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January 14, 1969 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1969-01-14

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Tuesday, January 14, 1959'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

I' f;

Page Thre

. . ,

The most complete
supply of
NEW and USED TEXTS
and PAPERBACKS
is at the
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COME TO
Student Book Service
and visat
NEFF
WELLIN
SQUIRREL

ONE AGENCY
Ocean commission urges reforms

the
news toda
by The Associated Press wnd Collcge Press Service

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DAILY CLASSIFIEDS I
BRING QUICK RESULTS

NATIONAL 6ENERAL CORPORATION
HELD OVE FOX EASTERN THEATRES "
4TH WEEK FOX VILLaGE
375 No. MAPLE RD.-769-1300

MON.-FRL
7:00-9:20
SAT.-SUN.
2:00-4:20-
6:45-9:10

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Join Num -on aerM W=Rngo Stw ir. #, wEmAurn.
PsosUdrf to ot Candy Technicofor6 VR
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S WASHINGTON OP)- A spec-
ial presidential commission has
urged a vastly augmented, re-
organized national program in
ocean science and technology-
to help advance America's econ-
omy.
The proposal features crea-
tion of a new, high-level federal
agency, absorbing six old ones,
and would cost taxpayers at
least $16 billion by 1980 alone-
double the rate of present out-
lays for the marine fields cov-
ered.
The envisioned program-a de-
cision on it might prove a hot
potato for the incoming Nixon
administration - would include:
Ventures ranging from new
and more daring explorations
for mineral and other treasures
of the deep sea to equipping
high-soaring satellites with ad-
vanced automatic snoopers on
oceanic and atmospheric con-
ditions.
Expanded efforts to aid Amer-
ica's fishermen, help tap new
food riches from the sea to aid
the planet's hungry, curb man-
made pollution of the oceans
and atmosphere and maintain
the quality of the nation's vast
coastal zones.
The call for programs came
from the 15-member Commis-

was appointed by President
Johnson about two years ago
to appraise the nation's stake in
the' sea and to draft a new
strategy for best benefitting
from its potential resources.
But the proposal might prove
difficult for Nixon-or for any
administration - to implement
for this reason:
The group's most sweeping
recommendation calls for reorg-
anization of the entire federal
complex of agencies now dealing
separately with marine and re-
lated affairs - a spread-out
termed by the commission as an
inefficient "scattering of ef-
fort."
Specifically, the commission
urged establishment of a major
and independent civilian agen-
cy-to be known as the National
Oceanic and Atmospheric Agen-
cy (NOAA) - which w ould
immediately absorb and admin-
ister the functions of t h e s e
agencies, which employ some
55,000 people.
The Treasury Department's
U.S. Coast Guard; the Com-
merce Department's Environ-
mental Science Services Admin-
istration, (ESSA), including the
Weather Bureau: the Bureau of
Commercial Fisheries; the Na-
tional Sea Grant Program; the

U.S. Lake Survey, presently
operated by the Army Corps of
Engineers; and the National
Oceanographic Data Center.
Declaring that the combined
annual budgetary funding of
those agencies now totals $773
million, the commission recom-
mended steadily raising t h e
ante for the proposed new agen-
cy until it peaks at about $2 bil-
lion by 1980. Under the pro-
posal, containing scores of spe-
cific recommendations - the
new agency would combine the
fleets of ESSA, the Coast Guard
and the Bureau of Fisheries -
a total of 320 seagoing ships -
into a superfleet for the col-
lection of marine and atmos-
pheric data.
It also would combine m a n y
existing marine research labo-
ratories - and other proposed
new ones - into a major re-
search arm with capabilities
and facilities that would be
global and applicable to any en-
vironment above, on and below
the planet's oceans."
The commission indicated
that proposed new or expanded
research and development pro-
grams backed by NOAA might
well prove of value to those de-
fense programs involving the
oceans and atmospheric.

Dr. Julius A. Stratton. chair-
man of the Ford Foundation and
a former president of the Mas-
cashusetts Institute of Technol-
ogy, heads the commission. He
said copies of the report had
been given to aides to Presi-
dent-elect Nixon but t h a t no
reaction had come from Nixon
headquarters.
Stratton also said that direct-
ing officials of the agencies that
would be absorbed by NOAA
had voiced neither approval nor
disapproval of the proposal. But
he said it could "realistically"
be expected that such officials
might remain staunch protago-
nists of their agencies' present
independence.
He added, though, "we will
leave it to the next administra-
tion" to decide whether the plan
should be carried out.
The group said thlat, while its
expenditure recommendations
for the civil program covered
only federal outlays, "com-
mensurate investment to build
the systems needed to harvest
the sea's resources, and state
and local governments will need
to commit additional funds to
meet their responsibilities un-
der the commission's recom-
mended plan."

RC

sion on marine cience, Engin-
eering and Resources. The group 0 l
protest for
WASHINGTON (CPS) - T h e sensu
National Mobilization Committee terfe
to End the War in Vietnam is said.
planning a peaceful protest "V
akes against the inauguration of Rich- want
ard Milhous Nixon. ment
Rennie Davis, Mobe coordinator, Davi
says federal and city officials sin- thing
cerely want to avoid "another inaug
yOU Chicago," and will allow the Chica
"counter-inauguration" to be held Pa
the weekend of the "real" one. leade
The protest's purpose is to "dis- Viet
rupt the inauguration's political sary1
at message of national unity by ex- augu
posing Nixon's papier-mache con-- tiona
_ Dar
+ OUSE gurat
anti-z
could
cheap pecte
Mon-Fri. 11:30-1:30 cake-coffee-rolls tooI! from
Ends Thursday ticula
Them

plans non-violent'
ixoll inauguration

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MUST IT
[APpEN
ONCE,
TO
EVERyONE.?

RADICAL CAUCUS

GENERAL MEETING

COdUMb5iA
PICTURES
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bARbARA IERRIS
4 TEbin TER-sWEET
LOVE STORY of
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MARRiEd MAN
COLUMBiACOLOR 91(0)) SMA?

Socie
and
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catior
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but t
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us," but not to physically in-
re with the event itself, Davis
iolence, which we do not
, would not serve the govern-
t's purposes either," said
s. "I should think the last
g Nixon wants on the day he's
gurated would be another
ago."
ul Potter, another M o b e
r, said the "gravity" of the
nam war has made it neces-
to break the tradition of in-
rations as celebrations of na-
al unity.
vis expects the counter-inau-
tion to be the "most critical"
war demonstration yet but
d give no estimate of the ex-
ed turnout. He said response
the campuses has been par-
Arly good, and cited support
150 peace organizations.
1e Students for a Democratic
ty, usually the most active
militant group in demonstra-
, voted in its National Coun-
neeting during Christmas va
)n not to participate in the
onstration on a formal basis;
he Mobe expects many S D S
ents in Washington on an in-
lual basis.
tivities will begin Saturday
conferences and workshops
ned to activate people new to
antiwar movement. The meet-
are scheduled to be held at
thorne School in Southwest
hington. Federal City College,
city's new college with a ma-
y of black students where the
ings were originally schedul-
Tithdrew permission after the
nt government expressed dis-
with the protest.
brief rally is planned at the
re near the White House the

next day (Jan. 19), followed by a
march led by G.I.s along the in-
augural route. Exact details of all
events are subject to the approval
of federal and city officials.
Sunday night, a counter-inaug-
ural ball with entertainment is
planned. Potter says Judy Collins,
Phil Ochs and the Fugs will ap-
pear. Yippies plan guerrilla thea-
tre; one report has it that they
will be in- town handing identical
facsimiles of Inaugural Ball tick-
ets to people on the street "for
those who are into real guerrilla
theatre."
Monday, the day of the Inaug-
ural Ceremony, Mobe intends to
"totally dominate" the p a r a d e
route, according to Davis. Peace
pennants will be available, and
protestors have been encouraged
to bring banners and signs. "We
want to be sure Nixon knows there
is an anti-war movement in this
country," said Potter. I
Davis says people sympathetic
to the antiwar movement will also
make their feelings known at of-
ficial inaugural functions. "There
are even people with $25 box seats
(for the parade) who will hold
peace pennants."
For the counter-in ugural par-
ade, a reviewing stand with barb-
ed wire and barricades will be set
up. President-elect Nixon and his
Cabinet will be invited to use it.
Potter considers the "real" in--
augural, with its elite in fancy
dress amid pomp and circum-
stance, is "hardly a cross-section
of who this nation is." The coun-
ter-inauguration on the other
hand, will "point to the vitality of
the protest movement" and will be
a better indication of the nation,"
he said.

THE SUPREME COURT rejected yesterday a plea
that it outlaw the draft deferment of college students as
economic discrimination against young men who cannot
afford to go to college.
The attack on the regulations was made by four draft age
blacks.
Their lawyers said the deferment system increases the
liklihood that a poor youth will be drafted and is an arbitrary,
unconstitutional classification.
THE SUPREME COURT decided yesterday to give a
thorough airing of Adam Clayton Powell's exclusion from
the House.
In a decision which could put the court on a collision
course with Congress the court shifted the case from the sum-
mary calendar, where argument is limited to 30 minutes for
each side to the general calendar where it can run an hour
or more.
The granting of the original hearing brought an angry
outcry from many congressmen who felt that a decision seat-
ing Powell would be a breach of the constitutional doctrine
of division of power.
THE 10 PER CENT INCOME SURTAX will be contin-
ued if Congress acts favorably on a recommendation by
President Johnson to retain it.
The surtax will be necessary if Johnson is to leave Presi-
dent-elect Nixon a balanced budget.
The Johnson move has the apparent support of Nixon.
During the past two weeks Johnson has tried to get a public
commitment from Nixon. Nixon, who called for an end to the
levy during the presidential campaign, has made no such
pledge.
Congress had decreed the tax, which currently yields
about $13 billion a year, would end next"June 30.
The recommendation is expected in Johnson's State of
the Union message tonight.
" * -
BLACK STUDENTS .at Brandeis University are still
holding the communications center as attempts continue
to resolve the crisis there.
The blacks took over the building in an attempt to force
the school to accept a list of demands including control of a
proposed Afro-American studies center.
The administration and the black students have been
discussing ground rules for negotiation by sending" notes to
each other but are still deadlocked.
The student council this weekend voted not, to have a
strike on the grounds that it was presently not' in their best
interest.
It was reported that there are no indications of the ad-
ministration considering calling in the police.
AN AGREEMENT has been reached between the Oil
Chemical and Atomic Workers Union and the Union Oil
Co. that could settle a nationwide oil strike.
The agieement covers refineries in Los Angeles and San
Francisco, but historically a settlement with one company
has resulted in a nationwide agreement.
Nearly 60,000 workers walked off their jobs in 24 states
10 days ago over a union demand for a 75-cent-an-hour wage'
increase. The agreement gives 69.6 cents-an-hour.
THE THREAT OF A NATIONWIDE STRIKE by rail-
road engineers forced President Johnson to set up two
emergency boards yesterday.
The effect of the boards' creation is to halt any walkout
for 60 days. Under the Railway Labor Act such boards have
30 days to investigate and make reports and there can be no.
change in employment status for the following 30 days.
The dispute is over pay and various operating procedures
and benefits.
CLAY L. SHAW will go to trial on Jan. 21 on charges
of conspiring to assassinate President John F. Kennedy.
Judge Edward A. Haggerty cleared the way for the trial
yesterday by rejecting defense motions to halt the trial or
move it out of New Orleans.
The motion to quash the indictment questioned the con-
stitutionality of the state law under which Shaw is charged
and the rule by which only nine of 12 jurors must vote guilty
to obtain a conviction.
UWhen In Southern California visit Universal Ciy Studios
An unsurpassed cast in one
of the great plays of the ages...
Now on the screen!

Discussion of programs and activities for the

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