
points and trailed 42-31 at the
half.
Then, midway in the second half,
Purdue outscored UCLA 8-1, cut-
ting the deficit to 11-at 76-65.
But for the most part, it was
too much Alcindor-a 7-1% mar-
vel, a three-time All-American
and possibly the most outstanding
player in the history of the game.
Big Lew marched off the court
with 1:19 remaining, a broad grin1
stretched across his usually in-
passive face and both hands rais-
ed aloft with a single finger point-
ing, symbolizing No. 1.
Alcindor, the guiding force in
the Bruins' fantastic record of
88-2 in his college career, stood
alone on a chair and ripped down
the net and draped it round his
neck when the game was over-
then marched to the Purdue bench
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and shook hands with each of the
Boilermakers' players.
He scored most of his points
from close in on rebounds and
powerful layups, getting excellent
passes from his teammates.
Purdue, obviously awe-struck by
Alcindor and pressing its shots,
simple wasn't up to it.
The Boilermakers hit only 12 of
51 shots in the first half and Rick
Mount, their All-American, was
good on only three of his first 18
attempts from the floor.
He finished with 28 points, 20
of them in the last half.
Alcindor's chief supporters in-
cluded guard Kenny Heitz, whose
harrassing defense plagued Mount,
John Vallely, with 15 points, Cur-
tis Rowe, with 12, and Lynn
Shackelford, with 11.
Wooden credited Heitz with
containing Mount, who finished
several points short of his average,
Purdue Coach George King dis-
agreed with Wooden on the im-
portance of Heitz's defensive play
on Mount.
"Rick got the shots he's been
getting all year, but it was just
one of those nights," King said.
While King admitted that
Mount's 33 per cent field goal
average was his worst of the sea-
son, he still was "a little surprised
we didn't make it any closer."
"It was pretty much in their
(UCLA) hands after the first eight
or 10 minutes," King said. "They
handled us pretty easy."
King felt that the mere pres-
ence of Alcindor changed the
game.
UCLA closed this third c-ham-
pioiship season with a ,29-1 rec-
ord and Purdue finished at 23-5.

I.

LEW ALCINDOR stands with the net around his head after
leading UCLA to its third straight national basketball cham-
pionship, setting a record. The title is the Bruin's fifth in six
years, making John Wooden the first basketball coach to win
five NCAA championships.
BC UPSET:
Ows capture NIT;
VolSstn consolation

tie

PURDUE

i C_
Bill +Cusurnano

Gillian
Faerber
Johnson
Mounit
Keller
Kaufman
Bedford
Taylor
IWeatherford

Ravi
hankar

2-14
1-2
4-9
12-36
4-17
0-0
3-8
0-0
1-6
27-92

3-3
0-0
3-4
4-5
3-4
2-2
1-3
0-0
2-2
18-23

7
2
11
28
11
2
7
0
4{
72

T ake a bow, Lewie,
you've earned it
The boys at The Daily got the bright idea that I would fin-
ish my coverage of the basketball season by giving an expert
analysis of the NCAA championship game. I've got news for them,
expert analysis was not needed. The game can be summed up in
the same two words that describe the last three years of college
basketball: LEW ALCINDOR.
Alcindor totally dominated a good Purdue team and if he had a
back pocket on his shorts he could have put the Boilermakers in it.
But that's nothing new, because the big man has been doing that for
UCLA throughout his career.
Alcindor has taken a lot of knocks since he went to UCLA and
its understandable. 'Nobody likes a Goliath, especially one that wins.
People try to downgrade the 7-1 star and say that his heightis all
that he has. Others'maintain that his great teammates make him look
better than he is.
Alcindor has always had the best answer, though. He just goes out
on the court and shows them where it's really at. The Bruins won
three straight NCAA titles, an unprecedented feat, because Alcindor
was the greatest center to ever appear in college.
Bill Russell dominated the collegiate scene while. at San
Francisco but he was all defense. Russell never could shoot to
save his life. Jerry Lucas took Ohio State to the finals for three
consecutive years, but could only get one title. Cincinnati proved
that he could be stopped on offense.
Wilt Chamberlain, the man Alcindor is most compared to, only
made the last round once while at Kansas and was beaten by North
Carolina. Only Big Lew has been able to put together such an unbe-
lieveable record.
Why LewCLA was so overpowering was made evident against
Purdue. Alcindor worked off a low post, took lob passes, and then
either dropped in lay-ups or rolled for his soft hook shot. Sometimes,
seemingly just for fun, he would turn and pop in a short bank shot.
The word unstoppable is overused but for Alcindor it applies. He
combines amazing timing, spring and agility with his great height.
The lob pass is so effective with him because of that timing and spring.
The Bruins don't have to worry about interceptions on the play sim-
ply because of how high Alcindor allows them to throw the pass.
Those who saw Purdue against North Carolina felt that the
Boilermakers could shut off Alcindor as they had Rusty Clark, by
sagging on him. But Alcindor made a mockery out of that idea.
It is an insult to him to even think that stopping Clark is com-
parable. Clark could not get the insidepass because he isn't mo-
bile, he can't jump, he does not have goodytiming or strong hands.
Alcindor has it all, though, and he has always shown it. For three
years people tried to come up with a way to stop him; only two ever
came close. Southern California discovered that UCLA could be beat
with a stall . . . if the Bruins were complacent. Houston realized
Itthat a team with imposing size was needed to stop the juggernaut.
Of course, it helped that Lew had an eye injury at the time.
But now no one has to worry about him anymore, just the Mil-
waukee Bucks, who would like his autograph but will have to pay
dearly to get it. If the Bucks were smart, though, they could probably
get the money very easily. I imagine that there are over a thousand
coaches and players with ulcers that he has left in his wake who would
be glad to contribute to anyone who would take Alcindor away.
If you don't believe that, call George King in Lafayette, In-
diana and ask him for an analysis of the title game. The number
is 317-749-2776. I bet this is one time that King will agree with
me on something.
BATTLE FOR THIRD:
Bulldogs put bite to
Heels in consol ation

4

Totals
UCLA

F G Ti
Shackleford 3-8 5-8 11
Rowe 4-10 4-4 12
Alcindor 15-20 7-9 37
Hleitz 0-3 0-1 0
Vallely 4-9 7-10 15
Wicks 0-1 3-6 3
Sweek 3-3 0-1 6
Patterson 1-1 2-2 4
Schofield 1-2 0-0 2
Selbert 0-0 0-0 0
Farmer 0-0 0-0 0
Eker 1-1 0-0 2
Totals 32-58 28-41 92
Purdue 31 41-72
UCLE 42 50--92
Fouled out-Purdue, Faerber, Kauf-
man
Total fouls-Purdue 30, UCLA 19

MARCH 26

HILL AUD.

Tickets on Sale Now,
SAB

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK - John B a u m
spurred Temple from behind late
in the final half and the o n c e
lightly-regarded O w 1s stunned
favored Boston College 89-76 yes-
terday for the National Invitation-
al Basketball Tournament title.
Baum, a 6-foot-5 jumping jack,
scored 20 of his 30 points in the
final session of the nationally-
televised contest, and it was his
basket that put Temple ahead to
stay 70-69.
T heisenior forward later added
another basket and two free
throws, raising the lead to 82-73,
putting an end to BC's 19-game
winning streak, longest in the
country, and ruining the Eagles
sendoff for retiring Coach B o b
Cousy.
With Tom Veronneau and Jim
O'Brien e a c h scoring 14 points,
and Terry Driscoll, the tourney's
MostnValuable Player, hitting 11
behind the TC fast break, the
Eagles pulled a w a y to a 46-42
halftime lead after nine ties and
11. lead changes.
But Temple, on baskets by Tony.

S2, C, $2.50, $3.00

It Takes
LEATH ER
BALLS
to play BIG TEN
RUGBY
April 12 and 13

INTERNATIONAL

Brocchi, Joe Cromer and Baum,
quickly moved ahead 48-46 at the
start of the last half of this first.
All-East NIT final since 1965.
Driscoll, who scored 18 points
for a four-game total of 96, led
the Eagles back in front. But it
was the 6-foot-7 senior's goal-
tending infraction against Baum
that jumped the Owls back ahead
62-61.
Two baskets by O'Brien and one
by Billy Evans shot the Eagles'
ahead again 67-62 before Eddiel
Mast scored for the 0 w 1s and
Baum added two more field goals
for a 68-67 Temple lead. Then
Driscoll hit before Baum sent the
Owls ahead for good.
Cromer, hitting nine of 13 from
the field and 19 points, and Baum,
who hit 10 of 17 led the Owls to
a 50 per cent shooting percentage
from the floor, while the Eagles
managed only 39.5 as Driscoll hit
only six of 19.1
Temple also outrebounded BC
44-37, with Mast pulling 22 and'
Baum 10. Driscoll had 18 for the
Eagles, who closed at 24-4.
O'Brien matched Driscoll's 18
points and Veronneau and Evans,
who h a d 11 assists, totaled 16
points each.
NEW YORK - Tennessee pull-
ed away early in the second half
behind big Bob Croft and out-
defensed Army 64-52 yesterday in
a lackluster game for third place
in the National Invitation Bas-
ketball Tournament.
The 6-foot-1 Croft, who led all
scorers with 16 points, notched
nine of them during two second
half sprees that clinched Ten-
nessee's 21st victory against seven
defeats. Army closed at 18-10.

0

EMPHASIS

WEEK

DO

( j {) pOCOC)."i =>C
Big Boxes-Little Boxes
Sandalwood
Walnut and Camphor Wood
0 BOXES
3 INDIAART SHOP
0 330 MAYNARD-- Block from Campus

SHARE HOLDERS MEETING

TIlEALTERNATIVE

By The Associated Press'
LOUISVILLE - Swift Willie
McCarter popped in 28 points and
led Drake to. 104-84 victory over
a dispirited North Carolina five
yesterday afternoon in the game
for third place in the National
Collegiate Basketball champion-
ships.
The whippet-lean McCarter was
Young Amnericans
for
Freedom
General Elections
Meeting
Room 3B, Union 3:00 P.M.
Sunday, March 23

the guiding force in Drake's rela-
tively easy victory.
In addition to leading their
scoring, McCarter also wracked
up 10 assists and was one of the
top rebounders against the vast-
ly taller Tar Heels.
A 12-2 Drake scoring burst in
the last 212 minutes of the first
half ripped open a tight game,
staked the Iowans to a 50-39 half-
time edge and the Bulldogs, were
never threatened again.
North Carolina, ranked No. 4 in
the nation, was disorganized "and
listless throughout the game and
was guilty of seven key errors in
the first half alone.
The Tar Heels stayed in it only
through the scoring magic of
Charlie Scott, who finished with
35 points."

STUDENT CO-OP COFFEEHOUSE

"TILE LAST ChAPTER"

TO ORGANIZE
FOR OPENING
THIS TERM

TUESDAY, MARCH 25
8:00
VENDING MACHINE AREA
Basement, MICHIGAN UNION

The Superb Documentary on Polish Jewry

Narrated by THEODORE BIKEL

Sunday, March 23,7 P.M. (Preceded at 6:00 by Deli House)

Movie Admission 75c

(Proceeds to UJA)

4

SPRING IS HERE AND SO IS

HILLEL FOUNDATION

663-4129

1429 HILL ST.

. . .

/_

J
7

SUMMER

S3I

SUBLET
SUPPLEMENTS

S3I

APRIL 11-12

ON SALE NOW for 5c

i

I

I

F

E'

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