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March 19, 1969 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-03-19

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, March 19, 1969

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, March 19, 1969

Mf GRANFALLOON PRESENTS
DIONYSUS BENEFIT
D c
CONCERT DANCE
With
THE CHARGING RHINOCEROS
OF SOUL
COMMANDER CODY}
And His Lost Planet Airmen
T THE TEAt
LIGHTS BY TRANS-LOVE LASER BY SONOVISION t
DONATION $1 50
SAT., MARCH 22, 9-2 A.M., LEAGUE BALLROOM

Kenney applies art to the rings

By ERIC SIEGEL
It has, long been said that an
artist's work is the key to his
character.
This statement can be applied to
Rich Kenney, the captain of the
Wolverines' gymnastics t e a m,
whose efforts in front of an
amorphous mound of clay or a
blank page on a drafting board are
as graceful, as artistic and as pro-
ductive as are his efforts on the
rings.
Kenney, the sculptor, likes to
work with free art forms-odd
shapes, with carefully defined lines
and sharp edges; squares, fash-
ioned on other squares, imagin-
ative creations in odd dimensions
that conjure up images of an of-
fice building in an interplanetary
city of the 21st century, sym-
metrical circles of red, centered
on a white backdrop.
As an industrial design student,
Kenney exhibits the same free,s
creative approach that character-
izes his sculpture. His current
project is "a completely unique
design" of a vehicle that he en-

Rich Kenney
as replacing the motor-

Kenney has been striving for
perfection in the sport of gym-j
nastics since his freshman year in
high school, where he found out
that there wasn't an overwhelm-
ing demand for 100 pound half-1
backs and switched from the grid-I
iron to the gymnasium.
Kenney has been a consistently'
high performer, both for the Wol-
verines and for his high school
team in Villa Park, Illinois. But
more important than his success;
in the sport is his attitude towards
competition.
"Gymnastics is, for me, a scal-
ed-down version of life," Kenney
remarked thoughtfully.
"IN GYMNASTICS, you have a;
goal, and you always shoot for
that goal. You always strive to
achieve perfection."
Kenney's competition on t h e
rings is a very personal type of
thing for him, for, as he put it,,
"you can measure your own pro-
ficiency against a standard."
Even more important - for
Kenney and for the Wolverines,
r -is that his competition is a
team thing above everything else.
"He (Kenney) thinks total
team," commented C h a r 1 e y
Froeming, who also competes on
the rings. "He tends to try to take
himself out of the spotlight, even
while he really deserves it, a n d
tries to make sure the team as a
whole gets its share of the cre-
dit."
Kenney's own comments bear
up his team attitude. "The great-I

est thing is to be part of a win-
ning team," he said, with unre-
strained enthusiasm. "Everyone
wants to win as a team, not as an
individual, and this collective
thinking is the best thing we've.
got going for us."
KENNEY THINKS this team
attitude will carry' the Wolverines
to victory in the Big Ten's this
weekend." We can win it all,"
through under pressure against
Kenney predicted. "We c a m e
Iowa and the ability to perform
under pressure is the mark of a
championship team."
Kenney's concern with the team
above himself led him to request
the Daily to contact Coach Newt
Loken before running the story on
Kenney, saying that "if Coach
Loken thinks the publicity will be
detrimental to the team this
weekend, I'd rather not see the
story printed."
Upon hearing Kenney's request,
Loken responded, "Nothing you
could print about Rich Kenney
could be detrimental to the team."
VIRGINIA POWER:

*

visions
cycle.

RICH KENNEY, utilizing his artistic ability in the execution of
an Iron Cross, seeks perfection in his performance on the rings.
In addition to striving for personal excellence, Kenney places
team performance ahead of his own.

"I TRY to approach creativity
in the most free and unique way
possible," comments Kenney. "I
try to come up with something
different, rather than just face
lift something."
This free and creative approach
is characteristic of Kenney's at-
titude towards life, as well as his
approach to art.
"I don't want to be hemmed in
or tied down," Kenney philoso-
phized.
"I like to try new things, and
meet new people to broaden my
experience,"continued Kenney.
"Everyone you meet, everything
you do adds to your experience."
There is another dimension to
Kenney's personality that comes
across in his art, his philosophy,
and, perhaps most conspicuously,
in his efforts on the gymnastics
team. That additional dimension
is his concern with perfection.
"I LIKE to try and expose my-
self to a lot of things," Kenney
repeated, "but I still like to strive
to reach perfection in those
things."

Granby High tops in wrestling

of

t
r
Y
f
i
s

Hudson captain
Lou Hudson has been selected
by his teammates to captain
the 1969-1970 Michigan wres-
tling squad.
Hudson, who competed in the
130 pound weight division, won
18 of 21 decisions this year,
climaxing his season by cap-
turing the Big Ten champion-
ship in his division. Hudson,
however, aggravated a chest in-
jury at the Big Ten champion-
ships and may not be able to
compete in the NCAA cham-
pionships.
Hudson will succeed Pete
Cornell, who competed in the
177 pound division, as the 'M'
captain.

1

By JERRY CLARKE
On the same weekend that
Michigan State was winning its
fourth consecutive Big Ten wres-
tling championship, a Virginia
high school wasdominating its
state tournament in that sport in
a fashion never before equaled.
For the Comets of Granby High,
it was the twentieth time in twen-
ty-one years they had won the
state championship, and there is
little indication that the remark-
able string will be broken in the
near future.

when integration problems forced
partial closings of Norfolk schools.
In that year, Granby finished
second.
THE MAN responsible for Gran-
by's success has been called by
Michigan State coach Grady Pen-
inger "the finest high school coach
in the country." William Martin
is a small, quiet man who is the

lchampions Joe Boone and Ellis,
Granby completely dominated the
state tournament. Then, in 1968,
came the closest call the Comets
have had in years. Hurt by grad-
uation and fielding a young team,
they won three individual crowns
but only took the state title by
six points.
At that time, many observers

only coach the school has ever tnacnei,,o
_ r ania, restlnz wa near n

Granby is a school of about two
thousand students located in Nor-
folk, the state's largest city. It
was among the first Virginia
schools to initiate the wrestling
program that has become one of
the country's finest.
SINCE THE first tournament in
1949, only once did another team
score higher. That was in 1958,

SOC
ELECTIONS
nd $4
EV
MARCH 18 and 19

HERMINA SINCLAIR
University of Geneva, Switzerland
"Teaching Children To

had.
During a match, he rarely says
a word, but watches his team
wrestle with intense concentration.
Between periods he will give the
wrestler the benefit of his anal-
ysis, but will never get excited or
raise his voice. His team is ex-
trmely devoted to him, and reflects
this in its performances. When
Granby loses two of the twelve
weight classes in any dual meet, it
is considered a poor performance.
IN THE summer, Martin con-
ducts a wrestling camp called the
"Granby School of Wrestling." He
is assisted in this endeavor by
Gray Simons, his greatest pupil.
During his wrestling career at
Lock Haven, he was three times
an NCAA champion and twice won
the nation's Outstanding Wrestler
award. In both 1960 and 1964, he
competed on the U.S. Olympic
team. Named NAIA coach of the
year in both 1966 and 1967, he
has made his team into a wres-
tling power despite its small en-
rollment.
Those who attend the five-day
camp are taught, among other
things, the "Granby Roll," a move
invented by Martin. DevelopedI
during Martin's early years at
Granby, the roll is frequently used
by Comet wrestlers as an escape
or reversal move.,
State's Mike Ellis used the ma-
neuver three times to score re-
versals in the Big Ten champion-
ship match with Michigan's Lou
Hudson. Very few people who;
know of the "Granby Roll" have
any idea of the story behind thata
name.
In 1967, led by three-time state

9 0 tVJ LSgg A**511
end. When only eight Comets
qualified for this year's tourna-
ment, other schools began believ-
ing that they, at last, had a chance
to win.
NO ONE believed Martin when,
the week before the meet, he stated
that all eight of his qualifiers had
a shot at individual champion-
ships. They started believing when
the tournament entered its final
day. All eight Granby wrestlers
were in the finals, and the team
had already, built up an insur-
mountable lead. When the chance
came for them to show that Mar-
tin had been right, seven of the
eight won their titles.
The team's performance was, in
part, a present to its coach, Mar-
tin celebrated his twentieth anni-
versary by watching two of his
sons become state champions.
Sophomore David Martin brought
home his second trophy, while
brother Billy, a junior, won after
finishing second and or third the
previous two years.
When 138-pound senior and
honor student Shelly Zablow won
his second consecutive title, it
marked the 100th individual cham-
pionship won by a Granby wres-
tier. Now, after the tournament,
the number stands at 102. Five of
this year's titlists will return next
year. Both of Martin's sons will
be back.
Other schools with dreams of
defeating the Comets will prob-
ably have a long wait before those
dreams are fulfilled. Billy Martin
and his Granby team have proved
themselves efficient dream-break-
ers over the last twenty-one years.

Discover:

Some

Implications

Here's oe card
from the establishment
that no student
will ever burn.

of Piaget's Theory"
FRI., MARCH 21, 8 P.M.

PERRY SCHOOL, 633
Ypsilanti

Harriet

1r

INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL
SUPPORTS the following Candidates for President and Vice-President of STUDENT GOV-
ERNMENT COUNCIL feeling their assets are:
" Representative of a wide range of campus viewpoints
" Capable of effecting harmony in SGC
" Competent and experienced in Student-Faculty-Administration relations
" Innovative and receptive to individual student welfare

MI LLER-Rosenbaum

NELSON-Livingston

IT IS IMPERATIVE THAT YOU MARK MORE THAN ONE CHOICE FOR THE OFFICE OF SGC PRESIDENT

r
1

I..

I
i
1

IS THE U OF M
EAST CAMPUS STILL A MYSTERY
TO YOU?
LEARN THE TRUTH ABOUT THIS LITTLE KNOWN, 800 STUDENT CAMPUS ON A SECLUDED ESTATE IN DEARBORN.
LEARN ABOUT UNIQUE PROGRAMS, CLASS SIZE. ATMOSPHERE.
LEARN WHAT ENGINEERING STUDENTS REALLY THINK ABOUT THEIR COOPERATIVE EDUCATION WITH PRE-GRAD

It'll give you a great trip on your spring vacation.

-r 9 T ~ 7A }*. a"f% '"! .'*1_Y l I 1 A -- r

_y__ L3-- _..- n__L_-_ n__ ---

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