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March 12, 1969 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1969-03-12

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Wednesday, March 12, 1969 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page ThreA

Professional Theatre Program
Presents
by the Authors of "FIDDLER ON THE ROOF !"

CAMPUS CONSPIRACIES?
Crackdown on

protests spreads

,f

~WILL

TO
GUJGE

ROSGVA
?RINZ

By PHIL SEMAS
College Press Service
SAN FRANCISCO-For years
Students for a Democratic So-
ciety and other groups in the
Left have been worrying and
talking about "repression" on
the campuses. Most students
thought they were beingro-
mantic or paranoid or both.
But now the worry is a reality:
the crackdown has begun.
Governors and state legisla-
tors are moving quickly to crack
down on the unrest that is
sweeping American campuses.
Legislatures and governors in
Wisconsin. California, Colorado,
Iowa, Michigan, Kansas, New
York and other states are all
working on legislation which in-
creases penalties for disrupters,
cuts off their financial aid, and
keeps them off the campuses.
More than 5 such bills have
been introduced in the Cali-
DIAL 5-6290

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THE ALCHEMIST

fornia legislature, and 17 in
Wisconsin.
Even President Nixon has en-
couraged talk about campus
conspiracies, saying in letters
from Europe that he is "very
concerned" about the rash of
uprisings on campuses across
the country in past weeks s
Two Republican governors,
Warren Knowles of Wisconsin
and Ronald Reagan of Californ-
ia, have also been- using their
executive authority extensively,
B o t h called out the National
Guard in recent weeks, and Rea-
gan has announced that from
n o w on extensive police force
will be used at the start of dis-
ruptions, rather t h a n waiting
until the violence reaches a high
level.
Campus administrators, w h o
must live with strict new regu-
lations and who are usually a
little m o r e liberalrthan state
legislators, have been moving a
little slower. But they are mov-
ing: recently the president of
Notre Dame - hardly a hotbed
of unrest ,-announced t h a t
demonstrators would be dealt
with harshly.
The crackdown is probably
heaviest in California, which
has h a d more campus unrest
than any other state.
S. I. Hayakawa, acting presi-
dent of San Francisco State Col-
lege, practically invented the
crackdown. He recently told a
Congressional subcommittee, "I
believe I have introduced some-
thing new to this business of
preserving order on campuses,"
referring to his use of police
early rather t h a n waiting as
long as possible "the way some
other administrators have
dome."
At the University of Californ-

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ia's Berkeley campus, the ad-
ministration also took a hard
line on the student strike which
began Jan. 22. Police have been
on the campus almost from the
beginning of the strike, although
Chancellor Roger Heyns has
tried to keep a tighter reign on
them than have administrators
< at San Francisco State, where
the police were turned loose on
several days to beat demonstra-
tors almost at will.
Administrators w h o don't
move fast enough orcrack down
hard ,enough m a y find them-
Iselves in for some heavy crit-
icisli from the politicians. San
Francisco State President Rob-
ert Smith, who actually tried to
talk about the issues in his cam-
pus' strike also t r i e d to cut
down on the escalating cycle of
student - police confrontations,
was one casualty of such crit-
icism.
Although Roger Heyns* is by
no means soft on campus pro-
testers, he has come under hea-
vy fire for trying to control the
police and insisting on due pro-
cess in disciplinary cases f o r
those cited in the disruptions.
Sheriff Frank Madigan of Ala-
meda County, where the Berk-
eley campus is located, criticiz-
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students of the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michi-
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ed Heyns for not summarily
dismissing student strikers.
When the Regents m e t 'in
Berkeley recently, Reagan and
several other Regents attacked
Heyns. Reagan demanded a ban
on all rallies and removal of all
strikers from the campus. He
implied that Heyns was being
soft "because of the cause these
dissidents are advocating" and
that there "would be no ques-
tion if it were the Ku Klux Klan
trying to bring the Grand Dra-
gon on campus."
Thus, a good deal of control
over the situation has been tak-
en away from Heyns. The po-
lice, under Sheriff Madigan,
have been breaking up picket
lines and attacking crowds, beat-
ing students indiscriminately.
Heyns is under orders from the
Regents to immediately suspend
any student involved in disrup-
tions and not to approve any
rallies or meetings which might
be used to organize disruptions.
The crackdown means more
than police beating demonstra-
tors. Both Berkeley a n d San
Francisco State seem a little like
dictatorships today. The right to
assemble on S an Francisco
State'scentral campus has been
denied since Jan. 6, and Haya-
kawa recently tried to stop the
critical student press by cutting
off funds for the college's stu-
dent newspapers. At Berkeley
'there has been no general ban
on gatherings, but the adminis-
tration has been rejecting appli-
cations for outdoor and indpor
rallies alike.
Tear gas, long lines of police,
and helicopters whirling over-
head are part of everyday life
on both campuses, making them
-resemble battlefields. One state
legislator 'has proposed what
may be the ultimate solution:
walling in the campuses a n d
forcing students to check in be-
fore going to class.

the
Snews today
by The Associa/ed Press and College Press Service
PRESIDENT NIXON will announce his decision on
whether to proceed with the Sentinel system later this
week.
Nixon's press secretary, Ronald L. Ziegler, said yesterday
the announcement will come after the President confers with
Secretary of Defense Melvin Laird, due to return from his
Vietnam trip late tonight.
Meanwhile, opponents of Sentinel increased their efforts
to influence Nixon's decision. Sen. Edward Kennedy (D-
Mass.), a leading critic of the system, told the Senate, "Each
increase in arms generates an increase in tension and each
increase in tension leads us closer to hostilities."
Three scientists who met w i t h foreign affairs advisor
Henry Kissinger were unanimous in their opposition to the
anti-missile system.
* ., .
THE NUCLEAR NONPROLIFERATION TREATY won
an early test vote in the Senate yesterday as the first of
a series of moves to modify the agreement was rejected.
A proposal, sponsored by Sen. Sam J. Ervin (D-N.C.), ask-
ed that U.S. approval of the treaty be contingent on an under-
standing it involved no commitments to defend smaller na-
tions from "nuclear aggression." The Ervin proposal was de-
feated by a ,vote of 6G1-30.
Sen. J. W. Fulbright (D-Ark.), chairman of the Foreign
Relations Committee, said efforts to modify the treaty at
this late stage would require an extensive new round of in-
ternational negotiations and would only serve to delay its
passage by the Senate.
Opponents of the treaty, with no apparent hope of block-
ing the required two-thirds vote of approval, are concentrat-
ing on efforts to modify the U.S. position.
FRENCH WORKERS staged a 24-hour strike yester-
day to demand higher wages from the government.
President Charles de Gaulle accused the leaders of the
strike of attempting to pulverize the nation, the economy and
the franc. De Gaulle pledged to defend all three.
The millions of workers who t o o k part in yesterday's
walkout are demanding wage increases of at least 10 per cent.
The government maintains such an increase would be infla-
tionary.
The wage demands had encouraged last week's gold rush
across Europe on the theory the franc might be devalued.
Gold prices dropped sharply in yesterday's trading.
GOLDA MEIR was inaugurated as Israeli prime min-
ister yesterday while Egyptian and Israeli troops dueled
along the Suez Canal.
Mrs. Meir indicated she would follow the hard-line policy
of her predecessor, the late Levi Eshkol, in holding the Arab
territory the Israelis acquired in the six day war of June, 1967.
Each side accused the other of starting yesterday's inci-
dent, which lasted nearly six hours.
The Israelis charged the Egyptians had twice ignored ap-
peals by United Nations observers for a cease-fire. The Egyp-
tians said that Israel was responsible for the slow response
to the UN appeals. A third UN call for a cease-fire ended the
shooting.
THE APOLLO ASTRONAUTS will be brought down
on schedule tomorrow morning, despite turbulent weath-
er in the prime recovery area.
The announcement from Mission Control yesterday came
amid the astronauts' reports that there was a brewing storm
200 miles southwest of Bermuda where Apollo 9 is scheduled
to land at 10:24 a.m. tomorrow.
If the landing area is changed Apollo's flight would be
shortened or lengthened accordingly.
* - *
NORTH VIETNAMESE TROOPS unleashed three at-
tacks yesterday near Saigon in what US officers said
marked the beginning of a new phase of their enemy's
offensive.
All the attacks, which occurred about 50 miles north-
west of Saigon, were repulsed by the Allies.
US officers said they were convinced that Saigon re-
mained the main objectiveof the new offensive.
* . .
THE SOVIET UNION took the unprecedented step of
formally briefing West Germany on the Chinese-Soviet
dispute.
Soviet ambassador to West Germany Semyon Tsarapkin

asked Chancellor Kurt Kiesinger to join the Soviets against
what he termed the threat to Asia of Peking's "chauvinistic"
foreign policies.
German government spokesman said Tsarapkin re-
quested the meeting "urgently," but added that he assumed
Moscow was undertaking similar briefings in other Western
capitals.

Shakespeare s
HAMLET
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THE SEVENTH
ANN ARBOR FILM FESTIVAL
MARCH 11-16, 1969
Architecture and Design Auditorium
SCREENINGS at 7:00, 9:00 and 11:00 P.M. (excluding Saturday)
SATURDAY MATINEE at 3:00 P.M.

LITTLE CLUB
featuring "The Six of Spades"
League Snack Bar

I

I

U OF D CARNY
March 14-16
Rides-Games-Movies
Side Shows-Midway
AND
FREE LIVE SHOWS
BOB SEGER
SYSTEM
8 P.M., Friday, Mar. 14
0
ROTARY
CONNECTION
8 P.M., Saturday, Mar. 15
Red, White &
Blues Band-. . .
Poor Richard's Almanac
U of D Corny Opens
Fri., 6; Sat., 1; Sun., 1 :30
State Fair Coliseum

Today at 1:15-5:05-9:05
inh PAULNEWANA Wdca!n
rachel
Today at 3:25-7:15

I

HELD OVER,
6 Academy Award Nominations

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E -

....

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