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March 04, 1969 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1969-03-04

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Tuesday, March 4, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pape Three

Tuesday, March 4, 1969 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PeI Ww.TI s e

ET

NO END IN SIGHT

Thenw
UMUAHIA, Biafra (P)-This is
Biafra after more than 19 months
of war:
-All its major cities are gone;
-Hundreds of thousands have
died of starvation or disease;
-Little fertile land or resources
are left;
-The Nigerian air force's Rus-
sian-made MIG and Ilyushin
warplanes are still unchallenged
in the sky.
Yet Biafra isstill here, smaller
but also 'better organized-and,
its leaders feel, drawing an in-
creasingly friendly eye from the
outside world.
Biafrans say morale has rarely
been higher since it seceded from
Nigeria as the result of bitter
tribal disputes and proclaimed it-
self the republic of Biafra May 31,
1967. Two months later civil war
broke out.
Some Biafrans and foreign ob-
servers believe the worst may be
over. These observers see that
Biafra somehow has "made it,"
that with the United States ard
other countries increasingly in-

ar in Biafra:

19 month stalemate

the
news today
by The Associaled Press and College Press Service

terested in the war, some diplo-
matic solution will come before
the Nigerian army can completely
occupy the Ibo tribal heartland.
The future will, tell whether
this is wishful thinking or sound
judgment.
In the last six months the led-
'eral offensive into Biafra has
slowed and the Biafrans have
used the time to consolidate. Their
mood has shifted from one of
fear, bordering on panic, to one
of self-assurance.
After the rainy season ended
last autumn, the Nigerians cap-
tured Owerri, Aba, Okigwi-all
within 35 miles in three direc-
tions from Umuahia.
Biafra shrank to a fraction of
its - original 29,000 square miles,
and the population in Biafran-
held territory dropped to per-
haps seven million from the orig-
inal 14 million.
The Biafrans were preparing
for a last-ditch stand in Umua-
hia. They say the Nigerians
made several attempts to break
through, but were beaten back
each time.

PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
presents
National Theatre of Canada
-2 NEW PRODUCTIONS-
Ben Jonso's Hilarious Satire
THE ALCHEMIST

The Nigerians say the Biafrans
suddenly acquired new firepower,
and that the federal army held
back purposely, to avoid needless
killing.
In any event, the conflict has
taken on the characteristics of
stalemate.
The Biafrans have acquired
more small arms and ammuni-
tion, most of it French and Czech,
but the balance of armament in
favor of the Nigerians does not
apear to have been significantly
changed.
Whether Biafra is a political
reality on the international level
may be a point of argument
among governments, but it is a
social and administrative reality.
Neatly uniformed policewomen
direct traffic on Umuahia's red
dirt roads. A court functions every
day, with British-educated law-
yers showing up for cases in
weather-beaten black tuxedoes.
Ojukwu's regime enforces con-
scription and civil mobilization
without significant opposition.
For many, Ojukwu seems to
have taken on the mystic aura
of a demigod. "Holy, holy, holy,"
goes a common chant sung by
recruits. Children say, "Ojukwu
another savior."j
There are many conflicting
stories about the loyalties of the
minority tribes in Biafra-the
people the Nigerians say are being
Program Information r 668-6416
ENDS WEDNESDAY
Winner of 6 Academy Awards
COLUMBIA PICTURES present.
FRED ZINNEMANN'S
FILM OF
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FOR ALL
SEASONS
From the play byr
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THURSDAY"
"RACHEL, RACHEL"
also "Heart Is the Lonely Hunter"

oppressed by the predominant
Ibos. But whether out of fear or+
loalty, the minorities have shown
no signs of rebellion here,
Neither have others, despite+
severe deprivation. Famine, mur-'
derous inflation, a lack of cur-
rency, a continuous drain of sons
and husbands for the war, have i
not led to breakdowns of law and
order on any large scale.
In the bush country, chickens
and dogs can stroll across dirt
trails with impunity-if they have
an owner-even though they+
might come within machete reach
of aehungryttribesman. On the
whole, private property remains
inviolate,
Tons of food from the Red;
Cross and church groups keep;
coming in under cover of night
at a jungle airstrip that is reg-!
ularly bombed as the planes land.
The aid has saved countless1
children, but many near the front;
are yet to be reached,. and adults1

are now beginning to feel the pain
of malnutrition themselves.
"How much longer does the
world think we will be able to go
on like this?" asked a Roman
Catholic relief official in Tome
last week after four planes had
to turn back to the Portugese
island because of bombing at the
Biafran airstrip.
Thenaid is meant for hungry
indigents, not the middle and up-
per classes of civil servants and
foreign-educated teachers, engin-
eers and scientists-the elite on
which Biafra prides itself in slow-
ly developing Africa.
These people are feeling the
pinch as beef, liquor, coffee, salt
and a host of hard goods dis-
appear.
For the common man and the,
elite alike, carbohydrate staples
are scarcer and more expensive
because of planting schedules,
and experts say the worst is yet
to come.

The hungry in Umuahia are
everywhere, and include hundreds
of wounded soldiers not attached
to regular units who make the
rounds of food depots begging for
handouts.
The Biafrans have launched a
cultivation project on the little
(and largely infertile) land left
Scientists and technicians are
struggling to mass-produce soap
and other goods not available be-
cause of the Nigerian blockade
and because raw materials are out
of reach behind enemy lines. Salt
is being imported.
The Biafrans say they will
come out all right if they keep
gaining time. In nine months to
a year, they say, they will be
practically self-sufficient in food
staples,
As they wait, their strong al-
lies like Portugal, France and
Gabon continue to help, and ad-
vocates work in the United States
and other countries continue to
get international backing.

TEN-DAY MISSION:

Apollo 9 launch flawless

LI

SPACE CENTER, Houston {P)-
The Apollo 9 astronauts, work-
ing calmly and quietly, flawlessly
performed the first key maneu-
vers yesterday in a flight that will
put America on the moon's thres-
hold or slam the door indefinite-
ly.
Air Force Cols. James A. Mc-
Divitt and David Scott and civil-
ian astronaut Russell L. Schweik-
art revealed to space for the first
time the buglike moon shop that
is essential to America's drive for
a lunar landing this summer.
After thundering into orbit
atop the mighty Saturn 5 rocket,
the world's largest, the crew ex-
ecuted the complicated docking
and extraction of the lunar land-
ing spacecraft in almost routine
fashion. Then they circled the
earth with the lunar module and
command module locked together.'
The crew then fired up the
powerful service propulsion en-

gine to test the handling charac-
teristics of the piggyback space-
crafts, a maneuver necessary to
a flight to the moon.
A signal from the ground sent
the S 4 B booster stage out'. of
sight and into a solar orbit while
the three crewmen watched.
Only minor problems appeared
with either of the machines, and
mission controllers indicated there
was nothing to indicate the flight
wouldn't continue for its full 10
days.
The space pilots, tired from
more than 12 hours of constant
labor since they were awakened
Monday morning at Cape Ken-
nedy, took off their confining
pressure space suits, ate their
first space meal and then pow-
ered down the spacecraft for the
night.
The crew was to sleep simul-
taneously throughout the mis-
sion, McDivitt and Scott on their

Shakespeare's
H AML ET :

March 25-April 6--2 Weeks Ontlyl
MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
TICKETS NOW AT PTP TICKET OFFICE

I

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DIONYSUS'I 6
REVISITED
A panel discussion with:
MR. SAUL GOTTLIEB, A director of the RADICAL REPERTORY
THEATER, New York; Associate of Mr. Schechner, Director
of DIONYSUS
MR. LARRY DEVINE, Drama Critic of the Detroit FREE PRESS,
who saw both the Detroit and Ann Arbor versions
PROF. MARVIN FELHEIM, English Dept., who invited the
Dionysus group here
LAW PROF. PAUL D. CARRINGTON, who is researching legal
aspects of the case for UAC
MONDAY, MARCH 10 at 8:00 P.M.
HILLEL FOUNDATION 663-4129 1429 Hill St.

Why should a beginning teacher have to floun-
der around before finding a position that is
satisfying? Teaching in Chicago Public Schools
brings all the instant rewards that you've been
anticipating for four years-a chance to cut
through conditions that would stifle a child's
potential, to raise the status quo, and the oppor-
tunity to fulfill your own highest sense of
achievement. .
And, teaching in Chicago is not a one-sided
affair. The Chicago Board of Education will ac-
knowledge your contribution to the betterment
of its community with one of the highest teachers
starting salaries in the nation-$7,350 for a 10
month school year, and generous additional
benefits such as fully paid health insurance, 10
days sick leave and 3 days personal leave,
annually.
Get off to a good start in your career. If
you're a graduating senior with a degree in
education, investigate teaching in the
Chicago Public Schools.
For further information see the Chicago
Representative at the Placement Office
MARCH 11
Or fill in the coupon below.

couches and Schweikart in a
sleeping bag-like arrangement
under the couches.
The only excited comment of
the day from the crew came when
a signal from the ground lighted
up the powerful rockets on the
S 4 B and sentnout of sight and
toward the sun.
Another ignition of the S 4 B
engines later sent the rocket hull
away from the earth and into an
orbit of the sun.
The rocket reached a speed of
more than a thousand miles a
minute as it flashed away from
the earth and out of contact with
the ground controllers. It was
more than 53,000 miles from earth
when its engines cut off,
About three hours after their
11 a.m. (EST) launch from Cape
Kennedy, the Apollo 9 crewmen
deftley executed the difficult
transposition and docking maneu-
ver that was critical to the suc-
cess of their flight.
Scott started the maneuvers
by separating thecommand mo-
dule from the booster, moving
away 50 feet and then skillfully
guiding the docking probe on the
command module nose into a
docking collar on the moonship,
which was still recured to the
booster.
"Everything came off just
right," McDivitt reported.
Later, the command module and
lunar module, locked together in-
to a rigid structure, was spring-
ejected from the S 4 B
"We have made a successful
ejection," said McDivitt calmly.
"Sounds beautiful," answered
the ground.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students of the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second-
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michi-
gan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $9 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
RIVER RIDGE
A Barron Development
Deol directly with the builder
Large spacious homes, located
on acre and half acre lots.
Really country estates with city
facilities. Withing walking dis-
trance of Newport Elementary
and Forsythe Junior High.
Location, space and comfort.
Bypass all city traffic, Drive
north on North Main Street to
Huron River Dr.
Go west by Bird
Rd. to Warring-
ton Office, 1198 !
Warrington. Call
NO 2-6802

RED CHINESE PROTESTERS swarmed around the
Soviet embassy in Peking yesterday chanting anti-Rus-
sian slogans.
Meanwhile, China and the Soviet Union exchanged pro-
test notes over the clash between their troops on the, Man-
churian border Sunday.
Plodding through the snow, red guards and workers
waved placards covered with demands to "hang" Soviet
Premier Alexi Kosygin and to "fry" Soviet Communist Party
t chief Leonoid I. Brezhnev. Tens of thousands of demonstra-
tors blocked the Soviet embassy shouting "Down with the
Soviet revisionists, down with American imperialism."
MRS. GOLDA MEIR was overwhelmingly endorsed
yesterday by Israel's Labor Party leadership bureau for
interim prime minister.
However, defense minister Moshe Dayan abstained.
Sources close to Dayan say he may buck the party and run
his own slate of candidates for the November elections.
The 70-year-old Mrs. Meir will announce her decision
Thursday. She is expected to accept the party's nomination.
Earlier she expressed some reluctance to become prime min-
ister because of the "awesomeness" of the office.
The endorsement marks the second setback in two days
for Dayan. The party's cabinet ministers picked Mrs. Meir
in a Vote Sunday night as their choice for interim prime
minister. Dayan abstained then also,
WALTER ULBRICHT, East German Communist
Party leader, refused West Germany's offer to negotiate
over the mounting Berlin crisis.
Ulbricht charged yesterday that West Germany had
tried to blackmail his country with an offer to call off to-
morrow's elections in West Berlin in exchange for an extend-
ed agreement for West Berliners to visit relatives in East
Berlin.
The East Germans claim that West Berlin is an inde-
pendent political entity on East German territory and con-
sequently cannot be included in West German elections.
Meanwhile, truck traffic heading toward West Germany
from West Berlin began to gather at Communist checkpoints.
At Drewitz, the main autobahn connection between West and
East Germany, trucks were stopped for more than a mile. The
pileup was attributed to tightened border controls by the
East Germans.
West German legislators were already finalizing plans
for the elections, to be decided by the 1,036 members of the
federal assembly.
THE SUPREME COURT ordered seven Southern
states to obtain federal approval for any election laws
affecting Negro voting rights.
Delivering the 7-2 decision Chief Justice Earl Warren
said stiff federal supervision was intended by the 1965 fed-
eral voting rights law.
Yesterday's ruling was aimed specifically at Alabama,
Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina, Virginia and
26 counties in North Carolina.
The court directed these states to submit changes in
registration requirements or ballot-counting procedures td
the U.S. attorney general or to the U.S. district court In
Washington, D.C.
BREATHING DIFFICULTIES plagued Berry Cannon
and the other aquanauts who made the Sealab 3 dive,
audio tapes revealed yesterday.
Cannon died shortly after the dive. The Naval Board of
Inquiry, summoned to investigate Cannon's death, was told
last week by an aquanaut that the dive should never have
been made.
The Navy said there will "almost certainly" be an in-
vestigation of what the project chief, Cmdr. J. M. Tomsky,
called instances of tampering with valves on the chambers
shortly after Cannon's death. The tampering endangered
the lives of eight aquanauts inside.
PRESIDENT NIXON has scheduled an hour-long
White House news conference for 9 p.m. tonight to discuss
his European trip and U.S. foreign policy.
Nixon, who returned to the country Sunday night, said
he sensed there was a "new trust on the part of Europeans
for the United States growing out of the fact that there are
open channels with the United States."
THE NEW DEMOCRATIC COALITION yesterday de-
manded the halt to any federal investigations that In-
volved student demonstrators' political beliefs.
The coalition, composed mainly of former supporters of
Sen. Eugene McCarthy and the late Sen. Robert Kennedy,
called for the protection of students' rights. The resolution
singled out statements by President Nixon and the Rev.
Theodore M. Hesburgh, president of Notre Dame University,
as "the most obvious example of this trend toward repres-

sion."
Hesburgh has said that student demonstrators should be
suspeided or expelled.
"We call on all Democratic congressmen," the resolution
said, "to oppose any investigation by any branch of the
government into the political beliefs of dissidents.'
a-

Im

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SUNION-LEAGUE4 >
r } President and Mrs. Fleming
INVITE You4
K- TO" AN OPEN HOUSEf
AArrrb A 1QASQ A-A P AA

Mail today to: Director of Teacher Recruitment
CHICAGO PUBLIC SCHOOLS, Room 1038
am 8 Nrth La Salle Street, Chicago, Illinois 60601
i am interested in: (Check one) 0 Elementary
Q High School (subject)
Q Special Education (area)
College
Your Mail Address _
City State Zip

I

Twenty months of civil war can take its toll in any
nation but when starvation becomes the primary
weapon of war, the result is deprivation and hu-
man suffering on an appalling scale.
MAKE BIAFRA YOUR CONCERN
MONDAY, MARCH 10, 1 TUESDAY, MARCH 11,

r

IF Y'OIT iYST HAVE...

00

OR MORE WEEKLY THIS SUMMER...
nGood Humor
OFFERS IT!

Noon
Diag Rally and

8:00, Union Ballroom

I Teach-in with

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4 1 CAMPUS

ARCH 27

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