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March 11, 1969 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1969-03-11

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Tuesday, March 11, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

. Page Three

Tuesday, March 11, 1969 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page ThreA

TAKES STUDENTS' SIDE:
Education convention di*

College Press Service
CHICAGO (CPS)-Most col-
* leges and universities will profit
from student protests if their
administrations are free from
outside political pressure.
That finding is suggested in
data gathered in the American
Association for Higher Educa-
tion's (AAHE) campus govern-
4 ance study and in lessons from
the crisis at San Francisco State
College.
It was sketched' in a talk
last week by/George C. Stern, a
Syracuse University Psycho-
logy professor, at the AAHE's
annual convention. Some 2703
administrators and f a c u 1 t y
members attended the meet-
ing, which h a d as its theme
"The Agony and The Promise
of America."
Declaring that ."A university
kept, open at bayonet point is
neither a "university" nor 'open',
Stern scored political interfer-
ence in the internal affairs of
embattled San Francisco State.
He said the continuance of uni-
versities as "the sole institution
in America dedicated to under-
standing, rational responses to
problems hinges on our keeping
+ free from outside forces."
"To disregard the student
revolt, to dismiss it as the work
of' a tiny fringe of agigators
manipulating issues that are

entirely beyond the control of
the educational enterprise, is to
risk and encourage politicization
of the university-to lose the
ideal of an independent intellec-
tual community, not regain it,"
professor Stern said.
In his talk on "The Impactr
of Campus Environment on Stu-'
dent Unrest," Stern said the
AAHE study indicates that
schools which strees oppor-
tunities for personal growth
have "far fewer problems" than
those which do not. "The lar-
gest number of problems of all
vironments" that are appressive
with rigid, highly-controlled en-
types are reported from schools
and academically trivial, he said.
Stern suggested that schools
loosen their regidity by opening
the undergraduate curriculum
to new programs freed from re-
strictions of graduate school
preparation. But sometimes of-
fering alternative courses to
disenchanted students doesn't
work, he noted. What was view-
ed by some educators as utopia
at San Francisco State turned
into disaster.
When Governor Ronald Rea-
gan cut the school's budget, ad-
mission standards had to be
raised and Blabk enrollment
dropped from 11 per cent to 3.6
per cent. "The entirely under-
standable bitterness of the Black

intellectual community exploded
into violence . . . ." And the
"continued interference" by the
statewide trustees appointed by
the Governor led to the trouble
the school is experiencing today,
he said.
"Enough intelligent curiosity"
about the student movement is
not being exercised by the jour-
nalism profession, Robert Mac-
Neil of the British Broadcasting
Corp. told a discussion group at
the conference.
Journalism is "'too much a
part of the 'establishment' in
American life . . . . It is a de-
fender of the status quo . . . . It
is too much a part of the society
it observes."

scusses protest
"I have a feeling," MacNeill Protesting for acader
said, "that the generation that form generates a feeling
is now busily tearing the uni- levance" because it enab
versities apart and fighting the dents "for the first time
police is moving this country the agenda for educati
into a new era, morally and in- cussion," said Michael
tellectually, and it may be a formerly of the National1
very good moment for the Association, at an af
'Fourth Estate' to ask, as the discussion 'on teaching.
students are, where we are levance in one's ed
going." threatens one's freedo
The former NBC reporter said cause it makes choices m
"a more open line between the less, he added.
thinking community in the uni- Barbara Bishop, a stu
versities and the fourth estate" Northwestern University
is necessary if more news is to cized college teaching fo
be raised above "the sensation- ing students to fit an e
alism and trivialization of new ment instead of allowin
thought and the stereotyped to mold an environmen
handling of complex events." themselves. "The aurat

m
g
S
t
e
';
d
Y,
r
en
rg
t
0

discipline
ic re- fessionalism must go," she said.
of re- "Students are no longer willing
es stu- to accept didactic preaching
to set from on high. They want to
n dis- challenge, tear apart, and par-
Peretz, ticipate in knowledge."
tudent "Combining action with aca-
ernoon demia" was recommended by
"Irre- Charles V. Hamilton of Roose-
acation velt University during a session
" be- on curricular changes to meet
aning- the needs of a Black society.
In-field experience is especially
ent at important at a school with a
criti- sizeable and growing Black stu-
mold- dent body near a Black com-
iviron- munity, he said. Hamilton also
them urged addition of' Black cur-
to fit ricula to 'all-white, suburban-
f pro- locked' colleges."

CRUSADER GRUENING:

'

Re tired
(EDITOR'S NOTE: Crusading Er-
nest Gruening is 82 years old now,
no longer a senator but still cru-
sading. The former senator from
Alaska, who lost to Mike Gravel
last November, writers for an in-
tellectual weekly magazine, s t ill
fighting against the Vietnam war
and overpopulation.)
WASHINGTON OP) - Ernest
Gruening began his unorthodox
career in his first newspaper job
in 1912. Now, at 82 and a distin-
guished former senator, he is once
more using the printed word as
his lance.
In 1923 Gruening's name ap-
peared on the masthead as man-
aging editor of The Nation-an
influential, intellectual weekly.
That was long before he midwifed
Alaska to statehood, long before
he became one of the Senate's
most eloquent doves on the. Viet-
nam war, a war he calls "an un-
mitigated tragedy and disaster."
Now, deposed ;from his Senate
seat by a younger man, his name
appears again on The Nation's
credits as editorial associate, and
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students of the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michi-
gan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $9 by
carrier, $10 by mail.

he is launch
old target-
"I consid
the most sex
faces," Gru
terview.
He said1
cerned abou
and interns
eral, but
criticism fo
"The cou
and it's nov
said of Vie
"It's surp
people don'
the disaster
which will 1
of the live
born."
He says,
over $100 1
sum not
neglected i
care of our:
issue," he a
In 1964!
hearings on
population
ated with
Committee-
which is try
ment activi
"My inte
trol, arose
ago," he e
"When I
and when

ing a new attack on an
-overpopulation.
[er it, next to peace,
rious problem mankind
ening said in an in-
he is also deeply con-
at the Pueblo incident.
Ltional spying in gen-
reserves his sharpest
r the Vietnam war.

cases in the slums of Boston I
saw these large families living in
tenements, children sickly, moth-
er sickly, unable to support this
ever-increasing brood. I felt then
it was imperative that parents
have access to the knowledge
which would enable them to de-
cide how many children they
should have and at what inter-
vals."

already
little ea
commen
His n
tion,C
writing
editoria
an aut
He -
newspap
managir
Trih L..

entry has been misled Gruening went into journalism Trmune
w pretty apparent," he soon after Harvard Medical brief to
tnam. School and, at managing editor managir
rising to me that more of the Boston Traveler, wrote an His fi
t realize the extent of editorial opposing a state law that its Her
, the consequences of banned publicizing of information Public1
be with us for the rest about contraceptives, private
s- of the people now " .oThe
Thiseditorialruwasconside said, ha
"We will have spent so perilous," Gruening called, spyingr
illion on this war-a "that my boss, the editor of the Tonkin
recoverable-we have morning paper, had the presses tion of
n consequence to take stopped and the editorial ex cidental
really burning domestic tracted. on the1
adds. Later, a's editor of the Boston "SoI
Gruening held Senate Journal, Gruening wrote a simi- "it's ab
the problem of over- lar editorial. It ran, but we lost investig
and he now if affili- a lot of advertising," he notes. snoopin
the Population Crisis The population problem is dif- Even
-a voluntary group ferent now and larger because of Gruenin
iing to expand govern- the population explosion, Gruen- Congre&
ty in the area. ing said. editoria
rest in population con- "It took 1,850 years to bring Congres
over a half century about a population of one billion. venting
xplains. Now, 118 years later, that popu- to Sou
was in medical school lation is more than tripled and it consent
going on obstetrical will double unless we do some- "Invo
thingabout it every 30 years. We ing call
1 aelost the battle already, we on.

have more. people on this
arth than we can support,"
nted Gruening.
new position on The Na-
Gruening says, includes
an occasional articles or
d. He also is working on
obiography.
worked on three Boston
pers and then became
rg editor of The New York
in World War I. After a
ur in the Army, he became
rng editor of The Nation.
irst book was "Mexico And
itage." The second, "The
Pays," was an expose of
power companies.
United States, Gruening
asn't had much luck with
and he cited the Gulf of
affair that led to escala-
the Vietnam war, the ac-
I firing by Israel last year
Liberty, and the Pueblo.
I think," says Gruening
bout time that Congress
ated this international
g in depth."
though he is out of office
ng continues to prod the
ss. He has prepared an
1 for his magazine urging
ss to pass legislation pre-
draftees from being sent
theast Asia without their
t.
'luntary servitude," Gruen-
ed it. And the crusade goes

journalist still writes

Sthe
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
PENTAGON OFFICIALS said yesterday a decision
to shift Sentinel antimissile sites farther from cities
would rule out any significant expansion of the program
for years.
The option to shift the sites was among those considered
by President Nixon as a means of easing public concern
that an accidental explosion might destroy a nearby city.
The Pentagon denies this possibility, but has said minor
distance adjustments in the site proposals would be accept-
able.
Nixon expected to go ahead with the Sentinel program
in some modified form in the next day or two.
CRIMINAL DEFENDANTS whose conversations or
"premises" were bugged by federal agents have a right to
examine the government transcripts, the Supreme Court
ruled yesterday.
In a 5 - 3 decision, the court, in' an opinion written by
Associate Justice Byron White, disagreed with a government
position stating that examination of such documents should
be done by a federal judge instead of the defendant's lawyers.
COMMUNIST GUNNERS yesterday attacked the an-
cient Vietnamese capital city of Hue for the first time in
the 16-day-old spring offensive.
Hue, hardest hit of any major city during the Communist
Tet offensive of 1968,,had been spared new attacks while the
Communists pounded Saigon and scores of provincial and
district capitals with rockets and mortars.
ABOUT 250,000 EGYPTIANS gave a hero's funeral
yesterday to their late army chief Gen. Abdel Moneim
Riad.
The mourners chanted vows of vengance against Israel
in one of the largest processions in Egypt's history. President
Gamal Abdel Nasser led the line of marchers accompanying
the flag-draped coffin through Cairo streets.
Riad was wounded fatally Sunday in the second day of an
artillery duel across the Suez canal.
THE APOLLO 9 ASTRONAUTS were puzzled by warn-
ing lights that flashed after they fired their rocket engine
yesterday.
The rocket 'was fired to line up for a final rocket burn
that will bring them home Thursday.
The warnings came from the propellant utilization gaug-
ing system, a fuel gauge on the spacecraft. Other data, how-
ever, showed the crew had enough fuel to finish their flight.
The lights first came on during earlier firings both aboard
rthe spacecraft and in mission control.
* . .
FRENCH ECONOMIC UNCERTAINTY yesterday
boosted gold prices to a new high of $48.41 on the French
market.
The release of a survey of Western Europe's central
bankers showing that France is still financially strong enough
to cope with the present outflow of francs beyond its borders
did little to stabilize the gold value.
The immediate cause for the nervousness was a 24-hour
general strike French. labor unions were preparing in order
to back up demands for higher wages. It would be the first
major work stoppage in France since last spring.
WIDE-SPREAD JOB GAINS boosted the nations total
employment rate to an all-time high, the government re-
ported yesterday.
The February figure of 76.2 million employed workers
represents the fifth straight month.of increased employment.
The unemployment rate remained at a 15-year low of 3.3
per cent, or about 2.9 million persons, for the third straight
month.
* * *
THE YUGOSLAV COMMUNIST PARTY CONGRESS
opening. yesterday was boycotted by the five nations that
invaded Czechoslovakia last August.
An announcement carried by the Tanjug news agency
said the five nations and the Czechoslovak Communists cited
"disagreement with certain Yugoslav attitudes" as the reason
for refusing invitations.
This underlines the split in the Communist sphere over
the intervention in Czechoslovakia to halt that country's

reform course.
The boycotting countries, Poland, East Germany, Hun-
gary, Bulgaria, and the Soviet Union all took part in the
invasion.

PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM

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HELD O ER OXNATIONAL. GEERALCORPORATION UX
H EL D OER FOX EASTERN TE^EATES
6TH WEEK FOR VILLaGE
375 No. MAPLE RD.-"769.1300

The Theatre
Will Be Emptied
After 7:00 P.M.
Showing Fri. -Sat.

' Nominated for 2 Academy Awards
* BEST Picture * BEST Director y

PARAMOUNT PICTURES prewsts
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FwAco ZEFFIRLuu
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The University of Michigan Players
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THE
CHERRY ORCHARD,
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
MARCH 12-15
8:00 P.M.
Saturday Matinee--March 15
2:30 P.M.
ADMISSION

ENDLESS WINTER
continues with a trip north
MARCH 14-16
wherever the snow is
also ELECTIONS
Meeting TUES., MARCH 11, 7:30
UNION Room -2-X

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