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February 14, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-02-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pac he

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FPnnc 1h11 c

,

Lindsay's new headache:

Snow

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14.41

SEANCE ON A WET
AFTERNOON
Kim Stanley, Richard Attenborough
Written and Directed by
BRIAN FORBES (L-shaped Room)
"A throat-drying thriller!"-LIFE
FEBRUARY 14-15

NEW YORK(R)-Mayor John
V. Lindsay caught the imagina-
tion of the nation in past hot
summers, walking the streets of
his city's slums, working to cool
simmering passions.
But some of these streets
havebeen clogged with snow
this week, and the political
winds were chill. As he toured
the storm-battered city, a wom-
an in Queens shouted at him:
"Mr. Mayor, I've been here
for 30 years and I've never seen
anything like this. Just you try
to get. elected again."
The storm is only the latest
of the blows to strike Lindsay,
but it was one more incident
damaging his political image.
And this November, New Yorkers
will vote again for a man to be
mayor for the next four years.
Lindsay, a Republican who
was talked about last year as a
presidential possibility, for 1968

or 1972, hasn't said whether
he'll run for re-election, but few
doubt that he will.
For this reason, last Sunday's
big snowfall-the worst here
since 1961-has already become
a prime political issue for the
mayor's critics, and even for
some Republicans, who have
been rushing to condemn the
city's handling of the crisis.
"The year 1969, I am sure."
Lindsay said wryly, "will be-
come a political snow job."
The critics complain that his
administration was sluggish in
reacting to the 15-inch snow-
fall, not getting the streets
cleared quickly and leaving the
city crippled far longer than
was justified.
As Lindsay toured an espe-
cially snow-clogged section yes-
terday, he stood up in the back
of an open truck at one stop.
4 Residents greeted him with a
volley of boos and shouts.
Alighting from the truck, he
walked along, looking straight
ahead, ignoring a woman shout-
ing: "You should be ashamed of
yourself. It's disgusting."
Ralph J. Bunche, United Na-

I

' - Besieged
tions undersecretary-general for
s p e c i a 1 political affairs, a
Queens resident, was critical of
the city's snow removal tactics.
"As far as getting to the United
Nations is concerned, I may as
well be in the Alps," he tele-
graphed Lindsay.

viFWt8

(Very Insidious Plarn
to Push Pizza)

HELD OVER
aQ, ra 9th WEEK.. .
Info: 662-6264
SHOWS-AT 1:00 - 3:00 - 5:00 - 7:10 &9:5

~1

Lindsay was elected mayor
after seven years in the House
of Representatives. A Republi-
can victor in the nation's most
Democratic city, he vaulted onto
the nation's stage.
On hMs first day in office, Jan.
1, 1966, Lindsay was confronted
with .a bitter, crippling tran-
sportation strike. Since then,
there have been a succession
of civic storms, the most nota-
ble the garbage strike of early
1968 and a top-level scandal in-
volving his appointed city water
commissioner, James L. Marcus,
in a bribe-kickback case.
On the plus side, he was wide-
ly credited with keeping the
Negro and Puerto Rican slums
calm during that taut summer
of 1967 with his walking tours
through the neighborhoods.
The tall, handsome, 47-year-
old mayor emerged from the
Republican, National Convention
last August as a major figure.
There was talk of drafting him
for vice president but he refused
to approve the movement and
backed Richard M. Nixon, en-
hancing his position with party
regulars.
But September followed, and
teacher strikes left the city in
emotional shreds and its mayor
the object of deep anger.
Sunday's snowfall again zpot-
lighted Lindsay's troubles in
running a city often said to be
ungovernable,. a job some think
second in difficulty to the presi-
dency.
But for all its national atten-
tion, the mayor's office in New
York historically has failed to
lift any man to the presidency.
Candidate watchers thought
Lindsay might be the one to
make it. Now, however, John
SLindsaymust decide whether ,o
run for re-election and the i esi-
dents of this city must say in
November which Lindsay they
remember, the mayor being ap-
plauded walking through the
4simmering streets or the mayor
being scolded trudging through
the snowdrifts.
Second Class postage paid at Ann
Arbor, Michigan, 420 Maynard St., Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Published daily Tuesday through
Sunday morning University year. Sub-
scription rates: $9.00 by carrier, $10.00
jby mail.
Sports Staff
Join The Daily

the
newstoa
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
MELVIN R. LAIRD, Secretary of Defense, said yester-
day the Pentagon is considering moving ABM sites away
from major U.S. population centers.
In a televised interview, Laird stressed the safety of Sen-
tinel warheads, asserting that over the past decade the United
States has stored 15,000 warheads around the world without
an accidental detonation.
Faced with growing criticism in Congress, the adminis-
tration earlier this month ordered a partial freeze on deploy-
ment work while Laird's top deputies conduct an exhaustive
re-examination of Sentinel plans. Positioning the Sentinel
systems outside heavily populated areas would pacify oppon-
ents in a number of cities being considered for the bases.
A MOTION FOR A MISTRIAL made yesterday by the
attorneys for Sirhan Sirhan was denied.
The defense had claimed that a story yesterday in the
Los Angeles Times saying Sirhan may plead guilty to the
assassination of Sen. Robert F. Kennedy might have prejud-
iced jurors. The story was picked up by local broadcast sta-
tions.
Before dismissing the motion, Superior Court Judge Her-
bert V. Walker polled the 12 jurors and 6 alternates to see if
they had read or heard the story.
Each of those who had either read or heard the reports
said his decision in the case would not be influenced as a re-
sult.
NO PROGRESS was made at the fourth formal ses-
sion of the full-scale Paris peace talks.
After the meeting, U.S. Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge
said "nothing really significant emerged. I don't expect much
'to come of these public meetings."
North Vietnamese and National Liberation Front dele-
gation chiefs told newsmen they were still demanding un-
conditional American withdrawal of troops. They also, claim-
ed the Americans must bear the responsibility for the con-
tinuation of the war.
The four delegations meet again next Thursday.
THE COMMUNIST-LED UNITED FRONT in W e s t
Bengal won a sweeping election victory yesterday over
Prime Minister Indhira Gandhi's Congress Party.
The results were a stunning blow to the Congress Party,
which dropped from the 127 seats it won in 1967 to a low of
55. West Bengal's location, close to Peking-ruled Tibet and
East Pakistan, makes it militarily vulnerable. It also contains
Calcutta, India's chief commercial port.
PAKISTANI DEMONSTRATORS became violent
yesterday on the first day of a nation-wide general
strike against the government of President Mohammed
Ayub Kahn.
The strike was called by an eight-party opposition group
the Democratic Action Committee. The group does not in-
clude the influential People's Party which gave the strike
a boost yesterday by calling on its own members to join
strike processions throughout the nation.
HOSTILE DEMONSTRATORS in at least three cities
are expected to greet President Nixon during his tour of
Europe late this month,
In London, Abhimanyu Manchanda, general secretary of
the British Vietnam Front, said marchers would mass out-
side Buckingham Palace and 10 Downing St. if Nixon sees
Queen Elizabeth and Prime Minister Harold Wilson as has
been scheduled.
Radical leftists students in West Berlin have vowed to'
disrupt the President's visit there Feb. 27. In Paris, an "ac-
tion week" for peace in Vietnam will coincide with Nixon's
visit to the French capital. ,
The trip to Europe will be Nixon's first 'foreign mission
as President.

aro
bad cops
and there
aro good
then
there's
E ~ullitt.

I

"HERE SWEETHEART, LET ME CUT THE PIZZA FOR YOU."

0

For a swinging time this evening, drop 411 Washtenaw-Ann Arbor
by Village inn where youhave a choice Piano and Banjo Entertainment
of nearly two dozen different delicious 7 Days a Week 8 P.M. 'til 1 a.m.
kinds. Chances are, you haven't tried
them all yet.. If you have, well, come Open 11 a.m. to I a.m. Weekdays
anyway. 'Til 1 :30 Fri. & Sat. Nights
ILLUAGEN
PIZZA PARLO
"Where Pizza Is Always In Good Taste"

STEVII MCCAIttN
AS TIUII'
M SU66ESTES FUR MATURE AUDIENCES TECHNICOLORMFROM WARNER BROS.-SEVEN ARTS
Next Attraction: "THREE IN THE ATTIC"

11

I

i
I

presents
JOHN MMON'D
TON ITEF!E!
and 8:00 P.M FREE EATS!!
S t. & Su. dim lighting provided
ADMISSION: $2.00 at the door ($1.50 after 2nd set)

1
_ ____

presents
THE INTERNATIONALLY CELEBRATED
tratorb
National Theatre of Canada
2 NEW PRODUCTIONS-

1

i BEN JONSON'S
classic comedy
THE ALCHEMIST
with
WILLIAM HUTT
POWYS THOMAS
BERNARD BEHRENS
Directed by JEAN GASCON

ARe erino

A New Version of
SHAKESPEARE'S
HAMLET
with
KENNFTH WFLSH

I . .. -- A

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