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February 27, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-02-27

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Th rae

Thursday, February 27, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pcge"

Thursday February 27, 1969 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

.aae Th...

__

FOUR CAMPUSES QUIET
Agreements, tough policies end student protests

(CPS) - Demonstrations of
the last couple of weeks on sev-
eral campuses 'have died down
' either because students received
their demands or the university
officials put down the protests.
At the University of Chicago
last weekend, hundreds of stu-
dents ended an occupation of
the s c h o o I 's administration
building which had lasted more
4 than two weeks.
The students were protest-
ing the firing of a popular so-
ciology professor and demand-
ing that students be given 50-50
representation on committees
which make hiring and firing
decisions.
Their demonstration ended as
the university administration of-
fered to renew the contract of
Mrs. Marlene Dixon for one
year, and she refused the offer.
The self-styled "radical so-
ciologist" would not accept the
offer because it was a "token
gesture." She had been turned
down last month for perma-
nent hiring by the Sociology

Department, where she worked
half-time. The graduate Com-
mittee on Human Development,
where she spent the other half
of her time and which paid
her salary, approved her re-
hiring, but the Sociology veto
was enough to fire her.
Ninety-seven of the students
occupying the administration
building were notified by the
administration the second day
of their protest that they were
suspended from the university.
Eighteen of those students have
appeared before a faculty dis-
cipline committee. Their "sen-
tences" have ranged from sus-
pended penalties to suspension
for one quarter.
At Sir George William Univer-
sity, where students destroyed
the university's computer and
did $1.8 million damage to the
school's administration build-
ing before police drove them
out and arrested 79, officials
have instituted a hard line on

uniyersity security.
The arrested students,

who

ALL CAMPUS MIXER
%ja'tihe Cinpire
TOMORROW 9-12
South Quad
Feb. 28, March 1
THE SERVANT
DIRK BOGARDE
screenplay by Harold Pinter
3 ACADEMY AWARDS
4,

will be charged with arson, con-
spiracy and public mischief, have
been jailed awaiting preliminary
hearings. Arson alone carries
a maximum penalty of life im-
prisonment, a minimum of seven
years.
Students remaining on the Sir
George campus have been hit
with seven "emergency regula-
tions" to govern the campus.
They were told that breach of
these regulations means suspen-
sion or expulsion. They include:
-- establishment of the uni-
versity's right to check identi-
fication of anyone in a univer-
sity building, and to eject "un-
authorized" people;
--no "unauthorized person" is
to attempt to stop anyone from
access to any of the school's
facilities;
- no threats of violence to
any person;
- no disruption of activities
or events.
Biology professor Perry An-
derson, the target of racial dis-
crimination charges which
started the protest, was rein-
1stated to the faculty, but t h e
chairman of the biology depart-
ment resigned the next day to
protest Anderson's original su-
pension.
The University of Pennsyl-
vania campus returned toenorm-
al yesterday following a six-day
sit-in which ended after stu-
dents won their demands relat-
ing to the school's expansion in
ghetto areas.
The agreement reached by
the students and university
trustees provides for the fol-
lowing:
- trustees to lead a 10 mil-
lion fund raising drive for com-
munity renewal programs;
- a commission of students,
Mfaculty, trustees and community
leaders which will have the veto
power over all development
plans;
- the university annually
paying the commission's costs of
$75 thousand;
- the university replacing
any housing demolished in uni-
versity expansion.
The newly formed commission
met with Philadelphia Deputy
Major Charles Bowser yesterday
afternoon and was provided a
meeting with U.S. Housing and
Urban Development Secretary
George Romney within two
weeks.
At North Carolina A&T Uni-
versity in Greensboro, an as-
sistant professor who was one
of six teachers called "incomp-
etent" last week by students
who also called for immediate
firing of the six, has filed a
$250,000 criminal libel suit
against two student government
officers.

-Associated Press
The old and the new
Apollo astronauts Russell Schweickart and David Scott chat with Alan B. Shepard Jr., chief of the
astronaut office, and the first American to make a space flight. The two astronauts are suited up
for a practice run of the 10-day earth orbit flight they will begin Friday along with Astronaut
James McDivitt. However, mild sore throats and nasal conditions ailing all three space voyagers
may force NASA to postpone the jaunt. Dr. Charles Berry, director of medical operations for the
space agency will examine the astronauts this morning and make a recommendation on whether or
not the flight should be delayed.
TREND TOWARD APATHY:
European suspicions may
stall effective organization

the
news toda
by The Associaed Press and College Press Srrice
THE PARIS PEACE TALKS move into their sixth ses-
sion of full scale negotiations today.
Although U.S. chief delegate Henry Cabot Lodge says he
has detected "some progress being made," informed sources
say they expect some "diplomatic wrangling" at the session.
South Vietnamese Vice President Nguyen Cao Ky is likely
to make a strong protest to the North Vietnamese and Na-
tional Liberation Front over the Viet Cong's recent shelling
of cities in the South.
Ky has said he would urge his government to resume the
bombing of North Vietnam without American help should the
shellings continue.
In Vietnam yesterday, the Communist's n e w offensive
pushed to within one mile of the big U.S. air base at Bien Hoa.
U.S. intelligence officers speculated that Saigon, only 15 miles
to the south, was the goal of the drive.
" * 0
MILD ILLNESSES contracted yesterday by all three
Apollo 9 astronauts threaten a delay of Friday's scheduled
launching.
Apollo pilots James A. McDivitt, David R. Scott, and Rus-
sell L. Schweickart reported they were plagued by sore throats
and stuffed noses, and were immediately given several drugs
to curb the illness.
Space Agency officials are concerned that the stuffed
noses will develop into clogged ears, which are severely pain-
ful during rapid air pressure changes of ascent and descent.
The astronauts are scheduled to orbit the earth for ten
days during which they will make the first flight check of
the lunar module, the craft that will carry three men to the
moon's surface - reportedly by mid-July.
APPEARING BEFORE THE WEST GERMAN PARLIA-
MENT, President Nixon said the power of the Atlantic
alliance must be preserved.
In reference to future talks between the U.S. and the
Soviet Union, Nixon said "we recognize that for those nego-
tiations to succeed, it is essential that we maintain the
strength that made negotiations possible."
West Germany's leaders requested that German reunifi-,
cation be part of the agenda of any parley. However, Nixon
stopped short of such a committment.
The President and Chancellor Kurt Kiesinger discussed
in private West German misgivings about the nuclear non-
proliferation treaty, which was approved Tuesday by the
Senate Foreign Relations Committee.
THE FEDERAL RESERVE BOARD will keep a tight
rein on money this year, says chairman William McChes-
ney Martin Jr.
Appearing before the joint Senate-House Economic Com-
mittee, Martin conceded that last year's money policy had
been too loose.
He indicated that the 10 per cent surtax will slow the
economy until mid-year. However, he expressed concern that
the second half of the year would witness a rise in private
demand and inflationary overheating. "It would be foolish
to increase this risk by adding the fuel of easy credit," Mar-
tin explained.
GENERAL MOTORS IS RECALLING 4.9 million ve-
hicles suspected of having defects, the largest number in
auto history.
2.4 million cars and trucks may have exhaust systems
which leak fumes into the vehicles' interiors. The other 2.5
million cars will be checked for a faulty carburetor part which
could cause the accelerator to stick.
GM's action is the result of an investigation which was
spurred by the death by asphyxiation of four motorists last
July.
PRESIDENT NIXON has selected Rep. Roger C. B.
Morton (R-Md.) to be the new chairman of the Republi-
can National Committee.
Ray C. Bliss, chairman since 1964, resigned from the post
last week, reportedly because of indications t h a t Murray
Chotiner, a Los Angeles attorney and a former Nixon aide, was
going to be national chairman.
Morton was floor manager of the Nixon forces at the Re-
publican National Convention. Following the election, he
sought unsuccessfully for appointment as Secretary of the
Interior, a post that went instead to Alaska's Governor Walter
J. Hickel.

1 U

i

BRUSSELS (P) - Charles de
Gaulle is suspicious of the Com-
mon Market. a n d says Britain
doesn't qualify for membership.
President Nixon is for it a n d
wants Britain to become a
member.
Such views cloud the future of
Europe's moves toward unity,
but the danger seems to be less
that the Common Market will
break up than that it will turn
into a sleepy bureaucracy that
accomplishes little.
There is an ominous prece-
dent in what has happened to
Euratom, one of the, organiza-
tions making up the Common
Market. Its job is to promote
the development of nuclear en-
ergy for peaceful uses. Member
countries h ave insisted so
strongly ~, on their individual
rights and starved it of funds so
that there is doubt it can carry
on.
De Gaulle is reported to have
Second Class postage paid at Ann
Arbor, Michigan, 420 Maynard St., Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Published daily Tuesday through
Sunday morning University year. Sub-
scription rates: $9.00 by carrier, $10.00
by mail.

proposed that the market be re-
placed by a looser arrangement.
B u t many groups in Western
Europe are against trying to un-
scramble the omelette. French
farmers, for example, have got
used to seeing their surpluses
exported with the help of Com-
mon Market subsidies. West
German industrialists have pro-
fited from the abolition of tar-
iffs.
Five of the market -countries
back Nixon in urging Britain's
membership. This support, more
or less warm, comes from West
Germany, Italy, Belgium, Hol:
land and Luxembourg. They
would like to see other appli-
cants join, too: Ireland, Den-
mark, Norway, perhaps Sweden.
But De Gaulle says no, and he
has seen to it that all major de-
cisions must be unanimous.
To many, this situation makes
it less and less likely that West-
ern Europe can meet the "Amer-
ican challenge" in science and
industry. So far, French oppo-
sition has also largely frustrat-
ed efforts to get together with
Britain outside the Common
Market.
In 11 years the Common Mar-
ket has gone far toward creating
what its name implies: a vast

area like the United States
where people and g o o d s can
move freely.
But complete economic unity
is still far away. There are dif-
ferent currencies, different tax
systems and a bewildering set
of trade barriers that is some-
times more effective than tar-
iffs in stopping goods at nation-
al borders.
American officials in general
consider the market an asset to
t h e Western world's economy
and a factor in the development
of a great potential market for
the United States. On the other
hand, it has contributed to new
competition for U.S. goods, and
American officials find the mar-
ket's agricultural policy restric-
tive. Nixon sees the market, even
with its faults, as p a r t of a
strong Europe.
This v i e w seems shared by
such congressional leaders as
Rep: Hale Boggs, D-La., who has
specialized in international'trade
problems. "Congress takes a fav-
orable view of the Common
Market,"'-he said in Washington
this week. "Congress envisages it
as a unifying influence in Eur-
ope, and we feel that's good .. .
If t h e market were dissolved,
something would have to be cre-
ated to take its place."

FREE ADMISSION!
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SATURDAY, MARCH 1
Hear experts in their fields discuss migrant legal and health problems, the
social/cultural status of the ex-migrant, education and social services, the
future of farm laborers, unionizing, and the role of the churches, followed
by a film and discussion.

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A LOT GOING FOR IT!"

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NEWMAN CENTER

9:30 A.M.-4:00 P.M.

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MASS MEETING
THURSDAY, FEB. 27

"BAWDY HUMOR!"
PMOlJUT PICIURES presents auTi
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-N.Y. DAILY NEWS

HIL

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8:00 P.M.

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PRESENTING

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