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February 20, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-02-20

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

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NUCLEARPACT:
I*I
Thompson's PIZZA 7/1
THIS COUPON IS GOOD FOR ii tary
offf 50c off
w ON A LARGE ONE ITEM m idela'
(OR MORE) PIZZA
* (O MOE) PZZAWASHINGTON (I)-The Senate
Coupon is Good Only Mon., Tues., Wed., Thurs., ; Armed Services Committee, in a
* ~~~~February 17, 1 8, 19, 20*moetacul rhrdly
ONE COUPON PER PIZZA move that could further delay
O U E ZSenate approval of the nuclear
- --____ - - - ----- I rnonproliferation treaty, has an-
I-nounced plans for hearings on
GU IL HO U E imilitary aspects of the pact.
GUILD HOUSE an hn Stennis, (D-
Miss), indicated Monday the hear-
ings would start after the Senate
Fr FF o r e i g n Relations Committee
,Fri.; Feb. 21 Noon Luncheon 25cwinds up its own inquiry starting
J H WA O yesterday with Secretary of State
JO HN WATSO N William P. Rogers as the leadoff
Editor of "South End," Wayne State witness.
Uhiv. Student Newspaper Foreign Relations, which held
hearings last year on the treaty
that would ban the spread of nu-
Fri. Evening-6 P.M. clear arms, is expected to give it
I N DIA N DI N N ER prompt approval.
Guild House (at c ) But while that committee has
at 6 9tlong been'in favor of the treaty,
For reservations call 662-51 89 the move by Armed Services could
provide a forum or rallying point
- for critics unhappy with inspec-~
tion procedures and other pro-
FIALPER RMANmcvE isions.

PaneThre.

hearings
Y approval
to a'vote before Congress ad-
jiourned.
The treaty would bind nuclear
powers to keep atomic weapons
out of the hands of countries that
do not now have them, but would
permit sharing peaceful uses of
nuclear power.
It would take effect with rati-
fication by this country, Great
Britain, Russia and any 40 'ther
countries. It has been ratified to
date only by Great Britain and
six nonnuclear nations.
The other two nuclear powers,
France and Red China, have said
they will not sign.
Its backers see an immediate
advantage in holding down the
number of countries that have
nuclear weapons and a ootential
long-range advantage of an end
to the nuclear arms race,
Critics protest that inspection't
procedures are inadequate, that
this country should not forecloses
the possibility it might some day
want to provide nuclear arms to!
an ally and that a provision allow-
ing withdrawal on 90 days notice
renders the pledges involved a-
most worthless.
Stennis said the hearings would

Professional Theatre Program

F
as
con
fal
req
"ac
tre
sen

Rogers, in his first appearance
secretary before a congressional
nmittee, had the assignment of
lowing up on President Nixon's
uest of Feb. 5 that the Senate
t promptly to. consider the
aty and give its advice and con-
t to ratification

--Associated Press
MELVIN LAIRD, secretary of defense (left), listens as David
Packard, deputy secretary of defense, talks to reporters at a
Pentagon news conference yesterday. Packard said the Sentinel
antimissile system's "basic technology is in pretty good shape"
and added that the problem with it is in deployment.
ECONOMISTS' THEORY:
Black capital may
affectbusiesses

be brief.
M.Secretary of a earseoa lvin But, the Mississippi Democratr
support of the presidential re- added, "it is important that the
usto t peArmed Services Committee look atf
quest.h e treaty fr the special mill-
The Foreign Relations Comnmit- hetetyfo heseiaii

PETER SHAFE's
THE FUN BEGINS WHEN THE LIGHTS GO OUT
WED.-THURS., HILL.AUDITORIUM
FEB. 19-20 8:30 P.M.
ADVANCE SALES-PTP TICKET OFFICE
M ENDELSSOHN THEATRE

tee approved the treaty after an
initial round of testimony last
September but it was not brought
3020 Washtenaw, Ph. 434-1782
Between Ypsilanti & Ann Arbor
NOW SHOWING
Feature
Wed., Sot., Sun.
j 1:30-3:45-6:15-8:30
Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fri.
7:00-9:00
JOIN-IN THE DISNEY
FUN-IN!
f \h

tary aspect to determine what im-
pact, if any, its ratification would
have on our nuclear armaments
and our military posture vis-a-vis
the other nuclear powers."
During his presidential cam-
paign, Nixon said he favored the
goals of the treaty but 1-e op-
posed Senate ratification at that
time because of the Soviet-led in-
vasion of Czechoslovakia.
Second Class postage paid at Ann
Arbor, Michigan, 420 Maynard St., Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Published daily Tuesday through
Sunday morning University year. Sub-
scription rates: $9.00 by carrier, $10.00
by mail.

NEW YORK O'-Two econ-
omists say increased purchasing
power of blacks plus their con-
centration in major cities may
give them the strength to de-
termine the success or failure of
many inner city retail busi-
nesses.
While the nation's 23 million
blacks still earn less than whites,
steady population growth and
increased black - eiployment in
higher paying jobs are com-
bining to increase blacks' dol-
lar power.
One estimate puts the number
of blacks in the 10 largest cities
at 31 per cent of the populations
there. Julius A. Thomas, long-
time economist with the. Na-

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-Jtark %

WALT DSE
NYWi n i t eoa d t h e b lu s t ey d c rW~
Technicolor, pakL2

605 E. William 769-1593
CHRISTOPHER and SARA
Contemporary and Original Folk Music
FRI., & SAT.-FEB. 21 & 22
9:30-10:30-11 :30 $1.50
again!!
at
THIS WEEKEND
8:00 P.M.
admission: $2.00 at the door ($1.50 after 2nd set)

tional Urban League, predicts
that in a decade at least 10 ma-
jor cities will have black pop-
ulations of a million or more.
Another man who has stud-
ied the Negro market agrees.
with Thomas D. Park Gibson,
author of a soon to be published
study of black purchasing pow-
er, says black account for 25
to 30 per cent of the sales vol-
ume in major department stores
in some large cities. In Detroit,
he says, the figure is 45 per
cent.
"The black consumer could
very well decide what products
may succeed and what will fail,"
Gibson said.
Gibson said merchants are
seeking to attract blacks by ad-
vertising in black oriented'
media, using black models, em-
ploying more blacks as sales,
people and using black man-
ikians.
Howard G. Smith, Eastern ad-
vertising manager for Johnson
Publishing Co. which puts out
Ebony magazine, notes that the
black consumer's "motivations
are different to some extent, as
a result of discrimination and
segregation."
He citeshLabor Department
figures which show that for ev-
ery dollar available for con-
sumption the urban black fam-
ily spent more for food, tobacco,
alcoholic beverages, and cloth-
ing than whites. But they spent
far less, up to 50 per cent, than
whites on education, medical
care and recreation.
VOTER
REGISTRATION
INFORMATION
662-7394
MON.-THURS.
5:00 P.M.-8:00 P.M.

the
news today
1"b The A s.sociae P res, s and Col leg Press Se ic e
PRESIDENT NIXON yesterday told Congress he wants
to keep the Job Corps program for another year but to re-
move it from the antipoverty agency.
During his campaign for president, N i x o n called for
abolishing the Job Corps. But now he will delegate responsi-
bility for the Job Corps, which seeks to train school dropouts
and unskilled jobless youths, from the Office of Economic
Opportunity to the Labor Department.
Nixon also announced he is switching the Head Start
Program which provides summertime preschool classes for
'deprived children from OEO to the Department of Health,
Education and Welfare.
OEO's greatest value, Nixon said, is devising new pro-
grams and serving as an "incubator for them during their
initial experimental phases.
* . *
SEN. GEORGE McGOVERN (D-S.D.) yesterday urged
immediate federal food distribution in South Carolina.
McGovern is chairman of the Special Committee on Nu-
trition and Human Needs which is holding hearings on South
Carolina this week as part of a year-long study of the hunger
problem.
The need for immediate food shipments was supported
by Dr. E. John Lease, the head of a medical team from the
University of South Carolina who reported he found stomach'
worms in 73 per cent of black preschool children.
Lease said it might take as long as 10 years to educate
the people of the area on proper health practices but "the
food should go down in 10 days."
Another medical team reported that although "none of
the children appeared to be dying of acute starvation, there
are significant numbers who are seriously malnourished."
McGovern said he would meet with Sen. Ernest Hollings
(D-S.C.) as a first step toward arrangig a meeting with Sec-
retary of Agriculture Clifford Hardin to ask for the f o0 d
shipments.
DAVID M. KENNEDY, secretary of the treasury cau-
tioned against "attempting to stop inflation too abrupt-
ly."
Speaking before the Senate-House Economic Committee
yesterday, Kennedy said Congress must extend the 10 per
cent surcharge for another year unless fiscal 1970 federal ex-
penditures can be cut back appreciably.
The economy, Kennedy said must be placed under firm
restraint to put it on "a noninflationary path." However, Ken-
nedy believes there is a danger of unemployment rising if the
economy is "halted in its tracks."
Kennedy also answered charges that he might be involved
in a conflict of interest. He is the-former board chairman of
Continental Illinois National Ban and Trust Co. Kennedy
said he has placed bank stock in trust and plans further di-
vestiture of his holdings.
CYRUS R. VANCE, the last of former President John-
son's negotiators, left Paris yesterday.
Vance is credited with conducting the negotiations with
the North Vietnamese in Paris that led to Johnson's decision
to order a full halt in the bombing of North Vietnam and, to
the enlargement of the preliminaryt two-way talks to include
South Vietnam and the National Liberation Front.
Vance said that he believes that a Vietnam settlement
will be reached although it will require some time because of
the complexity of the situation.
ISRAEL DEMANDED yesterday that Arab govern-
ments and airlines take immediate measures to prevent
attacks along Israel's air routes.
The Israeli government also warned of possible counter-
action if there are any further attacks like the Arab guerrilla
raid on an El Al jetliner at Zurich Tuesday.
Transport Minister Moshe Carmel charged that the UN
Security Council resolution of Dec. 13 which condemned
Israel's ,raid on the Beirut airport had "encouraged such
further acts by Arab terrorists."
Carmel also said that if the Arab governments want to
keep their own ai- routes open, they must take action to safe-
guard Israel's air safety.
A PROSECUTION WITNESS testified at the Clay
Shaw trial yesterday that he heard shots fired from be-

hind a fence when President Kennedy was assassinated
in Dallas.
Richard Randolph Carr of Dallas also told of seeing three
men hurry from the Texas School Book Depository to join a,
fourth in a car parked on the wrong side of the street.
Carr was the, 43rd witness in Dist. Atty. Jim Garrison's
attempt to prove Kennedy died in a conspiratorial crossfire
involving Shaw.

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Richard Widmark Sidney Poitier
in
"THE BEDFORD INCIDENT"
The tense gripping story of the
U.S.S. Bedford, a submarine-destroyer,
when a suspected Russian sub is sighted.
Also Starring
JAMES MacARTHUR, MARTIN BALSAM and WALLY COX
THIS SATURDAY, FEB. 22 AT 8:00 P.M.
Admission-75c (Proceeds to UJA)

I

HILLEL FOUNDATION 663-4129 1429 HILL ST.

--

I

0 THE0
O ENTERTAINER
o by
John Osborne
O 0
o Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre o
o- February 19-22
o presented by 0
o Department of Speech
University Players
BOX OFFICE

AN EVOLUTION
IN FILM!
STUDENT FILM FESTIVAL

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