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March 22, 1969 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-03-22

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Saturday, March 22, 1969,

Page Three

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

,
,,.
e
h

TOUGHER PENALTIES
Protesters aggravate courts

i

the
news today
by The Associa/cd Press and College Press Service

By The Associated Press
Signs of increasing impati-
ence with student demonstra-
tors are beginning to appear
among the nation's courts, law-
makers, and school officials.
In Los Angeles Thursday, Su-
perior Court Judge Raymond
Choate sentenced three students
from California State College at
Los Angeles to 30 days in jail
for campus vandalism despite
pleas from their lawyers that
they would fail spring courses
and not graduate.
"If this is the case," Judge
Choate said, "then the punish-
ment more properly fits the
crime."
In Columbus, Ohio, Juvenile
Court Judge John Hill sen-
tenced two West High School
students Wednesday to seven
days detention during spring va-
cation as the result of a sit-in at
the school.
A Long Island judge, Edward
U. Green Jr., 39, said Thursday
he thinks he has the answer to
law-breaking campus demon-
strations: "I send them to jail
without making them crimi-
nals."
Judge Green, a Suffolk County
judge, sentenced 21 students
from the State University of

New York at Stony Brook to a
15-day jail term after reducing
their misdemeanor charges,
which carry criminal records,
to simple trespass, which do
not.
Judge Green said he sees no
comparison between campus
protesters and early Americans
who broke English law to found
the nation.r
He declared: "The American
heroes were persecuted, they
went to jail. If the kids want
to be martyrs, let them be ar-
rested and let them go to jail."
Another judge, in Cambridge,
Mass. meted out jail terms
Wednesday ranging from six
months to a year to four men
who invaded a Harvard Univer-
sity class March 11 and broke
up a lecture. A young woman
with them was fined $200.
California legislators have
filed about 70 bills in Sacramen-
to, most of them aimed at giv-
ing administrators greater au-
thority over students and facul-
ty members involved in demon-
strations and disorders.
Iowa state senators have in-
troduced a bill that would re-
quire summary dismissal of stu-
dents and faculty members in-

volved in disorders on state uni-
versity campuses - without 0,
hearing,
Four other Iowa senators,
reacting to this move by 32 of
the 61 senators, proposed Thu s-
day an amendment providing
that the university president or
his duly appointed representa-
tive "shall be empowered to
club the students until they di-
vulge their names."
The University of California
has issued substantial crack-
down instructions that include
provisions for the rare use of
expulsion, which is final, rather
than just dismissal, which al-
lows a student to return if he
merits re-admission.
Pennsylvania State Universi-
ty, however, announced Thurs-
day an experiment with labor
mediation, saying that Theodore
W. Kneel, noted New York City
mediator, will visit the school
April 2.
Four faculty members at the
University of Connecticut, scene
of several protests against cam-
pus job recruiting by defense in-
dustries and government agen-
cies, have been the object of
university discipline.
In one action,, the university

r

THE ALTERNATIVE

presents

- board of trustees voted not to
renew the contract of an asso-
ciate professor of sociology be-
119" 4//cause a f a c u lt y committee
IZ t eop Ye;recommended his dismissal. The
committee said he intended to
Chamber Theater- obstruct a campus Job interview
the poetry and prose last Nov. 25.
CARL SANDBURG t The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
transfigured for the stage aged by students of the University of
trnfgrdfovh tg Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
piece: ALICE'S RESTAURANT Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michi-
date: Sundy, March 23, 7:00 P.M. gan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
drate: S a MMichigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sponsored by the Markley Library sity year. Subscription rates: $9 by
3 carrier, $10 by mail.
I urday, March 29, 8:30 at Hill tA I aTie I
The Michigan Men's Glee Club VI hO and Tail I

2V2 Hours of Film

NAT. SCI. AUDITORIUM

FRI. & SAT. Only One Dollar
7:30rand 10:00 P.M.
THE COMEDY GREATS-Program 1
W.C. FIELDS-"The Pharmacist"
MARX BROS.-" Incredible Jewel Robbery"-pantomine
LAUREL AND HARDY-"Big Business"-one of their really great ones and one of
the wildest comic destruction scenes ever filmed. "It will drive you mad."
"THE GREAT CHASE"-Uproarious! 60 years of great movie chases. Featuring
Douglas Fairbanks, William S. Hart, Perils of Pauline, 30 minutes of Buster
Keaton's greatest comedy epic THE GENERAL.
"HAPPY ANNIVERSARY"-Highly creative, experimental French comedy-Aca-
demy Award, winner of Oberhausen Film Festival, 1963.

E

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Presents
ORCHESTRA MICHELANGELO
di FIRENZE

I

THE NIXON ADMINISTRATION is reportedly ready
to begin a nationwide crackdown on campus disorders.
Rep. RomanC. Pucinski of Illinois announced yesterday
that the current administration plans to enforce a statute
barring interstate travel to incite riots and a law withholding
federal aid to students taking part in violent disorders.
The plan drafted Tuesday at a meeting between Presi-
dent Nixon, Atty. Gen. John Mitchell and Robert Finch would
also "prosecute a group of radicals which is known to have
moved from campus to campus stirring students to violent
dissent."
The interstate travel law was used for the first time
Thursday when eight hippie and yippie leaders were indicted
on charges arising from the street disorders during the Demo-
cratic national convention last August.
STUDENTS FOR A DEMOCRATIC SOCIETY officials
were told yesterday not to hold their national convention
in Albuquerque, N.M.
, Both the city manager of Albuquerque and the president
'of the University of New Mexico officially rejected SDS plans
for the convention when they cancelled contracts for the use
of convention' halls in the city and on the campus.
In Austin, Texas, meanwhile, law students filed a court
suit to block the University of Texas' earlier decision to pre-
vent SDS from holding its convention on the Texas campus.
s . *
KENNETH KEATING, former New York senator, will
become U.S. ambassador to India.
Keating, who will reportedly assume the p os t in two
months, will replace Chester Bowles, who has held the post
for the last six years.
Keating was also being considered for ambassador to Is-
rael, but the State Department decided the tense Middle East
situation required a career diplomat.
. . *
GEN. FRANCISCO FRANCO yesterday signed a de-
cree lifting Spain's state of emergency.
The decree, which will take effect next Tuesday, ends
the rights of the police to arrest persons without warrants,
to exile suspected subversives and to forcefully suppress all
dissent.
The announcement ends early the martial measures
which began on January 24 and were to last 90 days.
ARMY PHYSICIANS yesterday expressed grave con-
cern over former president Dwight P. Eisenhower's con-
dition.
The doctors at Walter Reed Army hospital were concern-
ed because of the occurence of a congestive heart failure suf-
fered by the general last Saturday but not reported until yes-
terday.
Congestive heart failure is a condition in w h I c h the
chambers of the heart do not empty completely.
The doctors said such a condition is particularly serious
in Eisenhower's case in view of the type of heart attacks the
general has suffered in the past.
Presents
NO. 5
by Yoko Ono
TWO VIRGINS
by John Lennon and Yoko Ono
PLUS
Mr. Lennon requests that the
audience bring their own In-
struments to create the sound
for No. 5. "
TUES., March 25 75c ARCHITECTURE
7, 8 and 9 P.M. 662-8871 AUDITORIUM

LUIL
StrdyndSdy
THEBLUEANGEL

TICKETS:
$2.50, $2.00, $1.50
BLOCK SALES-Thurs., Fri., March 20-21
GENERAL SALES-Start Mon., March 24,
Hill Aud. Box Office
MAIL ORDERS--Men's Glee Club,
6044 Admin. Bldg.

-

in RACKHAM AUDITORIUM

Sunday, March 23, 8:30
PROGRAM
Sin fonia in C major ..............................................Pugnani
Sin fonia Concertante in G major.................................GCambini
La Musica Notturna delle Strade di Madrid ........ .. .............Boccherini
Concertone; in E-flat major ............................. ..............Sarti
Ricercare a sei "Dali'of ferta Musicale"............... . . ..... ........Bach
Sin fonia in D major......................... . . . Diters von Dittersdorf
Sestetto Op. 70...... ....... ....... ............. . .. Tchaikovsky
TICKETS: $5.00, $4.00, $2.00
UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY, BURTON TOWER, ANN ARBOR
Office Hours: Mon. thru Fri. 9 to 4:30, Sat., 9 to 12 (Telephone 665-3717)
(Also at Auditorium box office 11/2 hours before performance time)

11

ELECTRA RECORDING ARTIST
DAVIDACKLS,
Will Perform at
"The Atmosphere Was Sowehow Electric!"
-ANN ARBOR NEWS
Free Food Yes! Tonife & Sunday
$2.00 AT THE DOOR ($1.50 after 2nd set) DOORS QPEN 8:00 P.M.

it

BIG RECORD SALE!
SUNDAY, MARCH 23--12 Noon to 5 P.M.
0
iscount records, INC.
300 S. STATE-1235 S. UNIVERSITY
Our ENTIRE Stock* of

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Thousands of Records

Were 4.98
NOW 19

Were 5.98
NOW 399

on Sale
Were 6.98
NoW4 67

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U I Utu t 1t1 V i1G f1

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