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March 12, 1969 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1969-03-12

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, March 12, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, March 12, 1969

Allen's success

stuns

all

By CINDY LEATHERMAN
As a senior at Palo Alto (Cali-
fornia) High School, Mike Allen
surprised quite a few people by
capturing the eCntral Coast Sec-
tion championship in the 200-yard
freestyle with a time of 1:45.
His best time previously had been
1:49.
As a sophomore at the Univer-
sity of Michigan, Allen did it
again. Only this time, it was in
the 200-yard butterfly for the
Big Ten championship March 1st.
Before this meet, his best time of
the season had been 1:58.9-Al-
len won the event with a 1:53.49.
He not only surprised the spec-
tators in Bloomington, but his
teammates (particularly Lee Bis-
bee and Tom Arusoo, Michigan's
powerful butterfly duet who fin-
ished second and third), his coach
(Gus Stager, who felt he might
be able to capture third at best),
and especially himself.
"It was a surprise," Allen com-
4mented, smiling. "I never swam
butterfly in practice - the last
time I did was my freshman year."
Coach Stager was pleasantly as-
tounded with the 6'4" sophomore.
"We had no idea at all that Mike

would win. I didn't think he was
good enough to beat our two but-
terfliers (Bisbee and Arusoo).
"But he swam a tremendous race,"
Stager continued. "I'm very pleas-
ed with Mike's performance."
There are a lot of factors in-
volved in such an improvement-
a drop of five seconds is quite
significant in swimming times.
The fact that Allen was shaved
down (hair removed from t h e
arms and legs to reduce friction
in the water) can lower a time
as much as one second.
Allen also observed that "every-
one else drops in time too. That's
the way you plan it-to take a big
drop at the big meets: You're justI
too tired during the regular sea-
son."
Certainly practice and atti-
tude have a lot to do with an
athlete's improvement. Allen
swims at least two-and-a-half to
three hours every day. "When the
stroke feels good," he said, "it's
worth it.
"Trouble is, it takes so damn
long. I didn't work out at all last
summer, and I haven't felt good
all season - until the Big Tens."
(Allen spent last summer at Stan-
ford doing research on a collection

of primitive art from Australia. er. "He's a good person and a
Owned by his father, the collec- good coach. He has a personality
tion is now on exhibit at the I get along with."
Berkeley museum.) Last year, though, Allen was
As far as attitude is concerned, feeling doubtful about his sport.
Allen believes "You have to be "I was really turning things over
up for a race to swim well - in my mind-having all sorts of
and you have to be up in practice doubts and decisions and the feel-
to get in shape for a race." ing I could be spending my time
Allen has been "up" for swim- doing better things. But when
ming ever since he first started you're in it (swimming) there's
taking lessons at age eleven. "The meaning, and once you've made
person who influenced me most as the initial conimitment. y o u
far as swimming is concerned, was should stick with it."-
the coach I had from the time I But success is a bolstering fac-
started until I was fifteen - Gus tor, and this year, Allen is sure
Dea had a successful high he's where he wants to be. "I en-
Alln hd asucessul ighjoy swimming," he commented.
school career, performing well at And Coach Stager pointedly ob-
the A.A.U.'s and sectional meets. servedC "Anybody enjoys it when
He was accepted at Stanford, they're succesful."
Yale, and Michigan, and finally
chose the latter because "Stanford There's only one more big swim-
was too close to home and I didn't mirig event this year, and Allen
want to have to wear a coat and hopes to duplicate his performance
tie all the time at Yale." at Bloomington. Inconsistency is
..His freshman year on the squad the biggest problem he must con-
was uneventful. "He'd have flash- tend with in preparing for the
es of potential along the way, and NCAA's. "Inconsistent isn't really
then bad lapses," explained Stag- the right word," Stager comment-
er. "He had a little trouble ad- ed. "It's just that until the latter
justing at first, but he gets along part of the season, he hasn't shown
fine now." the true potential he exhibited in
Allen gets along well with Stagl high school."

w

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TIGER THIRD BASEMAN Don Wert starts the spring season
with the same hustle that he gave the World Champion Tigers
all last season. Here Wert tries to break up a Pirate double play
en route to Detroit's come-from-behind 5-4 victory over Pittsburgh
yesterday.
Tiers edge Pirates;
Yanks stretch streak

FOUR TEAMS CUT:

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I

Boston
By PHIL HERTZ
One year ago the National In-
vitation, Tournament decided to
increase its field from fourteen to'
sixteen teams because of the abun-
dance of top-flight teams across
the nation. In this year of fewer
top-flight collegiate fives, the NIT
decided to cut four teams from
its field in an attempt to stage
nothing less than a first rate tour-
nament.
Unfortunately for the tourna-
ment directors, their attempt
seems to have fallen short of the
goal as this year's field will further
illustrate the decline of the NIT
which has been continuous since
the early fifties. Then it was open
to all NCAA entrants and at-
tracted iall the top cage quintets
in the country. Now it is limited to
conference runners-up, rejects
from the NCAA tourney, and the
stronger teams from the New York
Metropolitan area.
The 1969 NIT includes seven
second place finishers, Temple
(18-8) from the Middle Atlantic
Conference, Tennessee (18-6) from
the Southeastern Conference, Wy-
oming (19-8) from the Western
Athletic Conference, Ohio (16-8)
from the Mid-American Confer-
ence, Kansas (20-6) from the Big
Eight, Louisville (20-5) from the
Missouri Valley Conference, and
South Carolina (20-6) from the
Atlantic Coast Conference.

College heads

NIT

There are also four New York
area teams, Rutgers (20-3), Ford-
ham (17-8), St. Peter's (20-6),
and Army (16-8). None of the
teams, however, played a really
strong schedule,
Three NIT participants, West
Texas State (17-7), Southern Il-
linois (16-7), and Boston College
(21-3) were independent powers
rejected by the NCAA tournament,
and two other entrants, Tulsa (19-
7) from the Missouri Valley Con-
ference and Florida (18-8) from
the Southeastern Conference, were
only able to finish third in their
resective leagues.
Only four of the quintets in the
tourney received mention in the
final Associated Press Poll. South
Carolina was rated thirteenth,
Louisville fifteenth, Boston Col-
lege sixteenth, and Kansas nine-
teenth. kansas, Louisville, and
South Carolina all have suffered
defeats since the poll was publish-
ed, and Kansas has been downhill
since February when the Jay-
hawkers' top ballplayer, Jo-Jo
White graduated. -
Pre-season decisions by the
NCAA, which barred La Salle and
St. Bonaventure, two top Eastern
powers, from post-season tourna-
ments because of rule violations
further weakened the potential, at
least indirectly, for a strong NIT
field.

As things stand now, only Bos-
ton College, which defeated NCAA
bound Duquesne by 20 points last
week, has the talent to dominate
the 1969 NIT; however, even Bos-
ton College will have to be wary
of the cinderella teams, that have
become to prevalent in recent
tourneys.
Two teams that made surprising
showings in the two most recent
tournaments are entered in this
year's NIT; Southern Illinois
which stunned Eastern basketball
writers by capturing the tourna-
ment crown last season when it
competed as a smallcollege team;
and St. Peters, co-champion of the
Metropolitan Conference.
That year the Salukis were led
by Walt Frazier, who went on to
stardom with the .New York
Knicks, and a sophomore named
Dick Garrett, who has achieved
all-american status this year. Gar-
rett, a 6'3" forward, who has oc-
casionally played guard, has aver-
aged 20 points a game for each of
his three seasons. He leads a bal-
anced team which' features four
I starters who average in double
figures. Coach Jack Hartman's
squad has also been aided by a
strong defense that has yielded
only 63 points a game, good
enough to place the Salukis thir-
teenth in the nation in that cate-
gory.
Over the regular season, South-

ern Illinois was inconsistent, but
the Salukis did finish the cam-
paign by winning four of their
last five contests. The Salukis may
be gaining the consistancy they
lacked all year, if so, the so-called
power teams of the NIT will have
to contend with them.
St. Peter's, also must be counted
as a threat. -Last year the Pea-
cocks stunned the sport world
when they trounced a strong Duke
squad, 100-79, and then went on
to capture fourth place in the
NIT. Then St. Peter's featured a
strong, fast ball club, which, was
one of the top offensive teams in
the country; however, St. Peter's
lost four of its five starters, and
Peacock Coach Don Kennedy was.
forced to build his team around,
the one returnee, Elnardo Webster.
Webster, however, was no or-
dinary ballplayer. As Kennedy
says, "Webster is a tremendous
player. St.Peter's has}never had
a ballplayer like him before." Last
year Webster averaged 25 points
and 13 rebounds a game. He also
set an NIT scoring mark of 51
points when St. Peter's defeated
Marshall. This year the big "El"
has been averaging 23 points and
15 rebounds.
The tourney opens Thursday
night at Madison Square Garden.
The opening round pairings are:
Thursday:
St. Peter's of N.J. (20-6) vs. Tulsa

field

,00-.9p" .

CAMPUS
INTERVIEW
One of the highest paying of.
all summer jobs
Many-students working full
summer averaged above $125
weekly. One out of three made
$133 or more weekly. One out
of four made $139 or more
weekly.
How to qualify for interview
(1) Minimum age 18. (2) Need
va'id driver's license and be
able to drive clutch transmis.

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ARCH 27
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See your Summer Placement
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now.

By The Associated Press
The Detroit Tigers, who w o n
over 40 games last y e a r in the
seventh inning or later, did the
trick again yesterday in their 5-4
exhibition baseball victory over
Pittsburgh.
With the score tied 4-4, Dick
McAuliffe led off the ninth in-
ning with a double off reliefer
Dick Hendrix, t h e n came home
on Mickey Stanley's single.
The Tigers were behind twice
earlier. In the eighth, Detroit was
losing 4-3 when Ron Woods hom-
ered to tie the game.
Clete Boyer started a three-run
rally in the eighth inning with a
solo home run yesterday) that
swept the Atlanta Braves to a 5-3
exhibition baseball victory o v e r
the Houston Astros.
Mike Lum drove in two more
runs with a double, with all three
runs charged to losing pitcher
'Steve Shea.
Houston took a 2-0 lead in the
fourth inning on a triple by Doug
Rader, a double by Curt Blefary
a n d a single by John Edwards.
Denis Menke slammed a solo hom-
er in the ninth for the Astros' oth-
er run.
Johnny Bench slammed a triple,
double and single yesterday to
drive in three runs and lead Cin-
cinnati to a 6-1 exhibition base-
ball victory over the Kansas City
Royals.
Gary Nolan, Tony Cloninger and
Clay Carroll each pitched three
innings and held t h e Royals to
four hits to break a three-game
Kansas City winning streak.
The Royals scored their only run
in the first inning off Nolan on
a double by Mike Fiore and a sin-
gle by Steve Whitaker.
Rookie outfielder Bill Russell
sparked a three-run sixth inning
Tuesday as the Los Angeles Dodg-
ers edged the Montreal Expos, 4-1,
in an exhibition baseball game.
Outfielder M a c k Jones hit a
375-foot home run to right field
for Montreal's only score in the
fourth inning.
The Cleveland Indians took ad-
vantage of five bases on balls to
record a 5-3 exhibition baseball
victory over the San Diego Pad-
res yesterday.
rand slam home run by Ted
Uhlaender in the second inning

carried the Minnesota Twins to a
7-6 victory over the Boston Red
Sax in an exhibition baseball game
yesterday.
The St. Louis Cardinals batter
around in two consecutive innings
yesterday to overpower the Phila-
delphia Phillies 8-1 in an exhibi-
tion baseball game.
A home run by Larry Hisle was
the only Phillies' run against
three Cards pitchers.
Hisle connected off starter Gary
Waslewski in the second inning.
The Cards promptly retaliated
with a four-run outburst against
Barry Lersch, scored three more
against Bill Laxton in the fourth
inning and added a final run in
the ninth off Bill Wolfe.
American League Oakland A's
crushed the National League San
Francisco Giants 11-5 yesterday
in the first meeting between the
Bay Area rivals in a spring train-
ing exhibition show.
Rookie Tom Shopay's two-out
two-run single in the seventh
broke a 3-3 tie and led the un-
beaten New York Yankees to a
5-3 victory over the Chicago
White Sox in an exhibition base-
ball game yesterday.
The Yanks loaded the bases with
two out in the seventh off star re-
liever Wilbur Wood and Bob Prid-
dy. Bobby Mitchell's double and
walks to Gary Washington a n d
Gene Michael set it up for Shop-
ay's winning hit against Priddy.
The Baltimore Orioles received
14 bases on balls. yesterday b u t
needed tight pitching from Jim
Palmer and three others to hand
the Washington Senators thpir
fifth straight exhibition def at
2-1.
Manager Ted Williams' team
scored its first run in 1b innings
when Tim Cullen's single in the
eighth scored Mike Epstein, who..
led off with a double.
Tony Cohigliaro got his f i r s t
hit of the spring for the Red Sox.
He doubled off the fence in left
center against a strong wind to
drive in a run,
Cleon Jones' three-run homer
climaxed an eight-run sixth in-
ning Tuesday that carried the New
York Mets to their first exhibi-
tion baseball victory of the year,
15-7 over the Philadelphia 'B'
team.

I

*1

AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER (M/n"

4

SUNDAY-MARCH 23, 1969 - 8:00 P.M. - FORD AUDITORIUM

TENANTS, TAX,.CREDIT
Michigan law entitles tenants to claim 20% of their rent as
credit against state income tax. If you do not claim this credit,
your landlord may subtract 'this 20% of your rent from his tax
bill, but by law he is not entitled to that credit. Do not pay your
landlord's income tax as well as his property tax, have your land-
lord fill out a form, MI 1040G. If he refuses he is breaking the
law, furthermore such information provides the State with figures
to check tax returns of Ann Arbor landlords. For information
contact:
TENANTS UNION OFFICE
1532 S.A.B.
763-3102

I

I

CLANCY BROTHERS
AND'
TOMMY MAKEM
"Minstrels of the Emerald Isle"
TICKETS: $5.50-4.50-3.50-2.50. Available at: Ford Auditorium,
Grinnell's, all J. L. Hudson stores, Wayne State University, Univer-
sity of Detroit. Mail orders should include self-addressed, stamped.
envelope. Student discount $1.00 at each price level on tickets
purchased at Wayne State University or University of Detroit.

(19-7), and Florida
Temple (18-8).
Friday :
Ohio (16-8) vs. West'
(17-7), and Rutgers
Tennessee (18-6).

(18-8) vs.
Texas State
(20-3) vs.

Saturday:
Army (16-8) vs. Wyoming (19-8),
and South Carolina (20-6) vs.
Southern Illinois (1.6-7).
Sunday:;
Kansas (20-6) vs. Boston College
(21-3), and Fordham (17-8) vs.
Louisville (20-5).

A SYMPOSIUM ON

THE QUESTION OF
LEGALIZED ABORTION
PARTICIPANTS:
SENATOR JOHN McCAULEY, now leading the fight in the
Michigan Senate for legalized abortion
FATHER MICHAEL DONOVAN, author of
"Sexuality and Moral Responsibility"
DR. ROBERT JAFFE, U-M gynecologist and obstetrician
RABBI MAX KAPUSTIN, Hillel director at
Wayne State University
THURSDAYMARCH 13-8 P.M.

SPOIL YOURSELF'

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ART
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