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March 04, 1969 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-03-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-

Tuesday, March 4, J969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THE., ,-.H.,. ...l- Y

Page Seven

i

Cagers
By CHRIS TERAS
Purdue's King is finally Th e
King. After only four years forl
him, but 29 for the school, George'
King's Boilermakersare BigTen
Basketball champs.
Tonight at 8:30 p.m. Michigan
attempts to hold on to its second
place position as the team playsE
against Purdue in Lafayette, In-
diana. for]
Other than the scramble for se- pro

i

try
T
MICHIGAN
Dennis Stewart (6-6)
Bob Sullivan (6-4)
Rudy Tomjanovich (6-8
Ken Maxey (5-9)
Dan Fife (6-2)

ascent of Purdue's

Mount

t

)

he Lineups

F
F
C
G
G

PURDUE
Tyrone Bedford (6-5)
George Faerber (6-51)
Charlie Davis (7-0)
Bill Keller (5-10Y)
Rick Mount (6-4)

rmer Herm Gilliam, who will
bably sit out with an ankle in-

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
ELLIOTT BERRY

jury, the team has still has a lot
going for it. The front line in-
cludes 7'0" 250-pound c e n t e r,
Charlie Bavis, and 6'5"1/2 George
Faerber who weighs in at 225.
The other forward will be either
Tyrone Bedford, a starter on last
year's 9-5 third-place squad, or
little 6'2" Larry Weatherford.
Both have made valuable contri-
butions coming from the bench
and in starting.
In the backcourt are M o u n t
and Bill Keller. Both achieved
''7 - _.T _ L T~

the Wolverines will have to con-
tend with the added rigors of
playing in Purdue arena. Coach
King attributes home success to
the fans. "The crowd reaction is
a big help. We've had complete,
sell-outs for the last two years,
and this interest and enthusiasm
seems to provide a spark." Th e
Boilermakers have not lost in
their two-year-old arena since
New Mexico State in December of
1967.
Michigan, despite having to sur-
mount such overwhelming obstac-
les, is hardly incapable of beating
Purdue. Bob Sullivan's ankle was
badly sprained Friday, but he
played for awhile Saturday, and is
expected to be at full strength
tomorrow. Sullivan has come on
strong in the last few weeks.

Commenting on Mark Henry's
defensive play last Saturday, As-
sistantCoach Fred Snowden said,
"Mark was the turning point for
us in an otherwise slow ball game.
He was the catalyst we needed to
fire us up."
Besides these Wolverine bright
spots, they may profit from Pur-
due troubles. First, Rick Mount
is one of the nation's best shoot-
ers, but he seems to be weak in
other facets of the game. In
rebounding for instance, he typi-
cally totaled only 2 in last years'
104-94 loss in Ann Arbor, and has
averaged only 2.7 for the season.
As for defense, King commented,
"Mount has played adequately for
us this season." It remains to be
seen whether "adequate" is suf-
ficient tonight.
Another weak point may be the
Boilermakers' ball handling. Gil-
liam and Keller, voted the team's
Most Valuable Players for the
present campaign, usually bring
the ball up court. Without Gilliam
in there, some backcourt pressure
applied by the Wolverines m a y
trouble any inept ball handlers.

-Dail-Andy Sacks
WOLVERINE STAR RUDY TOMJANOVICH leaps high above
the crowd for one of his game-leading total of sixteen rebounds
in Michigan's victory over the Badgers last Saturday. Wolverine
hopes for an upset of Purdue once against center around
Tomjanovich,
1MW THINCLADS THIRD:
BadgersTriumphant

cond, another record will be at
stake. Purdue's Rick Mount needs
just over 60 points in his last two
conference games to surpass Ohio
State's Gary Bradds' single sea-
son average of 33.9. Last Satur-
day, Mount scored 43 to help his
team wrap up the crown. Coach
King, however, claims that his
team "won't be feeding Mount any
more than usual."
"Usual," of course, means when-
sever the 6'4" gunner is halfway
open. This has been Purdue's style
in the last few years with names
like Terry Dischinger and D a v e
Schellhase, but the Indiana gang
did not get to be number one
with just one shooter to c a r r y
the team.
Even without all-around per-

"Mr. Basketball" distinction,
which is an award given to the
outstanding player in the annual
Indiana High School State
Championship tournament.
Besides this wealth. of talent,

Michigan comes off high note

Last
cagersI

By DAVE HANNES
Saturday the Wolverine
gave a performance which

By ERIC SIEGEL.
They were wrong when they
rated Harry Truman a 2 million
w vote underdog to John Dewey in
the 1948 election and they were
wrong when they rated the Jets
a two million point underdog to
the Colts in the 1969 Super Bowl.
But they were right when they
rated the Wisconsin thinclads the'
over-dogs in the Big Ten indoor
track and field championships this
past we9kend in Champaign, Il-
linois, as the Badgers galloped to
an easy victory, rolling up 65
points compared to 42 for second-
place Indiana and 35 for third-
place Michigan.
Wisconsin's depth was the b i g
factor in their victory, as t h e
Badgers placed at least one man
among the top five finishers in
every event except two. The Bad-
ger quartet also finished second
behind Michigan State in the mile
relay.
"We're all very proud of each
other," commented Wisconsin
head coach "Rut" Walter. "It,
takes a great team effort to win
a championship, and that's what
we got."
The extent of the Badger's
depth was apparent in Fridayj
night's preliminaries, as Wisconsin
qualified eleven men for Satur-
day's final wheats, and seven more
for the semi-finals.
According to Wolverine h e a d
coach Dave Martin, "They (t h e
Badgers) had it pretty well sewn
tip Friday night. When a team
has two qualifiers to every one of
yours, you need an awful lot of

breaks if you're going to overtake
them."
But the Wolverines didn't even
get the few breaks they needed
for a second place finish.
In the only field event Friday
night, Michigan's Ira Russel took
third place with a leap of 23'
6". Earlier, however, Russel h a d
jumped 24', which would h a v e
given him a first place finish, but
he just barely touched the sand
in the pit and his effort was dis-
qualified.
In the high jump, the s t o r y
was about the same, as Gary
Knickerbocker hit a below par
6'7", just missing at the n e x t
height, which would have given
him a third instead of a fourth
place finish.
And in the 1000 yard run and
the mile,- Wolverines Ron Kutch-
inski and Rick Storrey both set
Michigan records, but could only
manage third place finishes, as
Northwestern's Ralph Schulz
equalled the world indoor mark
in the 1000 and Wisconsin's Ray
Arrington who also set a record in
the half-mile, set a new mile
mark.
In the 300 yard dash, Leon
Grundstein finished fourth, right
behind Indiana's Rick Highbaugh,
and Wolverines Lorenzo Mont-
gomery, in the 440, and Sol Espie,
in the 60, were both barely nosed
>ut of fifth place finishes.
For his part, Wisconsin's coach
Walter, who will retire this June.
was elated. "It was great to
win," he said. "It's a great re-
tirement present."

I..__.._.__ , . I

it

I

Big Ten Standings

1

W L
Purdue 11 1
MICHIGAN 7 5
Ohio State 7- 5
Illinois 7 5
Michigan State 6 6
Iowa 5 7
Northwestern 5 7
Wisconsin 4 8
Minnesota 4 8
Indiana 4 8
TONIGIjT'S GAMES
MICHIGAN at Purdue
Michigan State at Illinois
Iowa at Minnesota
Indiana at Ohio State
Northwestern at Wisconsin

Pet.
.917
.583
.583
.583
.500
.417
.417
.333
.333
.333

was good enough to win although
far from their best effort of the
season.
Coach John Orr admitted that
his team has played better but
was extremely satisfied with the
victory, especially when consid-
ering the day's upset defeats suf-
fered by' North .Carolina, South'
Carolina, Kentucky, and St.
John's, and the overtime period
UCLA needed to top California
84-77.
"I think that we played real
well, even brilliantly at times,"
said Orr. "You've got to remem-
ber 'that we were playing a hell of
a good team. I'd have to say that
their personnel is as good as ours
and Sullivan's injury didn't make
matters any easier for us."
The 6-4 senior forward was a
'very doubtful starter' as of last
Friday but made the, starting line-
up the next day despite his ankle
sprain. "He wanted to play real
badly since he is from Wisconsin
and it was hisslast home game
so I put him in," Orr went on.

This Week in Sports
TONIGHT
BASKETBALL-Michigan at Purdue, 8:30 p.m.
FRIDAY
HOCKEY-WCHA Playoffs at Coliseum
Michigan State vs. Michigan Tech, 6:30 p.m.
Minnesota vs. Michigan, 9:00 p.m.
,SATURDAY
BASKETBALL-Michigan at Ohio State
HOCKEY-WCHA Playoffs at Coliseum, 8:00 p.m.
INDOOR TRACK-USTFF Championships at Milwaukee

-Daily-Andy Sacks
MICHIGAN'S DENNIS STEWART jumps over Al Henry (54) of
Wisconsin for another two points. Stewart's 21-point perform-
ance Saturday paved the way for the 84-79 Badger defeat.
The Wolverines play their next to last game of the season at
Purdue tonight, hoping to gain a solid grip on second place.

I

"Sullivan didn't practice a 11
week and on Friday his ankle was
so swollen I never thought he'd
play .but our trainer did a real
fine job in getting Bob ready.
Unfortunately he was slowed
down quite a bit so I sat him out
almost all of the second half."
The Wolverines started out with
their zone defense but the Bad-
gers were able to penetrate inside
for many easy buckets forcing
Michigan to revert to the o f t e n
unsuccessful man-to-man which
they employed earlier in the year.

and Willie Edwards, both of whom
played good all-around games.
Henry, a 6-0 walk-on who scored
20 points against Duke last De-
cember, played "an outstanding
game" according to Coach Orr, as
the junior performed well with the
man-to-man and found the range
on three of five field goal at-
tempts and one free throw for
seven total points.
Edwards, who, like Sullivan,
Dennis Stewart, Dave McClellan,
and Captain Ken Maxey, made his
last appearance at the Events
Building, put in two second half
baskets for the Wolverine cause.
Orr described Edwards' p l a y
as "great defensively.'' "Jim John-
son was hurting us a lot in the
first half but Willie really cooled
him down," Orr noted.

RADICAL
CAU CUS
General Meeting
-TON IGHT-

___

SPORTS BULLETS:

Calihan retires at U of D-
Conigliaro back in action
By The Associated Press Boston Red Sox in their exhibi-
f DETROIT - Robert "Bo" tion opener against the Chicago
Calihan announced yesterday the White Sox Friday.
end of a 21-year career as head * *
basketball coach at the University 0 ST. LOUIS-Bob Gibson be-

,

I
Boston
Montreal
Detroit
New York
Toronto
Chicago,
St. Louis
Oakland
Los Angeles
Philadelphia
Minnesota
Pittsburgh

Professional Standings

-)

r
1

of Detroit. came the highest-salaried star in
The 50-year-old Calihan said he the history of the St. Louis Cardi-
planned to devote his full energies nals yesterday as he and five
to the position of director of ath- other key players agreed to terms
letics, a post he has held for five for a total of around $425,000.
years. Gibson was believed to received
* * * about $125,000, center fielder Curt
0 WINTER HAVEN, Fla. -- Flood around $88,000, left fielder
Tony Conigliaro, attempting a Lou Brock an estimated $87,000,
comeback after suffering a severe third baseman Mike Shannon
eye injury when struck by a pitch around $52,000, pitcher Nelson
in 1967, was named yesterday as Briles, around $38,000 and pitcher
the'starting rightfielder for the Ray Washburn, a reported $35,000.

However, this time the Wolver-
ines' former defense turned the
trick in spite of one streak in
which the Badgers outscored
Michigan 12-0 just prior to the
buzzer ending the first half.
Before Wisconsin's outburst the
Wolverines had built up a 40-27
lead but could not stand the
knockout punch as they saw a size-
able lead disintegrate just as they
did against Illinois and Minnesota
earlier this season at the Events
Building.
Orr was admittedly baffled as
to the reason for his team's in-
consistency and inability to i c e
some victories sooner than they
do, but he refused to blame the
team for their temporary s lu m p
against Wisconsin saying, "T h e y
(the Badgers) got really hot dur-
ing that stretch and when t h a t
happens there isn't much you can
do about it."
Orr went most of the second
half with reserves Mark Henry

8:00

Room, 3511, SAB

r -

N H L

East Division
W L T Pts. GF GA

37
39
32
33
28
30

13
17
24
24
21
29

12
8
9
6
13
6

86 244
86 226
73 208
72 1827
69 189
66 238F

170
168
177
161
170
207

Nest Division
33 20 12
24 30 10
21 33 8
13 33 18
16 37 10
14 39 10

' NBA
Eastern Division
W L1
Baltimore 50 18
Philadelphia 49 22
New York 47 24
Boston 42 28
xCincinnati 34 36
Detroit 27 44
Milwaukee 23 48
Western Division
Los Angeles 47 24
Atlanta 43 29
San Francisco 34 38
San Diego 29 40
Chicago 28 42
x~eattle 26 45
Phoenix 15 56
xLate game not included.
Yesterday's Games
Philadelphia 143, Milwaukee]
Cincinnati at Seattle late
Only games scheduled.

Pet.
.735
.686
.662
.600,
.486
.380
.329
.662
.597
.472
.420
.400
.366
.211

GB
2%
4%
9
17
244
28%
41
13/
17
21
31

r

78 177 130
58 175 212
50 151 203
44 134 197
42 159 223;
38 148 213

I

Yesterday's Result
Chicago 6, Minnesota 1
Only game scheduled

132

m

TENANTS:
THE STRIKE IS ON I
All tenants in off campus
apartments are urged to
deposit their rent in the T. U.
escrow fund.
REMEMBER -

Y kY
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.tt~a.....4......
W h a e v e T u nYYu O ,.a y
T alk c o n e rt , s k in g r e c r d s b ri g e, p la y , e g h t- o n t
le as , w r stli g, d n cin , o p ras, ice k ati g,. b s k et}ll
pepp ron piz as, bull ses ions fo k ba lad , ca dle igh
d:nrs:oke , i te l c ua:ec u e ,htd nt p w r , ii: ':::5:": ;4Y.} ;?:.',"..',~.'i-
singi g, sw m min

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Maryland.
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