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March 20, 1969 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-03-20

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Thursday, March 20, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Si

ThurdayMarc 20,1969THE ICHIAN DILY age

, COUNTING ERRORS:
Confusion on vote
(Continued from Page 1) Keats and Livingston are present-
In the races for at-large SGC ly council members.
seats, the apparent winners 'were If any other ticket wins neither'
Carol Hollenshead, '71, Pbinther Scott nor Kane will take council
White, '69, Shelly Kroll, '72, Joan seats.
Shemel, '70, and Darryl Gorman,: Mike Farrel, '70, won the literary
'71. college senior class presidency,
If the winners of the presiden- beating out Panther White by 21,
tial and vice presidential races are votes.
present Council members, their However, White said early this
seats will be given, for one se- morning he plans to challenge the
mester, to the defeated candidates I validity of the results.
receiving the next largest number "One third of the total ballots
of votes. cast were marked with votes for
Thus if Miller and Rosenbaum, senior class president," White said.
both present Council member, win, "These votes could not have all
William Scott, '71, and Michael I come from the present junior
Kane, '68, will take their vacant class."
seats. Pete Newell, '71, was erected to
If Roger Keats and Kay Stans- a seat on the Board in Control of
bury or Nelson and Livingston win Intercollegiate elections.
the presidential race, Scott, but Larry Deitch, '69 was the winner
nqt Kane will receive a seat since Iin the race for the graduate seat
_ _ _..-on the Board for Student Publica-
tions.
Presidential candidates Bob Nel-
Students son and Marty McLaughlin have
asked the credentials and Rules
Committee to thoroughly review
the campaign budget of candidate
Howard Miller.
support
According to McLaughlin, the
investigation will determine ;if
Miller spent more money on his
campaign than the election rules
allow. ,
(Continued from Page 1) Miller denied the charge, and
in preparing the ballot ,mad1e this said he will supply the committee
with documentary evidence, that
imnpossible. his budget "is entirely ti order."
K Outgoing SGC President Mi.- Under the SGC election rules,
chael Koeneke said yesterday he a candidate may sepnd no more
thought pending faculty action than $45 above the initial fee of
"will still be affected by the re- $15.

I0
BSU asks
new board
(Continued from Page 1)
meeting between BSU members
and Daily senior editors, t h e
blacks said the Daily has an "un-
democratic" editorial policy. Dur-I
ing a Diag rally Tuesday, Thomp-
son charged the Daily "just re-
presents the views of rl moral
misfits."
This is the complete text of the
BSU statement.
"The Black.Student Union in a
letter to President Fleming on
Sunday, March 16, 1969 asked for
for an investigation of the sen-
sationalist, racist attitude of The
Daily and further that publication
be stopped until the investigation
had been aced upon. It is our
opinion that The Daily does not
nor does it intend to ever repre- 1
sent the interests of anyone on
this campus . but the 11 senior
editors. If The Daily was owned
by the 11 editors then our alter-
native would be simple, not read
it: However, The Daily is owned
by the Regents of this University.
In other words, The Daily is just
as much as ours as it is the 11
other senior editors. As units of
this University, therefore, The
Daily must strive to be represent-
ative of the University community.
Unfortunately, the Regents of
this University have passed legis-
lation that will continue this mis-
representation. Their ruling al-'
lows for the editors to have com-
plete freedom in, the selection of:
their successors and in determin-
ing editorial policy. In view of the1
fact that The Daily editors have
admitted to our charges of not in-
tending to represent anyone but'
themselves we have not pursued
the investigation of The Daily. But'
instead we have asked for an
elected board of Student Publica-
tions that will sit as publishers
over The Aaily to determine edi-
torial policy and select the senior
editors. We further suggested that
this be an entire student board.
This action is not a reaction to
any one thing The Daily has done
but is consistent with our philoso-
phy of returning Power to the
People. We cannot allow The
Daily to disrupt our campus as
it is trying to do but seek ways to
make it responsible to and repre-
sentative of the University com-
munity."

SWSU asking money
for ADC legal costs
By STEVE KOPPMAN
Social Work Student Union voted yesterday to solic
support in the Social Work school to defray legal costs incu
red by ADC mothers during the welfare protests last Septen
ber at the Washtenaw County Bldg.
Letters will be distributed to all students and facul
members in the school, asking for a contribution to a fu
for that purpose.
SWSU also passed a resolution urging that the Medic
School include in planning a proposed Family Health Ui
students from the schools of medicine, public health and s
cial work, in addition to mem--

-Daily-Peter Dreyfuss
Harris takes a alk
Deinocratic mayoral candidate Prof. Robert Harris talks with an area resident yesterday during
his 'blight walk' dowh North Main Street.
NOT RETROACTIVE:
Regents mayen-md phylsedrl

hers of the Ann Arbor com-
munity.
The resolution, endorsed by
Graduate Assembly last week, was
attributed to the fear that t h e
clinic as envisaged will sacrifice
adequate health service for poor
families in the interests of, teach-
ing and research, and t h a t the
clinic would primarily be oriented
toward middle-class needs.
"The goals of the clinic should
reflect community needs," said
Jack Marcus, SW '70, who spon-
sored the resolution. "Invariably,
poor people get little curative bare,
and no preventive care."
In other action, SWSU Assem-
bly reiterated its support of stu-
dent participation in the recruit-
ment, hiring, and evaluation of
faculty.
The assembly voted to urge the
immediate placing of five students
on the Search Committee, which
recruits faculty and makes recom-
mendations to the Dean on hiring
These issues are currently be-
ing discussed by members of the
SWSU Executive Board with Dean
Fidele F. Fauri.

Hold teach-

oninrini
A teach-in on "Militarism anc
the University" is being held by
Students for a Democratic Societ3
tonight at 7 p.m. in the Unior
Ballroom.
The teach-in is part of an SDS
program against "militarism" or
campus.
A leaflet distribution this week
by SDS said the teach-in would
include "discussion of possible ac.
tion to be taken relative to de-
mands concerning the collabora-
tion of the University 'with the
military."
It specifically lists abolisbments
of ROTC on campus, the 'end of
war research and the end of mili-
tary recruiting as goals.
Martin Nicolaus, a writer for the
Movement and former editor o:
Viet Report, will speak abou
"militarism on campus and how
it grows." Also speaking will bi
Jim Mellen, a regional SDS worker

a

I

I

sults of the referendum."
"Students in the literary col-
lege. have always comprised the
largest number of voters," Koene-
ke said. "The vote on the referen-
dum makes it clear to the LSA
faculty that the overwhelming
majority.of their students favor
abolition of the language require-
ment."
However, Associate Dean Alfred
Sussman of the literary college
said last night he did not think
the results, of the referendum
would have any great ,effect,k
TI'm not sure whether the fac-
ulty regards student opinion as
paramount at this time," Suss-
man explained.
"The critical determinant right
now will be the intrinsic merits of
the language requirement," he
added.t
At the faculty's regular meeting
two weeks ago, a series of straw
votes indicated the faculty sup-,
ported some form of a language
requirement. However, a "substan-
tial majority" were opposed to re-
taining the requirement in its
present form.
In one straw vote, the faculty
favored the .adoption of the pro-
posed Bachelor of General Stu-
dies degree, which would not re-
quire students to fulfill distri-
bution requirements, including
language.

However, candidates are allowed
up to $10 from each organization
giving them their endorsement.
The penalty for violation of
rules is either a fine of not more
than $100 or disqualification.
" x
Chicago
pro.testers
convicted
CHICAGO OP)-Ten persons, in-
cluding ,controversial former Yale
Prof. Staughton Lynd, were found
guilty yesterday of interfering
with police during the Democratic
National Convention.
The decision by a jury of seven
men and five women came at
the end of an 11-day Circuit Court
trial.
The 10 were in a group of 28
persons arrested Aug. 28 on Hal-
sted Street near the International
Amphitheatre, site of the con-
vention, when they refused to dis-
perse on police orders.
The charge, failing to disperse,
is a misdemeanor punishable by
fine of from $5 to $500.

Continued from Page 1)
The Regents last month gave
Dean William Hubbard of the
Medical School the additional role
of director of the Medical Center.
This was in line with the recom-
mendations of the study commit-
tee.
Smith said other recommenda-
tions would probably be referred
back to the board and to Hubbard
because they do not require re-
gental action.
The 'Regents are also expected
to approve the sale of a small lot
on North Campus to Tau Delta
Phi. The fraternity is one of 1 six
which have expressed definite in-
terest in relocating on North Cam-
pus.
Student Relations Committee
last week recommended the Uni-
versity set aside 10 acres of land
on North Campus to accommodate
these fraternities.

In other fraternity matters, the
Regents are expected to authorize,
construction of a small unit to'
house Nu Sigma Nu medical fra-
ternity. The unit would be located
on Geddes at the site of the old
Delta Kappa Epsilon house which
binr d dun lnt f ll

new house on Fuller. The city,
however, has asked to use the pro-
posed site to widen Fuller.
The University would lease the
new unit to Nu Sigma Nu mem-
bers on a per resident basis.
Members of the fraternity will get

urnlea uown iasr ia
The University was to take over priority for places; but norimem-
Nu Sigma Nu's Huron St. house in bers would be allowed to live in
exchange for rental of land and a the house if it were not filled.
ANN ARBOR. WEL LESL EY CLUB
USZED BOO0K SALE'
Friday, March 21, Noon to 9 P.M.
urday, March 22, 9 A.M. to 1 P.M.

UNIVERSITY CHARTER
FLIGHTS TO LONDON
July 8-August 17 ...................-$214
May 7-June 24............ ... $199
May 15-August 20 . .. ... .... $204
June 27-August 25... $229
Phone 665-8489 1-5 P.M.-725 N. Univ.
Sponsored by University of Michigan Graduate Assembly

ASSEMBLY HALL
MICHIGAN UNION BASEMENT

11

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SUMMER EMPLOYMENT-TRAVEL
CLASSIC CRAFTS CORP.
Unique opportunity available as company represent-
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tive bonus. Earn $1600-$2000. All travel expenses
paid. Must be able to start work by 1 May 69! Must
be 20 years of age (preferably older) . Must furnish
references. Company will hire 10 male students.
REGISTER-Mrs. Cooper, Summer Placement Service
Appt.-Mr. Eshleman, March 25, 26
212 SAB

Your Psy cology
professor lives
with 'his mother?

Ravi
Shanka r

. .,.
--

W d

MARCH 26

HILL AUD.

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INTERNATIONAL

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GET PRINTING QUALITY
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WEEK

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UNION-LEAGUE

THE PRODUCER PROUDLY ANNOUNCES
THE CENTRAL COMMITTEE

FOR

Adw g
Do P-H

SH@W '69

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t:",

i
W PetRITERS:
Petition for
cOpy Y'DITOR

>::r<r
}"S?+qfq

ASST. PRODUCER
Linda Levenberg
DIRECTOR
Allan Hergott

w

SET DESIGNER
David Bakken
TECHNICAL DIRECTOR
Bill Fuller
COSTUME DESIGNER
Cathy Millar
COSTUMER

PUBLICITY
Mark Kettler
Wendy Weinberg
PROGRAM
Rostyn Malmaud
Kris Rowan
TICKETS & USHERS

ASST. DIRECTOR
Sally Klarr

U ~ *~j~r ~ R. - .'~ II

i A I If- A J" A I w-k a Ift P. " mpg% lpi

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