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March 14, 1969 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-03-14

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, March 14, 1969

Page Sb THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Fricloy. March 14. 1969

:..

FACULTY SPEECH:

I

SG;Cannroves prie nrot~st.

-----r"-- ' """

Cohen makes debut jois suit against State Senate

FOOD STRIKE
Students protest meals

cueIore ea, scnoQ~t

By NADINE COHODAS
"I'm a 'Very pragmatic man,"
said Wilbur Cohen newDean of
the School of Education.
Speaking to the school's faculty
and students yesterday for the
first time officially, Cohen s a i d
he likes "to see things work and
it distresses me when they don't."
Throughout his brief, predict-
able speech, Cohen emphasized his
willingness 'to have the "partici-
pation and involvement of every-
one concerned" in the education
school.
"No one needs to feel intimidat-
ed," Cohen added. He said he ex-
pects people "to tell me when
my ideas are bad and also to tell
me how they may be improved."
Cohen said he doesn't "hold a
grudge about anything anyone
says to me." He said he expects
"students and faculty to treat me,
the way I treated Presidents of
the United States." Cohen, who
was Secretary of Health, Educa-
tidn and Welfare tinder Lyndon
Johnson, and has served in other
administrations, said he always
gave presidents his frank opin-
ions of their respective programs.
Cohen strongly emphasized the

need for teachers to be involved in
public service.
"There is no greater contribu-
tion for a teacher than to be of
help to his community, state, and
nation," Cohen said. "Teaching
can be the most noble profession,"
ae said, and then added "to be a
teacher is to somehow influence
eternity."
"The University cannot avoid
being involved in social prob-
lems," Cohen said. He believes ed-
ucation can play a big part in al-
leviating the problems of t h e
inner city ghettoes especially.
"We'll do our best to focus on
these problems," Cohen added.
He suggested there should be an
"open dialogue" between students
and administrators but said he
would have to "think about" whe-
ther or not there should be a per-
manent channel through which
students can exercise their power.
Regardless of the eventual de-
cisions, Cohen promised "to make
this an institution we can all be
proud of."
After the speech; a coffee hour
was held. Chocolate chip cookies
and butterscptch bars were served.
A good time was had by all.

(Continued from Page 1)
and manager of the store, before
the protests begins. The delegation,
composed of two SGC members, j
one representative of Panhel, and
one member of IFC, will cite the;
student's demands, and offer to t
discuss the issue with Stephan.
SGC member Larry Deitch sug-
gested last night that approval of(
the protest should be delayed un-I
Senate ps.Q
on non-pro.

(Continued from Page 1)
visers on whether to go head
with ABM, and will discus the
subject at a news conference to
be broadcast nationally today at
noon.
The White House provided no
infor'mation about what went on,
between Nixon and Defense Sec-
retary Melvin Laird.
It is known that Laird h a s fav-
ored deployment of the Sentinel
ABM system, modified to the ex-
tent of moving antimissile batter-
ies away from cities, thus blunting

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til after the meeting with Stephan. Joining SGC as plaintiffs in the
"If we don't lay our groundwork, lawsuit against the Senate In-
we're goiig to fall flat on our vestigation Committee are Grad-
face," Deitch explained. "How- uate Assembly. Ann Arbor SDS
ever, if negotiations fail to produce and several members of the Radi-
any concessions, then we should cal Education Project.
take militant action." However, The lawsuit will ask a federal
most SGC members felt the im- court to rule that the senate in-
pending protest would provide the vestigation violates the First and
four representatives with increased Fourteenth Amendments to the
bargaining power. Constitution.-
"The very existence of the com-
iittee, as well as several actions,
ep a tit has taken, has created an at-
mosphere of intimidation against
e individuals engaged in political
activity, and other aspects of free,
1 er t on Ispeech," says Marc Stickgold, a
Detroit Lawyer who has been han-
dling the preparations of the pro-
some opposition while still offer- posed lawsuit.
ing a defense against a possible The tentative suit is backed by
Red Chinese missile attack in the two recent precedents, Stickgold
1970s, says. In fall, 1966, a federal courtl
The modified concept would be kept the Tennessee legislature l
calculatedto allay the fears of from carrying out a similar in-
some critics that the presence of .vestigation. And in last summer,
Sentinel sites. would make their court action prevented the Wis-
cities prime targets for enemy consin legislature from probing
assaults, and also would pose a activism at the University of Wis-
threat of accidental explosions. consin.
Returning from a week-long According to several SGC of-]
Vietnam inspection trip, Laird in- ficers, taking the "offensive" rath-
dicated Wednesday night he ex- er than waiting for, the committee
pects a go-ahead on some form to issue subpoenas will put the
of Sentinel deployment, plaintiffs in a better position to1
Key defense officials who have halt the investigation.
been close to the Pentagon's Koeneke said the lawyers were
month-long review of the Sen- giving the plaintiffs "a 50-50#
tinel said they would bet that the chance" of winning the suit. 1
President would approve a re- However, Koeneke said he be-
sumption of work on the project. lieved the lawsuit would enhance1
Fulbright said however the Sen- the University's position "by show-
ate ratification of the treaty giv- ing we are willing to work within
es Nixon a base for a decision the framework of the law in chal-
against deployment. lenging the senate committee."

By ERIKA HOFF
The residents of Alice Lloyd Hall staged a
food strike at dinner last night to protest the
quality of the food they were being served: About
90 per cent of the students participated by going
through the meal line and taking only beverage
and dessert.
Some people, however, did eat the dinner yes-
terday. The.Board of Governors of 'Residence Halls
dined at Alice Lloyd last night.
The adult members of the Board of Governors
ate the meal, but the student members participat-
ed in the strike.
The strike is not the first action the students
have taken in an attempt to get improvements
in the quality of the dormitory's meals.
The dormitory grievance committee has voiced
students' complaints throughout the year. A peti-'
tion requesting an improvement in the quality
of the food was circulated in the dorm and pre-
sented to the dieticians. Dorm residents also com-
pleted cafeteria evaluation sheets-all with no
visible results.
Four Alice Lloyd residents decided that a food

strike was the next logical step. Gail Ruskin. '72,
said that the action was prompted by a number of
recent incidents.
Miss Ruskin says that when she went through
the line at lunch Wednesday, the only meat of-
fered was ham. She asked if there was another
choice and was told that there wasn't.
"Miss Sheperd (the dietician) asked me if I
was Jewish and told me that they didn't allow
for religious preferences," says Miss Ruskin. "She
also told me, 'If you don't like the food here, you
can move out'"
The list of students' grievances includes the
following:
- More popular dishes are often gone before
the line closes. Wednesday night the only dish of-
fered during the 'last fifteen minutes of dinner
was liver and onions.
- Very often there is no choice at lunch.
When bacon, lettuce, and tomato sandwiches are
being served, many Jewish students eat no meat
at all.
- The same food is sometimes served as des-
sert and salad.

Blacks challenge Flint policies

(Continued from Page 1)

"

0

05 e ,7"en, . 1 r6 '

TO /a rflevss (K;

lem of housing the out-of-town
black students they hope to re-
cruit this spring.
At present, virtually the only
housing available in the campus
area Is in two apartment buildings
which, under an agreement with
the college, lease all 99 spaces to
Flint students.
Administrators also cite t h e
heavy black enrollmentsatanearby
Flint Junior College as a drain
on the number of blacks who can
attend Flint. t
"The junior college has been es-
tablished in the city for a long,
long time," Roberson notes. "Black
students have traditionally gone to
the junior college."
But to SBA members, the jun-
ior college's black, student enroll-
ment of over 500 is in glaring
contrast to the handful who at-
tend Flint College.
"I don't think the admissions
office actively recruits black stu-

i'
.
3

dents. Farmer asserts.
And in addition to their c o n-
cern for the academic status of
blacks in Flint, SBA members are
extremely suspicious of hiring
procedures for the non-academic
staff.
They are especially interested in
the relatively small percentage of
blacks hired by the Flint Board of
Education as janitors and .kitchen
workers.
"We will be investigating t h e
Flint Board of Education to make
sure it is an equal opportunity
employer," says Thompson.
SBA members also report some
difficulties with white students--
especially with the college's al-
legedly "racist" Student G o v-
ernment.
When SBA first soughtto have
its constitution approved by the
Student Government last month,
members were told -they would
have to wait about four weeks.
"But when we put a little pres-

sure on them," he adds, "they rat-
ified it in 10 minutes,"
However, Student Government
President James Stickle, explains
thatj under the standard proced-
ure for ratifying constitutions, the
action would usually have taken at
least two weeks. Any legislation
must normally go through three
readings, he says.
Stickle claims Student Govern-
ment members never saw the pro-
posed constitution until the day
it was given final approval. "Then
we suspended the rules so we could
take care of them," he says.
"No one's giving them anything
but help up here," Stickle says.
"There've been no problems at
all."
, But SBA members insist all is
not well at Flint Coliege. T h e
question has become what action
the students will take to press
their demands.

,- _..

cNc 7-A-4-T Mcv be-

LDP ;TereJ7T

RONAI
"Violence and Non-
in the Struggl
Social JUSti(

Violence
e for
Ce

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CA' 4AlICS,)

fY/s.CArSd4A ,-7<'s
ate5"i41L 1T.
We'd ike to'thank Mrs. Brooks for allowing us to re-print her exceptional story in its entirety @ Vorkswagen of America, Inc.
Howard Cooper Volkswagen
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2575 So. State St., Ann Arbor i Phone 761-3200 AITHOr1ZE
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SHUTTLE BUS SERVICE

An active member of The Resistance, Ron is currently
under indictment for refusing to cooperate with the Selec-
tive Service System.
Ron has worked with SCLC, attended a conference in
Uruguay on "Non-violence ,and Latin American Revolu-
tions" and was one of 40 Americans to meet with repre-
sentatives of the NLF and of North Vietnam in Czecho-
slovakia in 1968.
Dedicated to non-violent action to solve social problems,
Ron is currently working with the Fellowship of Recon-
ciliation.
SUNDAY, MARCH 16-7 P.M.
First Methodist Church
Ron's apperance is part of the "To Pursue Peace" lecture-
discussion series sponsored by:
INTERFAITHCOUNCIL F9R PEACE AND
ECUMENICAL CAMPUS CENTER
(Individual lecture: students .50)

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
SCHOOL OF MUSIC AND DEPARTMENT OF ART
Are Pleased To Announce
THE SECRET MAIRRIAGE
(an opera by Cimarosa, sung in English)
MARCH 20, 21, 22-8:00 P.M.
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
ALL TICKETS $3.00
Mail orders accepted. Make checks payable to "The University of Michigan." Send self-
addressed, stamped envelope to School of Music Opera, Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104. Box Office opens Monday, March 17, 12:30-5:00 P.M.
GOOD SEATS STILL AVAILABLE
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FOUR LEAGUES OPEN-CALL AT ONCE

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ATTENTION FRATS AND SORORITIES!
Plan a spring picnic with golf, hall and hayride
"I would like to see interfraternity golf competition.
This is a good course to warm up on."
CALL DON FOR ARRANGEMENTS
Special rates to students
. H U 3-5010
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G

AN S JOPLIN! h-huh
and
JAMES COTTON too? right!
SAT., MARCH 15---i.e. TOMORROW
Events Bda--8:30 PJM.

..

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