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February 25, 1969 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-02-25

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page ThreA

Tuesday; February 25, 1969

WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY 4:10 P.M.
Department of Speech
Student Laboratory Theatre
presents'I
THE TYPISTS
by Murray Schis gal
February 26th & 28th Admission Free
Arena Theatre, Frieze Building
U U
I I
Thompson's PIZZA
TH IS COUPON IS GOOD FOR
---off 50c off-
ON A LARGE ONE ITEM
(OR MORE) PIZZA
Coupon is Good Only Mon., Tues., Wed., Thurs., I
February 24, 25,26, 27
ONE COUPON PER PIZZA
P w mmmm mwmm.m.m....mmmm w .mm ..mm w. .m w .... .mm..m mm mm

EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM

U.S. to
By DON KENDALL
WASHINGTON (MP)-The Nix-
on Administration's decision
to issue free food stamps to
some very poor people in two
South Carolina counties is a
turnabout from long-standing
government policy on dealing
with hunger.
Secretary of Agriculture Clif-
ford M. Harlin described the
plan as an experiment and add-
ed that the free-stamp opera-
tions in Jasper and Beaufort
counties will be watched close-
ly.
"We are looking to this spe-
cial pilot program, to give us a
real measure of the extent to
which there are needs unmet by
the regular program," Hardin
said.
But regardless of the modest
scope of the South Carolina ex-
periment, Agriculture Depart-
ment officials who administer
food programs consider the free
stamps as a major break-
through.
Until, now the department has
insisted it could not give away
food stamps under any condi-
tions. Unless the South Carolina
1l

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A

give r
project changes things, the rule
will continue.
The legal apparatus used by
Hardin to begin free-stamp dis-
tribution is a portion of the cur-
rent Agricultural Appropria-
tions Act which allows up to
$45 million from tariff collec-
tions to be used for "additional
direct distribution or other pro-
grams" without regard to
whether food programs already
exist in an area.
But the basic food-stamp low
passed by .Congress in 1964 ex-
plicitly states that "households
shall be charged such a portion
of the face value of the coupon
allotment issued to them as is
determined to be equivalent to
their normal expenditures for
food."
James E. Springfield, deputy
director of the food-stamp pro-
gram, says the interpretation
until now has been firmly that
"even a family with little in-
come spends something for
food."
However, the Agriculture De-
partment in the past year has
reduced purchase requirements
for extremely poor families so
that today under a liberalized
schedule a family of four can
pay $2 a month and receive
stamps for $52 worth of food.
Nationally, food-stamp reci-
pients in all eligible income
ranges receive an average of
$10 in coupons for $6.
The stamps are issued by the
government to certified reci-
pients in designated food-stamp

ee

food stamps

counties through agreements

with state
agencies.
In most
buy their
stamps in
ments, and
ly sales.
Families1
stamps for
cery stores

and local welfare
areas, families can
monthly quota of
two-week install-
some provide week-
then can trade the
food at retail gro-
which in turn can

TAX SERVICE
725 N. University
1-5-MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY
sponsored by
STUDENTS' INTERNATIONAL CO-OPERATIVE
662-7780

deposit the coupons in banks the
same as cash. Stamp recipients
cannot use them to buy alcoholic
beverages, tobacco or luxury
foods.
The second basic family-food
program administered by the
Agriculture Department i n-
volves direct distribution of
commodities in cooperation with
state agencies. The federal gov-
ernment packages the food and
ships it to areas within the
states.
Local officials are responsible
for determining eligibility of re-
pient families and distributing
the food to them.
The two programs are not
permitted to operate in the
same county.
Neill W. Freeman, head of the
department's commodity distri-
bution program, said 22 food
items are available for local dis-
tribution but only about 18. are
generally used.
Can a family eat properly on
either program?
The food stamps worth $58 are
not adequate to feed a family of
four, Springfield said. The de-
partment, he added, has recom-

NATIONAL SNERAL CORPORATION
H ELD OVER FOX EASTERN TEATRES
3RD WEEK FOR ILiE
375 No. MAPLE RD. "769-1300

The Theatre
Will Be Emptied
After 7:00 P.M.
Showing Fri.-Sat.

I

CINEMA II
Tues., Feb. 25
BLONDE VENUS,
Marlene Dietrich
directd by Josef Von Sternberg
7 & 9 P.M., Aud. A, Angell
75c

PARAMOUNT PICT'URES preeta
FRA1'vco ZEFFIRELUI
Pmedmodi. o
ROMEO-
eJULIET

I!

Showings
Daily
1:30
4:00
7:00
9:35

11

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mi

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Litter doesn't throv
itself away; litterr
doesn't just happen.
People cause it-and'
only people can prevent)
it. "People" means you.
Keep America Beautiful.

Ii

DON'T MISS THIS ONE
Shows at
1, 3, 5, 7, & 9:05
Feature 25 Min. Later
Student 198200624 Wast
Designated Missing ..,
PITY POUR
PATNO I E i

. Info: 662-6264
Officially h.._

mended the allowance be raised
to $27 in stamps for each indi-
vidual, meaning a total of $108
a month for a family of four.
Direct distribution of all 22
commodities would mean about
36 pounds of food a month for
each family member, said Free-
man.
The value of each full pack-
age is about $13, or around $52
for the family of four, compared
with $58 in good stamps now
available to the lowest-income
group.
The Agriculture Department
for some time has stressed that
it favors the food-stamp pro-
gram as the more efficient
method of getting food to needy
people.
Commodity distribution can
be started more rapidly in a
hunger area, officials say, but
food stamps provide a greater
variety for recipients, as well as
eliminating storage, transporta-
tion and distribution problems.
Nutritionally, the complete
22-item package offered in the
commodity program provides
100 per cent of recommended
daily allowances for essential
nutrition, including protein,
Freeman said.
However, the total package is
slightly short on vitamin A and
C, and somewhat below the total
calory recommendation.
As of Jan. 31, about 480 coun-
ties of more then 3,000 in the
country were without any type
of federal food program for
needy families, according to
Marvin M. Sandstrom, deputy
administrator of all the depart-
ment's food programs.
Some of the leading holdout
states and their number of
counties without food programs
include: Texas 106; Kansas 80;
Missouri 50; Virginia 33 coun-
ties and 18 independent cities;
Montana 30; Idaho 29; Nebras-
ka 21; Florida 16; California 15;
and Minnesota 14.
Charges hae circulated in re-
cent years that some Southern
counties opposed food programs
in predominantly Negro areas
because white officials pre-
ferred the residents migrate.
Asked about these reports,
Sandstrom said "this may have
been true in some isolated cases
in the past, but it doesn't seem
to be the case now."
Whenhasked if such an atti-
tude persists in the South Free-
man replied,. "It is n. more
pronounced than that in other
areas toward Indians, migrants
and just plain poor people."
"I would say that local re-
sistance to food programs is
more of an attitude on whether
we spend tax dollars on these
people - poor people - whoever
they are," Freeman said.
Second Class postage paid at Ann
Arbor, Michigan, 420 Maynard St., Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Published daily Tuesday through
Sunday morning University year. Sub-
scription rates: $9.00 by carrier, $10.00
by mail.
IDESLO C:ES
IDEAL FOR:

WSthe
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
U.S. AND SOUTH VIETNAMESE forces shelled known
and suspected Viet Cong and North Vietnamese positions
around Saigon to ward off troops believed to be approach-
ing the capital.
There were no new reports of Viet Cong or North Vietna-
mese ground assaults or shellings such as those that had
struck more than 200 cities, towns, and military posts since
Saturday night in the largest offensive since last year.
American officers involved in the defense of the capital
said units of four North Vietnamese infantry divisions that
pulled back into Cambodia last fall were maneuvering toward
Saigon in their spring offensive.
PRESIDENT NIXON announced yesterday that the
U.S. will resume negotiations with the Soviet Union "in
due course."
Speaking before representatives of the North Atlantic
Treaty Organization, Nixon said that he intends to "enter
into negotiations with the Soviet Union on a wide range of
issues." However, Nixon said he would talk with the Russians
only after full consultation with America's European allies.
Continuing his tour of five West European countries, Nix-
on arrived in London to confer with British leaders. Nixon
and Prime Minister Harold Wilson will probably be discussing
the Middle East and Vietnam.
* . "
IN A MESSAGE FROM EUROPE President Nixon ask-
ed Congress yesterday to head off an approaching colli-
sion between government borrowing and the legal ceiling
on the national debt.
At the same time, Nixon asked for approval of new rules
for designating which government obligations should be sub-
ject to the ceiling.
ISRAELI JETS raided two Arab guerrilla b a s e s In
Syria yesterday and battled a squadron of 10 or 12 Syrian
MIGs.
The jet dogfights developed into one of the largest Arab-
Israeli air clashes since the 1967 war.
Sources said the raid was not in retaliation for the Arab
attack on an El Al jetliner at Zurich and Friday's explosion
in a Jerusalem supermarket, but was the first act in Israel's
new policy of "active self-defense."
An army spokesman in Tel Aviv said two Syrian craft were
shot down while Israel suffered no losses. A Damascus com-
munique declared the Israelis lost three Mirage jets.
o ." .
FRANCE ACCUSED the British yesterday of revealing.
a private talk with President Charles de Gaulle and Brit-
ish Ambassador Christopher Soames to separate Paris
from its Common Market partners.
Foreign Minister Michel Debre said that the British ac-
count of the talks which suggested a French plan to scrap
the Common Market had been distorted and that De Gaulle's
European policy had not changed.
The British maintain De Gaulle proposed that Britain
and France begin talks toward replacing the present Common
Market with a loose, enlarged economic association, which
could also replace the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.
* * *
WEST GERMANY asked for tangible signs of East
German sincerity in freeing movement to East Berlin in
exchange for transferring the presidential election from
West Berlin.
West Berlin Mayor Klaus Schuetz said that a West Ger-
man decision on whether to move the March 5 election from
West Berlin inside the communist territory depended on the
kind of agreement the East Germans would make.
East Germany offered to open the Berlin Wall for Easter.
However, Guenther Diehl, spokesman for the West German
government said that the federal government expects "clear
signs of readiness to come to terms in longterm settlement of
freedom of movement in Berlin."
NORTHERN IRELAND'S Prime Minister Terence o'-
Neill suffered two major setbacks yesterday in early re-
turns from his parlimentary elections.
O'Neill was fighting to overcome a powerful rebel fac-
tion of his own pro-British unionist party. However, two rebel
leaders, Brian Faulkner and Harry West, won back t h e i r
House of Commons seats, shattering challenges by pro-
O'Neill candidates.

MARINER 6 was launched successfully yesterday on
a five month trip to photograph Mars.
The goal of the mission is to determine whether life
exists on Mars and to gather scientific data about the planet.
The unmanned spacecraft, boosted by an Atlas Centaur
rocket, is scheduled to pass within several thousand miles of
Mars on July 31.

Aedvertising contributed
for the public god

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m

.. he had x V
too much C44~ZTOp El
of a good
thing! ® -1 i GoAiR
a av PERFECT

-
Everything Has Its Advantages & Disadvantages
Its All In How You Look At It
On the advantage side, University Housing can save you valuable
time by taking care of your meals and dirty dishes, your soiled
bed linens, and the like. Facilities for your personal laundry are
close at hand. There are lounges, game rooms, TV sets, and snack
bars where you can socialize-quiet places where you can study.
There are people around with whom to do things. There are
others close by who share your interests. There are fellow poli-
ticians with whom you can work in student government. There are
others from your school or department with whom you can study
and shoot the breeze.
On the disadvantage side, make your own list .. -

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"ORIGINAL AND BRILLIANT !"
-N.Y. TIMES

Tues. & Wed. J~T RS
Tues & Ned ~'( 'y'.New York Magaine
7 , ust killed my wl
and my mother.
I know they'll get ne.
But before that ma"$.* re1
will die..
PARAMOUNT PICTURES oresents .
BORIS KARLOFF-TIM O'KELLY- NANCY HSUEH -JAMES BROWN
SANDY BARONz"P TRGO PLATTanwPETER BG ANOVICH
edanduwbyPETER GuMOVIs-yCOLOR APARAMOUNTigEASEr ily"-THURSDA
"What's New Pussycat"-"What's New Tiger Lily"--THURSDAY

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W,

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ADVENTUROUS
SERVICE MINDED
WILLING TO WORK IN THE
SOUTH THIS SUMMER
WILLING TO MAKE MONEY
DON'T BOTHER COMING
The Southerwestern Co. Education Division
Interviews Wednesday, Feb. 26
4:15 or 7:00
3532 SAB

(ENTER FOR CHINESE STUDIES

PRESENTS

PROF. JEROME COHEN
of Harvard Law School

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