100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 11, 1969 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-03-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PQge Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, March 1 l ; 1969

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuea say itrMarch1i..rji: 1969

I

LAST DAY
for
ExctieCouncil Petitions

'

Available Student Offices
2nd floor Union

L

J

i

I

,1

SECOND ANNUAL VANDENBERG LECTURE
March 12,- 1969
DEAN. FRANCIS 0. WILCOX
School of Advanced International Studies
.PRESIDENT NIXON,
THE CONGRESS
and
FOREIGN POLICY
Wednesday, 12 March
Amphitheatre
Horace H. Rackham Building

WELCOME
STUDENTS!
* DISTINCTIVE COLLEGIATE
HAIRSTYLING for Men -
" 8 Hairstylists
THE DASCOLA BARBERS
Near Michigan Theatre
Rent your
Roommate with
a 'Classified Ad
ID E AL F OR:
FAMILY MEALS, GET TOGETHERS,
PICNICS, LATE EVENING SNACKS
Phone your order ahead for
immediate pick-up service
MISTER O
FAMILY R i' T

TechICers gr(
By ELLIOTT BERRY favored Michigan Tech raced away,
For a brief three-minute inter- with a 7-4 victory.
After an inspiring 8-4 Wolverine
Saturday neight's WCHA regional victory over Minnesota the night
before, only WCHA regular season
championship game at the Coli- champion Tech, which qualified
seum it looked as though the Wol- for the finals with a 4-2 victory
verine Icers might be on their way over Michigan State, stood in the
to becoming the darkhorse NCAA way of a Wolverine appearance
hockey champions. in the NCAA championship tour-
But after another eight minutes nament at Colorado Springs this
had elapsed, the Michigan dark- Weekend.

i W-\Mb

WCHA

regional

horse had pulled up lame, and

: r} :................................

urday night obviously unawed by
the WCHA's first place finishers
despite their three losses to them
earlier this season, After an early
Tech barrage, which saw high-
scoring Huskie Al Karlander put
Tech into the lead with a power-
play goal, the Wolverine offense
became aggressive and carried
the play to the Huskies.
Sophomore Merle Falk collected
a power-play goal with less than

1

t;:
;q

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
SCHOOL OF MUSIC AND DEPARTMENT OF ART
Is Pleased To Announce
THIE SECRET MARRIAGE
(an opera by Cimarosa, sun'g in English)
MARCH 20, 21, 22-8:00 P.M.
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
ALL TICKETS $3.00
Mail orders accepted. Make checks pa'yable to "The University of Michigan." Send self-
addressed, stamped envelope to School of Music Opera, Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104. Box Office opens Monday, March 17, 12:30-5:00 P.M.
GOOD SEATS STILL AVAILABLE

Larry Paradise (
HAL
To ProtestE
Firings of
GENDELL an
WEDNESDAY
MARCH 12
Noon, Diag

The Wolverines skated out Sat- two minutes to play in the first
period to even the contest at 1-1
and set the stage for the season-
deciding second stanza.
At the 5:41 mark of the middle
period Michigan's '"hero-of-the-
day" Falk, standing in a crowd in
front of the Gopher net, took a
pass from linemate Dave Perrin
and blasted it past Huskie net-
minder Gordon McRae to send
the Wolverines into 2-1 lead.
Less than four minutes later the
hulking right winger a g a i n
brought the wildly partisan capa-
city crowd to its feet when he com-
pleted his dramatic hat-trick. In-
tercepting a clearing pass at the
Tech blue line, Falk skated in and
drilled a perfect 20-footer into the
upper lefthand corner of the Hus-
kie net to give the Wolverines a
two-goal bulge.
At this point it appeared that
INthe Wolveiines were going to be
able to overcome the loss of cap-
tain Paul Domm, who saw his
career come to a slightly prema-
tune end when he received a match
penalty for slashing in the first
period.
"I really thought we had them
on the run after Falk's third goal,"
lamented Renfrew, but it didn't
take long for Tech to burst the
SWolverine bubble.
The Wolverines' third goal ig-
nited the Huskies as they swarm-
._i ed around Michigan goalie Jim
Keough until Karlander scored his
second goal of the evening in a
wild goal-mouth scramble.
Karlander's goal seemed to
shake the previously unshakable
Daily-Andy Sacks Wolverines as they lapsed into a
j ;ser ies of crucial defensive mis-
10), the Loner takes, which were reminiscent of
those which plagued Michigan be-
fore the Wolverines embarked on
their six game win streak.
Bythe time the buzzer sounded
end the second period Michi-
gan had watched the Huskies
pounce on their mistakes for three
more unanswerable goals.
"We gave them'the puck in our'
Political
Profs..
Your
d MAYERa
Subscription
SPEAKER:
BERT GARSKOFF, Today
""U764-0558

ties." noted Renfrew.
Michigan played tighter hockey
in the third period but they,
couldn't overcome the devastation
of the latter half of the second
stanza.
"The final score was certainly
no indication of the closeness of
this game," Renfrew empasized.
"With a break or two we could
have won it, but they were t h e
better team tonight."
If the final scone was not , n-
dicative of the playsSaturday
night, it was even less so Friday
night as Michigan broke open a
tight contest in the third period to
defeat Minnesota.
The two teams battled almost
evenly for more than two periods
and it wasn't until the 11:19 mark
of the final period that Michigan
reopened a two goal lead and put
the game away.
The play which clinched the
victory for the Wolverines had to
be the finest offensive effort of

Gopher drive, Gross picked up the
puck deep in his own zone and
raced the length of the' ice
through the astonished Minnesota
team and slid the puck past net-
minder Murray McLaughlin to
give Michigan a 6-4 lead. It was
Gross' second goal of the game,
doubling his season's total and for
goalie Jim Keough the assist was
the first and only point of his col.
legiate career.
The wild second period saw sev-
en goals scored, four by Michigan
and three by Minnesota. The big
goal for the Wolverines in t h a t
period was Lars Hansen's 25 foot-
er with Michigan shorthanded.
Gross, Falk, and Doug Galbraith
added Michigan's other second
period markers.
With the season ended for the
Wolverines Renfrew took the 11-
berty of praising the attitude of
his players, "This wasn't the best
team I've ever had but I'd like to
be able to coach these kind of boys
every year."

-Daily-Andy Sacks
MINNESOTA NETMINDER MURRAY McLACHLAN wanders
out of his net to close the door on Wolverine Icers Barney Paschak
(foreground] and Brian Slack in a regular-season encounter
won by the Gophers, 6-3. However, the Wolverines turned the
tables last Friday, whipping the pesky Minnesotans, 8-4, in the
opening game of the WCHA tournampent.
own zone and you can't do that senior defenseman Phil Gross' col-
against a team like Tech; they legiate career.
make the most of their opportuni- After Keough turned away a

0

no
oI

*

I

I

'p
4

I

Discussions with
WILLIAM HINTON

Where's It At-
Around this University, it's everywhere. There's plenty
so each individual can find his or her own thing. In
University Housing you'll be near enough to the action to
know where it's at-and enough friends to do it with.
Concerts, chess, skiing, operas, talk, dancing, sports
-you name it and there's someone close who likes that, too,
if you want company. There are also a lot of someones around
who will leave you alone, if you don't want company. In short,

Author of <.,;,::.:<;~,,
FANSHEN,
It tells the story of rural China in turmoil, when human"<:'>::sr-,r.
feelings were at their most acute, And it is told with a
remarkable evenness of temper and a rare understanding
of human weaknesses and strengths. The lesson of Long4
Bow village, so movingly and compassionately recorded
by Mr. Hinton, should be studied by all who have a per-
sonal concern for the future of the majority of mankind.
4-5:30-Lane Hall Auditorium<
Open seminar for all students
R!00f D __-_Ennf,,a.rL Nnnce%

O~*1 tt
PENINGS FOR ENGINEERS ts
SHIP STRUCTURAL DESIGN * SHIPBOARD ELECTRICAL
SYSTEMS DESIGN * SHIPBOARD ELECTRONICS
SYSTEMS DESIGN & EVALUATION " SHIPBOARD
MISSILE SYSTEMS EVALUATION * SHIP PROPULSION &
PIPING SYSTEMS DESIGN * SHIPBOARD VENTILATION
& AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEMS DESIGN * PRODUCTION
& FACILITIES ENGINEERING
EXCELLENT FEDERAL
SERVICE BENEFITS

*1

I

I 1

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan