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January 12, 1969 - Image 10

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-01-12

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, January 12, 14

VHF MICHIGAN DAILY Sunday, January 12, 1

GOOD ISSUES SCARCE:
Fall '68: Not a good season
for U.S. student movements

LSA faculty to debate
course requirements

. . . ... ..--

ATTENTION SKIERS !

(Continued from Page )
Neff, who headed the SGC peti-

CPS News Analysis
Fall, 1968 was not a good sea-
son for the student movement.
Student militants came out on the
short end of three major campus
conflicts - Berkeley, New York'
University and San Francisco
State.
The regents at Berkeley let:
Black Panther Eldridge Cleaver
give his lecture, but without cre-
dit. A protest sit-in netted 72 su-
spensions. Meanwhile, Cleaver dis-;
appeared beforeI completing the'
lectures when his parole was can-
celled.
NYU similarly fired Martin Lu-
ther King Center director John
Hatchett for allegedly anti-Seme-
tic remarks. A student strike fail-
ed when blacks and whites found
they could not co-operate.
At San Francisco State College,
Chancellor Glen Dumke fired
English professor and Black Pan-
ther George Murray over the pro-
tests of everyone, including cam-
pus president Robert Smith, who
was later forced to resign.
He was replaced by semanticist

S. I. Hayakawa who thinks more
police action is necessary on the
campus. Nothing but conflict has
followed, and now even the teach-
ers have gone out on strike.
It's best to look at these defeats
in historical perspective. For t h e
first time since student activism
livened up around 1960, no of f-
campus issue is clearly in focus.
Southern racism, banning the
bomb, the House Un-American
Activities Committee and the war
were easy activities to organize
against. But with their demise as
issues, attention has turned to
campus: Afro-American studies at
NYU, a special black curriculum
at Berkeley, the right of black
militants to speak at SFS.
But these are much harder to
organize around. Televised Amer-
ican burning of peasant village in
Vietnam or the clubbing of black
marchers in Selma creates instant
militants, but winning academic
credit for 200 Berkeley students
enrolled in Social Analysis 139X
is not nearly as emotional a cause.

tion drive, does not expect any
Columbia has seen more radical meaningful move from the facul-
success than NYU or SFS, and ty, either, at least from tomor-
that is because they have stuck to row's meeting. "They'll probably

,I

off-campus issues such as IDA,
slum removal and to some extent
the gym.
Increasingly the campus boun-
dary has become the dividing line
between success and failure.
The universities have become
increasingly concerned as the stu-
dents turn away from nice off-
campus issues to attack the roots
of "racism and militarism" in the
schools themselves. They are at-
tacking the very foundation of
the educational establishment.
Administrations justify head-
crackings and suspensions on the
need for keeping the schools open
to help heal a sick society. The
students counter that the univer-
sity itself is a leper that must cure
itself first.
But the universities have power

just make some token move like

making it easier for students to
drop language courses," he said.
SGC plans a meeting tonight
to discuss strategy.
"We're probably going to en-
courage students not to pre-re-
gister for language courses n e x t
term." Neff said.
However, even if the faculty
does pass a motion tomorrow mak-
ing it easier for students to drop
language courses, 'that will be
much more than most professors
are expecting.
"The faculty on the whole felt
they didn't want to be railroaded
on an ill-considereddecision,"
Piranian said. "The faculty may'
not give in to SGC's complaints,
but it would be wrong not to dis-
cuss them."
Prof. James O'Neill, chairman
of the Romance languages depart-I
ment is prepared to speak in fav-
or the the language requirement.
"There is no order or strategy
to the meeting," he said, "It will
denend on what the dean and the

faculty decide to talk about first
and for how long."
O'Neill referred to the b a s i c
controversy as "the designed cur-
riculum versus the intellectual
cafeteria."
"I'm almost certain there will
be changes made within the next
few months," he said, "but I
don't anticipate any revolutionary
reordering of the control of cur-
riculum as a result of this meet-
ing."
Asked about the possibility of
abolishing the language require-
ment, O'Neill said, "That would
be a very unwise thing to do."
To gain support in its campaign
against required courses, Radical
Caucus plans a series of speaking
engagements across campus next
week.
----------- --

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on their side. Meaningful campus
reform will become tougher.
[I

W _~

_-

Regents to reconsider
dorm residency rules

(Continued from Page 1) 1
h o u s i n g market and the re-:
sulting high rental costs.
For that reason, at least oner
student on the advisory board to
the housing office favors keepingt
the requirement for freshmen.
However, the main obstacle to-
ward complete freedom is t h e
Board of Governor's decision last1
September supporting the contin-
uation of the residency require-t
ment for freshmen.
The board was unanimous in its
support for voluntary occupancy
for sophomore 'women.
On the other hand, both the
Student Advisory Committee on
Housing and the student group
advisory to Acting Vice President
COME TOt
Student Book Servicet
and visit
RENEE
BARB
KUND.US

for Student Affairs Barbara New-
ell have strongly supported elim-
ination of the residency require-
ment.
The Regents will be inundated
with a wide variety of opinion.
The general consensus is that the
effectiveness of student and fac-
ulty arguments at Thursday's
hearing will be the deciding fac-
tor.

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