100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 20, 1969 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-03-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

kA---L 'IA .'Tne^

_THEMICHIGAN DAILY
. _ r IT

nursay, M'arch ZU, Ii9V

.

theatre

J& S Society's well-stacked deck

605 E. William 769- 1593
BILL HINKLEY
and

By JOHN A
The University's
Sullivan Society to
on Iolanthe last ni
with the help of a
two won the game
may have lost a po
there it didn't m
when the chips were
at the end.
Director' Roger
chose to stylize the
duction, emphasizin
tasy and playing
chances for humor
worked very well
women's chorus it l
chorus looking a b
and out of characte
too often inaudible,
the first act, which
impression that the
together comfortab
swirls and flourish
staging.
Musical director7
kept the tempos do
in. keeping with the
ception. Under his
orchestra held toge
playing with as mu
as the absence of
tra pit in Trueblood
lows. They gave so
support to the ent
About those aces,
Clark Morningstara
the Lord Chancellor
23rd production wi

.LLEN bert and Sullivan group, w a s
Gilbert and a pair of them all by himself-
ok a gamble and as one of his fellow players
light - and observes, "This is what it is
spare ace or to have two capacities." Mr.
. While they Morningstar's subtleties of fac-
int here and ial expression and gesture were
catter much ideally suited to the stylized de-
e contedmuch licacy of the production. , His
counted up penetrating diction and solid
vocalizing, on the other hand,
Wertenberger were precisely what the evening
whole pro- needed more of, and they serv-
ng the fan- ed him well throughout h i s
down the scenes, particularly in that mad-
r. While it dest of all patter songs, "Love
with t h e Unrequited" - or, as it's bet-
eft the men's ter known, "The Nightmare
bit confused Song."
r. They were All of the soloists, in fact,
especially in came through tens or higher,
added to the with the possible exception of
y weren't al- J. Mark Rottschafer, who tend-
le with the ed to be uncomfortably f 1 a t
hes of the most of the evening, in the role
of the Duke of Tolloller. But
Brad Bloom Charles Sutherland as the Duke
wn slightly, of Mountararat, Dave Johnson
overall con- as a gangling Private Willis, and
baton the Joan Susswein in the title role
ether nicely, came through kings and queens
ich restraint respectively. And the show's
an oreles- true queen, Linda Deater (who
Theatre al- led the women's chorus as queen
lid musical of the fairies) finessed herself.
tire evening. into being one of the evening's
,. Geshom aces.
Ge saMichael Reinhart as Strephon
appearing as and Nancy Jaynes Bloom as
r' in this his Phyllis, his lady fair, were
th the Gil- another pair of aces. Mr. Rein-
hart's singing and acting were
independently satisfying; taken
together they were downright
exciting.
That somehow adds up to
five aces, which is theastrong
* * * kind of hand you can deal your-
self only when the deck is neat-
"The French ly shuffled and stacked in the
to the amor- first place. Iolanthe is that kind
spring, the of deck. Full of that special joy
expressive - manufactured by W. S. Gilbert
Le nuarnce and A. S. Sullivan especially for
very nuance future generations of collegiate
Drthe group Savoyards, Tolanthe remains a
te. gr pertinent commentary on gov-
se. ernment, law, social problems,
s Ives' ver- and the politics of dabbling.
0" brought The wild deuce of the eve-
k the sombre ning also deserves a word. John
In was there, Alexander is, for his third show
in dropped in a row, everybody's favorite
y ,aensemble beanbag. He is tossed about
he carefully from purple pillar to lavender
s anda-ed up post (Tom Ault's visually excit-
ded u ing doing as technical director
ted. and set designer)-and he takes
dued finale his falls as beautifully as ever.
s and chimes How many of these shows he
ords did the can survive is open to question:
the high one can only hope his insur-
Rorem piece, ance company doesn't hear
hoir plainly about it. So long as he isn't bat-
and that's tered into a one-eyed. jack, how-
pring prob- ever, his gentle art of self-de-
do with. struction is a pleasant accent in
e some flesh an often subdued yet ultimately
satisfying show.

MAR.'
9:30,

old-time fiddle music
21, 22 FRI., SAT.
10:30, 11:30 $1.00

"PRISONER OF
SHARK ISLAND"
JOHN FORD, &r.
Gloria Stuart, Wo.ner Baxter

MAR. 20, THURS.
MAR. 21, 22
7c dot

8, 10 P.M.
1:00 A.M.
tcairs

)wnst

** . .. .
3020 Washtenaw, Ph. 434-1782j
BetweenYpsilanti & Ann Arbor
FEATURE TIMES
Wed., Sat., Sun.
1:15, 3:50, 6:25, 9:00
Mon., Tues., 'rhurs., Fri.
7:00=9:15
W te DISNFX$

DIAL 5-6290
(haplinesque.
"Robertson displays a
flair for humor,"
-TIME
Letter Perfect.i.
"CHARLY is a sensitive,
intelligent film,"
-CARROLL, NEWS
ACADEMY AWARD
NOMINEE
BEST ACTOR-
CLIFF ROBERTSON
TECHNICOLOR - '
TECHNISCOPE
Science Fiction...
"Robertson gives on
earnest performance.
It's science fiction
without gadgets, a
horror film without
thrills."
---ANBY, TIMES

TECHNICQOLR PANAVISiON'
CIMWARD*-"*"-* 44M

I

I

*I~6 Walt OItny Pr~ucfloftt ~

i

F,

-'music
Even musicians have flesh

By JIM PETERS
It was another one of those
strange nights at Hill Aud.; the
University Chamber Choir start-
ed out its, concert quite badly
and moved slowly towards some
excellent music by the second
half. Yet their final piece,
though not really objectionable
musically, lacked the shine to
give the entire evening's per-
formance a good name.
Conductor T h o m a s Hilbish
chose a-remarkable program. Its
accent was mostly modern and
its spirit was meditative but op-
timistic. But his vocal group
lacked ensemble through most
of the evening, spoiling an eve-
ning of rarely heard works.
The evening's ups and downs
began with Poulenc's "Mass in
G." This short work by the
French m a st e r omits the
"Credo" section and concen-
trates on the=- intensity of the
three shorter lyrics balancing
the long "Gloria." The opening
"Kyrie" is a ,Renaissance mad-
rigal with. modern tonality,
combining the voices in differ-
ing rhythms and harmonies.
The "Sanctus" is antiphonal,
matching 'the basses and altos
against tenors :and sopranos.
But the high incidence ! of
missed entrances and shaky vo-
cal lines deprived the work of

an polish. The Choir's voices
wee just not integrated for the
smooth ton'ality Poulenc de-
mands. I noticed the most trou-
ble with the basses, but the so-
pranos were weak here as well.
Brahm's first group of "Lie-
beslieder Waltzes" improved
things immensely; and I was
confident that this was one of
those evenings when the musi-
cians needed a while to get go-
ing. The fast sections were
bright and alive, tight ensem-
ble here which faltered only in
the quieter interludes between
these bursts of energy. Of the.
three soloists, none were re-
markable; all were troubled with
unsure intonation or, as far as
the tenor, emotionless declama-
tion.
I guess it took something like
world premiere to wake everyone
from his spring doldrums, and
composer Ned Rorem provided
his "Paris Journal." The piece,
in nine sectiorns, is scored for
fourpart chorus and small or-
chestra.
The piece is great. The vocal
lines are full of the delicate
harmonies ofuBenjamin Britten,
brightened with the charm of
Satie. The orchestra with its
huge assemblage of percussion
noisemakers is most often ac-
centual and comments almost
emotionally on the text.

From the wit of"
Telephone" section t
ous recollections of
Chamber Choir wa
and sensitive to eN
of tone. Conducte
sure hand provided
with expert guidan
But, then Charle
sion of "Psalm 9
trouble. The feel for
pleading of the wor
but the Choir aga
back into that fuze
of the first half. T
planned crescendoe
celerandoes of Ives
broken and. disjoin
Only in the sub
with its echoing bell
over broad organ ch
group again attain
standard set by the f
The Chamber C]
had a bad night,
something which sl
ably had much to
Even musicians hav4
and blood.

the emu players series presents,
AN
ITALIAN,
STRAW
HAT
madcap french farce with music
emu's quirk
auditorium
march 26-30 TIX $1.75
FOR RESERVATIONS: 482-3453
(Weekdays 12:45-4:30 P.M.)

c>-

Litter doesn't throw
itself away; litter
doesn't just happen.
People cause it-and
only people can prevent1
it. "People" means you.
Keep America Beautiful.
advertising contributed
for the public good

I

I _ ,

Presents
ORCHESTRA MICHELANGELO
di FIRENZE
in RACKHAM AUDITORIM

{}

'

o

r

4

Saturday, March 29, 8:30 tHillitTe a
The Michigan Men's Glee ClubhIe Tie and Tas

Sunday, March
PROGRAM

23,

8:30

11111.WIUlIIUEIEIinIk

10000

Il

I1

I

I

l

,i

r.

Sin fonia in C major'...................................... ... . Pugnani
Sin fonia Concertante in G major...........b... .......... . ambini
La Musica Notturna delle Strade di MadridB..,..... ....Boccherini
Concertone; in E-flat major . . . .... .. . Sarti
Iicercare a sei "Dall'offerta Musicale".................................Bach
Sinfonia in D major.................................Di tters von Dittersdorf
Sestetto Op. 70 ...r..............Tchaikovsky
TICKETS: $5.00, $4.00, $2.00
UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY, BURTON TOWER, ANN ARBOR
Office Hours: Mon. thru Fri. 9 to 4:30, Sat., 9 to 12 (Telephone 665-3717)
(Also at Auditorium box office 1 1a hours before performance time)

1

I

El'-"

I-

r

MA RCH 21-22
PERSONA
by INGMAR BERGMAN
Bibi Anderson
Liv Ullman
"Hounting, Intense, Beautiful"
-N.Y. Times

I

I

I

Use Daily Classifieds

MARVIN SUROWITA (MAD MARVIN) IS
PROUD TO ANNOUNCE HIS NEW
ASSOCIATION WITH THE ALTERNATIVE
We will attempt to bring the highly critical Ann Arbor audience the finest in Two
Worlds of Cinema: classic comedy and experimental underground.
2Y2 Hours of Film
FRI. & SAT.
7:30 and 10:00 P.M.
NAT. SCI. AUDITORIUM
Only One Dollar

presents
~ tratlbvb
FESTIVAL THEATRE OF CANADA
BEN JOHNSON'S
THE ALCHEMST

I

I

I

THE COMEDY GREATS-Program

1

W.C. FIELDS-"The Pharmacist"

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan