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March 21, 1969 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-03-21

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Thre.

Friday, March 21, 1969

"Safety belts? Not if
I'm just going down to
the supermarket."
--Kathlen Farrell
(1943.1968)
"Safety belts? They
just make me nervous.
Besides, they wrinkle
your clothes."
-Louis Claypool
(1931-1968)
"Who can ever
remember to use the
darned things ?"
--Gordon Fenton
(1921-1968)
What's yourexcuse?

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SABOTAGE PREVENTION

Railroads tighten arms security

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WASHINGTON YP)-The na-
tion's railroads, under threat
of sabotage from anti-Vietnam
war groups, have placed the
tightest security precautions in
history on shipments of muni-
tions and military supplies.
The new safeguards, drawn
up jointly by military and rail-
road representatives, resulted
from what FBI Director J. Ed-
gar Hoover termed "a marked
increase" in acts of sabotage
against government installa-
tions:
Government officials have in-
dicated rail shipments of Viet-
nam-bound material have been
listed as prime targets by some
antiwar groups who have threat-
ened to use force to impede the
war effort.
A railway spokesman said the
threats, along with reported
"isolated incidents" of interfer-
ence with defense shipments, led
to the elaborate anti-sabotage
steps.
The new rail security proce-
dures include:
-Sending trains laden with
munitions and defense supplies
through isolated areas and gen-
erally at night.
-Varying routing so patterns
cannot be detected in defense
shipments. In fact, many are
routed over a much longer dis-
tance than necessary in order to
avoid detection.
-Triple sealing doors of box
cars containing explosives be-
fore shipment.
-Careful inspections of rail-
way track and facilities near
Wilmington, N.C., and Oakland,
Calif. - primary embarcation

points for Vietnani-bound sup-
plies.
When boxcars arrive at their
destination, a railway spokes-
man said, the shipments are not
touched until a military inspec-
tor checks the seals..
If there is any sign of tamper-
ing, the boxcar' is isolated and
its contents thoroughly inspect-
ed before being transferred to
ships.
The railroad spokesman said
this procedure is necessary to
guard against the possibility
that an explosive would be rig-
ged to detonate during shipment
to Vietnam.
Hoover says "terrorist activi-
ties" against government instal-
lations primarily have involved
attacks on Reserve Officers
Training Corps and Selective
Service facilities.

But there have been cases-
the FBI says it has no exact fig-
ures-of sabotage against utility
towers serving defense plants.
And a railway source reported
that a cache of small arms was
stolen recently from a boxcar at
the Army's Aberdeen, Md.,
proving grounds.
Government officials, cautious
in discussing suspected sabotage
because of fears of triggering an
alarxmist reaction from the pub-
lic, say the outbreaks show on-
ly "a marked increase" and are
not a wave of terrorist activi-
ties.
Hoover traces the incidents to
last June when the Students for
a Democratic Society, a mili-
tant leftist youth group, held its
national convention at Michi-
gan State University.
At that time, the FBI director

said, th6 SDS conducted a work-'
shop on sabotage and explo-
sives.
"It was only a short time aft-
er this convention," he de-
clared, "that the wave of bomb-
ing and arson occurred through-
out the country."
Despite investigating numer-
ous cases, only two indictments
have been returned.
Hoover has reported that
blueprints for bombing govern-
ment installations have been
disseminated in some publica-
tions by militant anti-war
groups.
Contending that sabotage is
"the next logical step toward
destruction and disruption of
the U.S. war machine," one
pamphlet contains instructions
acid detailed diagrams foi mak-
ing incendiary bombs.

Administration to prosecute
disruptive campus protesters

WASHINGTON (CPS) - The
Nixon administration clearly in-
tends to prosecute and punish
disruptive campus protesters, but
the President has decided not
to make the announcement
himself.
Instead he has handed the
assignment to Robert H. Finch,
Secretary of Health, Education,
and Welfare. The White House
had earlier announced that Nixon
would issue a statement on stu-
dent unrest, but the President
apparently was persuaded not .to

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involve himself in this sensitive
area. Atty. Gen. John N. Mitch-
ell will see that "militant activ-
ists" be prosecuted if they con-
spire, or cross state lines, to
provoke riots.
While members of the admin-
stration were deciding what to
do or not to do, the House high-
er education subcommittee re-
cently re-open d hearings on
campus disorders.
Rep. Edith Green- (D-Ore)
and her colleagues heard a
spokesman for Gov. Ronald
Reagan and the head of the
California State College board,
of trustees. The subcommittee is
attempting to clear up confu-
sion surrounding amendments
to the Higher Education, Act of
1968.
Under this law, financial aid
provided by the federal govern-
ment may be cut off if a univer-
sity determines !that a student
participated in "serious dis-
ruptions" or was convicted of
a crime resulting from a pro-
test.
This version allows the school
some discretion.. A provision of
the General Appropriations Act,
however, under which aid money
is provided, requires that aid be
cut off.
College administrators haven't
known what to do and under
the Johnson administration no
- - - -

one told them. In fact, then-4
secretary of HEW Wilbur Co-
hen issued a memo saying the
aid cut-off was unjust.
The Green committee is in-
vestigating to see if a clarifica-
tion should be written into the
law, or whether the rule should
be relaxed.
There is some sentiment in
the committee which reflects
the general feeling of college of-
ficials: The government should
let the universities individually
decide appropriate punishment,
if any, for protests.
Others feel the government
cansand should attach restric-
tions on money it gives to col-
leges because they think campus
disruptions shouldn't be "sub-!
sidized."
California's Gov. Ronald Rea-
gan clearly thinks the govern-
ment should interyene. At the
recent National Governors con-
ference he proposed a federal in-
vestigatron into campus unrest,
claiming a conspiracy.
Reagan, in a statement read
to the committee, said he "wel-
comes' aid cut-off provisions if
they are fair and effective. He
called them "abdeterrent," and
said it may be necessary for
them to be "absolutely man-
datory so they can't be thwarted
because of pressure on admin-
strators or by current admin-
istrative style."
He stressed "effectiveness,"~
saying "an escalation of threats
with no concern for action leads
to an escalation of violence
with no concern for results."
Teodore Meriam, chairman
of the State College trustees,
said he "is interested in sup-
porting a general philosophy
which encourages faculty and
administrative responsibility on
our campuses. We should pro-
vide them with the discretionj
and flexibility necessary to car-
ry out their function."
Hie said, however, that !Con-
gress "not only has the right,
but the obligation to spell out
in clear terms their intent that
federal funds may be denied to
students or faculty guilty of
misconduct.
3The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students of the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michi-
gan, '420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,_
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $9 by
carrier, $10 by mail.

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
HUNDREDS OF ANGUILLANS protested yesterday.
against British occupation of their country.
British troops and police seized control of Anguilla, a tiny
African island, Wednesday.
Anguilla had been part of the self-governing British col-
ony of St. Kitts-Nevis-Anguilla until it withdrew from the
federation in May, 1967. It declared its independence earlier
this year.
British Foreign Secretary Michael Stewart told the House
of Commons that Anguilla's secession might inspire other is-
lands to break away from British-sponsored federations.
A major objection to Britain's action refers to an incon-
sistency with the government's policy towards Rhodesia.
The current invasion has touched off demands by black
Africans that Britain apply the same policy to Rhodesia's
white government.
* 9 9
THE PARIS PEACE TALKS passed through their
ninth session of full scale talks yesterday.
" U.S. representatives reported t h e meeting contributed
little toward the search for peace in Vietnam, The brief ses-
sion was once again marked by accusations by each side that
the other was intensifying the war'.
South Vietnamese Ambassador Pham Dang Lam warned
the North Vietnamese, and the National Liberation Front to
refrain from engaging in "a hopeless attack on Saigon."
President Nixon said recently the U.S. would be forced to
take "appropriate response" if the offensive continues.
However, Xan Thuy, head of the North Vietnamese dele-
gation yesterday called Nixon's warning a "threat of escala-
tion."
MOB RIOTING in East Pakistan has left 150 dead and
thousands homeless.
The disorders of the past ten days were set in motion by
an ultimatum from students last month calling for the resig-
nation of all "basic democrats" in the province.
The "basic democrats" form the lower echelon of Presi-
dent Mohammed Ayub Khan's regime.
In response to the disruption, Law Minister Syed Zafar
said the National Assembly would be convened within a month
to consider constitutional changes altering Pakistan's form-
of government.
Proposed changes include establishing the first free one-
man, one-vote elections in the nation's 21 year old history.
U.S. FIGHTER PLANES attempted to save the Pueblo
before it was seized by North Korea, a military spokesman
disclosed yesterday.
The planes were sent from Okinawa to attack North
Korean MIG's and gunboats when they surrounded the ill-
fated vessel.
However, by the time the planes arrived, the spokesman
said, the sun had set, barring any assistance from the air.
. . 0
SECRETARY OF DEFENSE Melvin Laird yesterday
defended the proposed ABM system before a Senate Com-
mittee.
Testifying at hearings of the Armed Services Committee,
Laird said the missile network was crucial to the United
States' ability to respond to a Soviet attack.
Calling the proposed ABM network "a building block for.
peace," Laird said he did not believe the Soviets would agree
to a freeze on their anti-missile system unless the U.S. went
ahead with Sentinel deployment.
THE UNITED STATES yesterday called for South A-
rica to withdraw from Southwest Africa.
Charles Yost, U.S. ambassador to the United Nations said
his delegation would vote for a pending security council reso-
lution calling for immediate withdrawal.
South Africa seized Southwest Africa from Germany dur-
ing World War I, and claimed it afterwards under a League
of Nations mandate.
PRESIDENT NIXON is expected to ask Congress for
sweeping changes in the administration of foreign aid.
According to Michigan State University President John
Hannah, who will direct the foreign aid program, the pro-
posals will include the establishment of a quasi-governmental
corporation to oversee foreign assistance.

The corporation will seek the aid of private investment
in improving the economies of underdeveloped countries.
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paid. Must be able-to start work by 1 May 69! Must
be 20 years of age (preferably older). Must furpish
references. Company will hire 10 male students.

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