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February 27, 1969 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1969-02-27

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, February 27, 1969

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, February 27, 1969

Petitions for
EXECUTIVE COUNCIL
Available at Student Offices
2nd floor Union
DUE MARCH 12

Attitude carries Cornell to goal

*i

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 28

7:30 P.M.

The last program in a series on
"NEGRO LIFE AND CULTURE"
"THE PSYCHOLOGY OF RACIAL NAME-
CALLING; GOOD HUMAN RELATIONS"
Speaker--MR. EUGENE McCOY, School Principal
in Battle Creek, Michigan
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
in the CURTIS ROOM,
1432 Washtenaw
Co-Sponsored b the Ecumenical Campus Center and the
Ann Arbor-Washtenaw Council of Churches

a __ .__ . w ,

By ERIC SIEGEL
Anyone who has followed Michi-
gan's mat fortunes for the past
three years quite naturally equates
Pete Cornell, wrestling and Wol-
verine success.
For those with a mind for sta-
tistics and a memory for p a s t
matches, the equation can be ex-
plained in terms of Cornell's re-
cord down through the years, al-
though he's likely to protest, "My
record isn't that good."
And such an explanation is not
a bad one either. The recollections
of a second and a third place fin-
ish in two successive Big Ten
tourneys, a third and a fifth in
two NCAA affairs, and back to
back seasons with 19-5 and 11-0-1
dual meet records are easy meas-
ures of success.
, But the formula involves some-
thing more than mere numbers,
or a by-line in a record book.
There is something reassuring
about the way Cornell handles
himself on the mat. Cool and con-
fident, one foot set in front of the
other, lanky frame bent slightly
forward, hands outstretched and
waiting to grab hold of his op-
ponent, Cornell evokes an air of
competent professionalism that
makes it easy to conclude he was
born into wrestling.
YET THIS is clearly not the
case. In fact, Cornell might have
had a football career at any one of
a number of schools, including
Michigan, where he was a part-
time defensive end on the fresh-
man team before Wolverine wrest-
ling Coach Cliff Keen suggested
he devote all his time to wrestling.
"I wrestled and played football
at Lansing's Everett High School,"
Cornell explained, "a n d even
though I thought I was a better
wrestler than a tackle, I had more
Soffers for football than for wrest-
ling."
Among Cornell's offers were full
gridiron tenders to Colorado, Wy-
oming, and Kansas.
But Cornell wanted a school that
had a good wrestling program, too.
He wrote the coach at Michigan

Pete Cornell

SGC Annune
PETITIONING FOR
SGC President & Vice President
5 Student Government Council Seats
3 Members Board in Control of
Student Publications
2 Intercollegiate Athletic
Committeemen
LS&A Senior Class President
PETITIONING Feb. 21-March 3
SGC Offices, SAB
CAMPAIGNS BEGIN MARCH 9
ELECTIONS MARCH 18-19

State, but learned that they didn't
have any more wrestling scholar-
ships for that year. Then, on a
suggestion f r o m his mother, he
wrote Coach Keen.
"I hadn't even considered Mich-
igan," remarked Cornell. "I didn't
even know it existed.
"I had to try and sell myself in
the letter," he added.
With credentials that included a
high school state wrestling cham-
pionship in the 165-pound class,
and a string of 33 consecutive vic-
tories through his senior year, the
sales pitch wasn't too difficult.
A large part of Cornell's career
at Michigan then is wrestling his-
tory. But an equally large part is
better classified under the cate-
gory "personal memories."
"I guess one of my biggest vic-
tories came in my sophomore year
against State," recollected Cornell.
"BEING FROM Lansing. the
Michigan-Michigan State match
means just a little bit more to me,"
explainednCornell. "In this par-
ticular meet, I w a s supposed to
lose to State's Mike Bradley. There
was a tremendous crowd at Yost
Field House, and we were trailing.

wait for his first win o v e r the
Spartans to have something to re-
member about h i s college days.
Two days after his first varsity
bout, he married Ann, whom he
had dated since their junior year
in high school.
"We had an away meet against
Illinois on Saturday," he recalled,
"and we didn't return until Sun-
day. I went to practice Monday
afternoon, and we were done
around 5:30 and I had to be in
Lansing at 7:30 for the wedding."
THE REST of this story reads
like part of the script of an old
Marx Brothers movie.
"I got to Lansing," he contin-
ued, "and went to the florists to
pick up the flowers. But it w a s
after six, and they were already
closed. So I drove all around town
looking for some flowers.
"The roads were real slippery,
and I skidded into a road s i d e
mailbox.
"The worst part, though, was
that there was a policeman behind
me. I explained my situation, and
he made a phone call and got me
some flowers."
Cornell arrived at the church a
few minutes late, but Ann waited
around and today they h a v e a
daughter, Amy.
"People ask me if I would have
rather had a boy, so he c o ul d
wrestle," commented Cornell, "but
you can't knock girls.
"The next one will be a boy,"
he said assuredly.
But, not to take anything away
from his athletic ability, Pete's
children might be just as well off
if they followed their mother's ex-
ample. Ann, a physical education
major, was a top gymnast her
freshman year at Michigan State.
However, not to take anything
away from Ann's character, the
younger Cornell might do well to
follow her father's leadership ex-
ample.
Cornell, elected team captain
this past year, has been in the
words of assistant Coach Rick Bay,
"a 'terrific captain, a great lead-
er,"
HIS TEAMMATES praise his
performance as team leader, too.
"Pete gives you understood en-

Cornell, in turn, praises his
coach and his teammates.
"The coaches have b e e n tre-
mendous," Cornell said. "Coach
Keen has really made us a team.
And Coach Bay has always given
us a great deal of encouragement.
I'd like to coach some day, so I
guess I really identify with Rick
(Bay)."
AND ABOUT the team: "Wrest-
ling is 90% attitude, and this team
has a fantastic attitude, better
than any team I've seen or been
on."
Cornell's own attitude has been
worthy of praise, too.
"I can't say enough for him,"
Coach Bay said deeply. "He's a
top-flight individual.
"If an athlete only has a few
medals and a letter on his jacket
to show for his participation, then
he doesn't have much.
"But if an athlete has learned
principles he can use all his life,
then he's gained something tre-
mendously valuable.
"Pete Cornell exemplifies that
type of athlete."

"I upset Bradley, and then Dave couragement," comments Geoff
Porter won his match and we won; Henson. "He doesn't have to say
the meet." much: you can just feel his sup-
But Cornell didn't even have to port."

--Daily-Sara Krulwich
PETE CORNELL, the Wolverines' 177-pound captain, rides his
Spartan adversary Jack Zindel on his way to victory in the
Michigan-Michigan State showdown earlier this year. Cornell has
been a consistent winner this season, compiling an 11-0-1 dual
meet record,

RENFREW FORMULA:
Potential precedes greatness.

By JIM BERLUCCHI
Right from the beginning Mich-
igan hockey coach Al Renfrew lets
you know the type of coach he
is. His first remark-"I'd prefer
that you feature one of the play-
ers. I like them to have the pub-
licity"-is indicative of the atti-
tude the former Michigan hockey
star has towards hockey and his
players.
Anyone who has ever watched
the team at daily practice is im-
mediately aware of the intimate
raport between the players and
their coach.
"My basic philosophy toward
coaching is to develop each in-
dividual to his greatest poten-
tial," Renfrew explained. "Win,
lose, or draw, if they play well
you don't feel too badly. You get
great teams that sometimes don't

I

RICHARD D. CRABLE
DIRECTOR OF RECRUITMENT AND PLACEMENT
for the Michigan Dept. of Civil Service
will INTERVIEW Prospective
College Graduates for Career Positions
With the State of Michigan
on

1

ON STATE STREET
IT'S
WILD'S

TAX SERVICE
725 N. University
1-5--MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY
sponsored by
STUDENTS' INTERNATIONAL CO-OPERATIVE
662=7780

MARCH 3,

1969

play up to their potential, and
poor teams who play over it. I
personally derive more satisfaction
from the latter."
RENFREW hasn't had to worry
too much about either situation.
Rather, in his last twelve years at
Michigan, he has produced win-
ning teams who also satisfy his
esthetic desires.
His greatest coaching thrill
(other than the fullfillment of his
dream to coach Michigan hockey)
was winning the NCAA champion-
ship in 1964. "It was even a great-
er thrill than winning the league
championship as a player back in
1948," he added.
Renfrew's first skating assign-
ment on the Michigan rink was
as a freshman forward from To-
ronto in 1945. Not hampered by
the ruling which presently bars
freshmen from varsity competi-
tion, he played four full years.
Captaining the NCAA defending
champions in his senior year,
Renfrew's outstanding play and]
leadership earned him a berth in
the Michigan Sport's Hall of
Fame.
STILL SHIFTY on skates, Ren-
frew recalled another of his "most
thrilling moments" which occurred
during a Michigan-Minnesota ser-'
ies. Acounting for four goals in
the 6-2 victory over the Gopher
arch-rivals, he modestly related,
"Not being a really prolific scorer,
I was especially happy with my
good fortune."
.Billboard
There will be a meeting for
anyone interested in officiating
IM volleyball Monday, March
3rd, at 7:00 p.m. in the IM
Building Moxing Room.
An intrasquad gymnastics
meet will be held at the Events
Building tonight at 7:30.
* * *
Michigan's women's basketball
teams will play teams f r o m
Michigan State tonight at the
IM Building. Game times a r e
6:30 and 7:45.

Interested in all majors.

I

11

Contact the

placement office to sign up
for interviews.

f i

i

"" mom
JM®#

I

g

Al Renfrew
Renfrew majored in physicalt
education and worked for a busi-
nees firm in Ahn Arbor after
graduation. Although no coach-
ing positions were available to him
at that time, he stayed associated
with hockey by playing for an
amateur team in Detroit.
HIS BIG break came in 1951
when, after being recommended by
Michigan coach Vic Heyliger, he
was offered the coaching position
at North Dakota. After five years
there, he accepted the coaching
post at Michigan Tech. One year
later he returned to his alma
mater as a coach.
Some of the more prominent
stars who have thrilled Michigan
hockey fans during the Renfrew
years were Gordon Wilkie (cap-
tain 1963-64), Mel Wakabayashi
(captain 1965-66)-and the in-
dominitable Gordon "Red" Be-
renson, scoring star for the St.
Louis Blues. All of these players .
also earned the League's Most
Valuable Player Award in their
respective years.
More than producing consistent-
ly winning teams, Renfrew has
earned the personal esteem and
admiration of all his players and
takes a personal interest in each
of them. He is one Michigan coach
whose record refutes the addage:
"Nice guys finish last."

ATTE

THO

I

.
r

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All classifieds advertising apartments for lease in,
the summer must be prepaid starting Monday, Febru-
ary 24.
There will be a 10 day limit on these ads, although
they can be cancelled with a pro-rated refund.
This policy is for your benefit as well as THE DAILY's.

Always Check Tice's Prices
OUR COMPLETE STOCK OF
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SWEATERIS
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1109S. University-Campus Village

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