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March 21, 1969 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-03-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pag

_ _ _

Pace .

PROTEST ENDED:
ADC demonstrators
change trespass plea

By SAM DAMREN
Thirteen persons arrested last
September during a sit-in at the
County Bldg. to protest the treat-
ment of welfare mothers pleaded
"no lo contendre" yesterday to
charges of trespassing.
Sentence will be pronounced
Plan teach-in
for poli sci
(Continued-from Page 1)
agreed to voice strong objection
to two alternate plans for student
representation in faculty decision-
making.
One, include1 in the report of
the Joint Faculty-Graduate Stu-
dent Committee issued Monday,
would allow student representa-
tives to attend some meetings of
the faculty and the executive,
committee but would give them no
vote.'
Another would divide the execu-
tive 'committee into two parts.
One part would deal with person-
nel decisions and the other with
policy.
This plan would allow students
to vote only on the policy making
part of the executive committee.
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April 18. Maximum penalty is 90
days in jail and/or $100 fine.
The defendants had previously
entered a plea of not guilty, ac-
cording to Stuart Katz, Grad, but
changed their plea for monetary
reasons and because "we have
exhausted our forms of protest."
Katz said the large amount of
money needed to stage a jury trial
would not be worth "the few words
we could say in court."
Charles A. Barr, the defendants
lawyer, said the plea of "no to
contendre" only indicates "the
students conceed they can't win
not that they are guilty."
Although the student trespass-
ing trials have been limited to
"the narrow- forum.of the county
circuit court," said Barr, he said
he feels the protest was success-
ful since the trials of the welfare
mothers have been appealed to
"the larger forums of the federal
district courts."
Richard Gordon one of the ae-
fendants, said to the court: "I
feel our protest was, political, and
the substance of the protest was
the 200 people who were arrested,
but since the court has broken
that number down into smaller
groups to be tried we have lost the
political impact of 200 people pro-
testing."
The students were: Ronald Co-
hen, Grad, Juidy Cohen, '71. Isaac
Welsh, '68, Thomas Zimmerman,
'70, Harry Finklestien, Grad, 'Ellen.
Frank, '69, Ida Altman, '71, Stuart
Katz, Grad.
.

SDS bi
By HAROLD ROSENTHAL
About 150 people attended a
teach-in on "Militarism and the
University" held by Students for
a Democratic Society in the Un-
ion Ballroom last night.
The teach-in was part of an
SDS program against militar-
ism on campus. The program is
being carried out on campuses
across the nation.
Martin Nicoulas, a writer for
the Movement and former edi-
tor of "Viet Report" said "Even
the older generation is begin-
ning to have doubts about what
it lived for."
"Ourparents went abroad
with the intent of overthrowing
a series of governments whose
leaders espoused a racist ideol-
ogy, used military force, showed
a high dedication to capitalist
ideas and waged wars to support
these," he said. "They are now
seeing the reappearance of this
here."
Nicolaus added, "The task
that faces us is overthrowing

the capitalist system and re-
placing it with our own."
Because this "system relies on
violence and force we can't
overthrow the government with
rallies and teach-ins," he said.
Referring to ROTC, Nicolaus
claimed universities "have been
the breeding grounds for 50
per cent of the officers in the
army."
Officers favor war because it
benefits them, he said. "We
can intervene in a vicious circle
by stopping this program."
Nicolaus also said, due to the
war less money is being spent
on education and, that this has
caused changes in the educa-
tion process.
The universities have to "adopt
industrial methods" and "are
becoming more like factories."
Tom Horwitz, a member of
SDS at Columbia, said, "ideal-.
ism is a tool that makes you
not deal with reality."
"The . peace movement has
turned into a war movement

lasts militarism

and there is no room for ideal-
ism in a war," h, said.
"We can't sit here and think
about abstract ideals when we
know this place is rotten, he
said. "We have to go out and
fight along with the people."
"When thet ampus movement
ties in with the people's move-
ment you can't cut it off," he
added.
Earlier Jim Mellen, a region-
al SDS worker, said, "The U.S.
economy is a monopoly economy
controlled by only a few com-
panies.,
"Capitalism," he said, "needs
high military technology and
high military spending to ab-
sorb surplus capital."
Another place surplus capi-
tal is spent is in education. "The
university is, now used to make
people to be productive units,"
he said.
"College also delays entrance
of students into the labor force,"
he said, reducing its size. The
fact that it is handling human
beings doesn't bother capitalism.

I

----------

Tenants win first eviction ease;
'may set favorable precedent

I

, (Continued from Page 1)
The total rent which the Ro-
sen's put into escrow was $300.,
If the jury had voted in favor of
Arbor Management they would
have received this total plus twen-
ty-five dollars in court costs, This,
comes to a sum that is presumably;
far less than the money spent on
the lawyer.
Though members of the steer-
ing committee felt this particular
case was a rather minor one and
did not contain as many code via-
latio's and unremedied complains
as others, it ended up carrying
more weight than was suspected,
said Dale Berry, Grad, a member
:f the steering committee.

Berry felt that the case had
become a precedent. "Specifically
the verdict shows there is a great
deal of sympathy for the strike
in the community at large. For the
rent strike as a Whole indicates
that people can strike. They will
be brought into court and then
receive appropriate rent reduc-
tions," he added. .
"The jury reduced the Rosen's
rent ($20 in total) because they
didn't feel Kloian was deservant
of $150 a month," Berry said.
Rosen said, "We're pretty happy
with the verdict." He felt that the
procedure had taken up a lot of
time and money on the part of the
landlords while his own expenses

Cycles sellI
in Classifieds

had been paid throuhg the R e n t
Strike fund.
At the beginning of the strike,
according to Rosen, he had de-
posited 10 per cent of his rent
or $15 into the' fund. In receiving
the twenty dollar reduction from
.his own rent he made five dollars.
He felt he "helped to establish a.
very important precedent and a
very important victory for the
rent strike."
Harris "hits
tax ,system
(Continued from Page 1)
the city would collect, for the first
time, $400,0001in new money by
taxing the Ann Arbor income of
non-residents.
"The fiscal reform would be
fairer, too, particularly for large
families and persons in their el-
derly years," Harris said.
"We can embark on an era with
new and different outlooks," said
Balzhiser, "but it takes cooperatior.
fromI business, labor, church and
univrsity."
It is this "coalition of concern"
that will enable all the necessary
legislation to be, passed that "will
make things a reality."
"Important bridges must be
built to avoid tension,"- said Balz-
hiser. "We ;must harness energy to
constructively make change."

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