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February 13, 1969 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-02-13

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Pace Three

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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MARKLEY HALL
ALL-CAMPUS
MIXER
FRIDAY,
FEBRUARY 14
9.30-12:30

Corporate mail plan faces attack

WASHINGTON VP), - Post-
master General Winton M.
Blount's aim to reshape the U.S.
mail system with modern busi-
ness techniques is likely to be
welcomed by Congress.
Welcomed, that is, unless
Blount backs a plan to turn the
mails-the nation's biggest re-
tail operation-over to a self-
supporting, government-owned
postal corporation.
The corporation idea has run
into strong opposition from
postal unions and key congress-
men. But they say they favor
major reforms to speed up mail.
The 2J0,000-man letter car-
riers union says the threat of a
national strike would be its only
protection under a semi-private
corporation. It says the corpora-
tion would sweat economies out
of mail workers.
Congressional critics say a
fully self-supporting corporation
would have to charge exorbitant
mail rates.
But congressional backers say
the way to solve thebpostal sys-
tem's ills is to get it out from
under direct management by,
535 congressmen and a postmas-

ter general and turn it over to a
board of businessmen.
Blount notified Congress this
week he is studying the corpora-
tion plan-proposed last sum-
mer by President Johnson's
Kappel Commission-and alter-
native bills in Congress for
overhauling the present system.
He said he favors much of the
Kappel Commission approach
but plans to take no stand until
the study is completed
The K a p p e 1 Commission,
chaired by former AT&T execu-
tive Frederick R. Kappel, said
piecemeal, adoption of 'its re-
commendations would not do
the job and concluded a postal
corporation should be created.
B r o a d 1 y, the commission
blamed postal ills on lack of
control over operations by the
postmaster general down to the
local postiaster.
The corporation, run by a
nine-member board, would set
mail rates-subject to congres-
sional veto-sufficient to cover
operation costs. It would be au-
thorized to sell bonds for funds
to finance modernization and
equipment purchases.
Congressmen's p a t r o n a g e
. voice in nominating postmasters
would be eliminated.
Postal unions would bargain
collectively with management
for wages and benefits, with dis-
putes going to the President if
they could be settled no other
way.
But while mailmen would re-
main federal employes prohibit-
ed byJaw from striking, the let-
ter carriers union protests, they

would no longer be able to peti-
tion Congress with wage and
other grievances.
The prohibition against strikes
under such a corporation would
be upheld neither by Congress
nor by any court in the land,
said union president James H.
Rademacher.
"And if anyone tried to deny
us that right," he said, "we'd
take it anyway."
Rep. Morris K. Udall (D-Ariz),
chief sponsor of a bill to create
the postal corporation, said the
unions have enough following in
Congress that "if they strongly
oppose changes, there won't be
change,"
The letter carriers union,
however, already has endorsed

a compromise plan by Chair-
man Thaddeus J. Dulski (D-
NY), of the house postal opera-
tions subcommittee.
It would set up a Postal La-
bor-Management R e l a t i o n s
Board to provide compulsory
arbitration.
Under Dulski's plan, mail
rates would be recommended
every four years by a commis-
sion and submitted to Congress
by the president.
A Postal Modernization Au-
thority would be empowered to
raise money by selling bonds to
finance improvements.
Congressional patronage would
be replaced with a merit system
in making postmaster appoint-
ments.

the
news today
b1 1 he lrbsociat e i Press and Coliecgn Press Service

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Nigerian civil war
at military standstill

I

FEATURING
"HOUR OF THE WOLF"

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Program Informc

gHELDOVER!! 9th WEEK
ation 2-6264
"A TERRIFIC MOVIE
--just for Steve McQueen. Fast, well-acted,
written the way people talk, it is dense with
detail about the way things work.se
,McQueen embodies his special kind of aware,
existential cool--less taut and hardshell
than Bogart, less lost and adrift than
Mastroianni, a little of both!!! -N.Y. TIMES

w

LAGOS, Nigeria () - The,
Nigerians say they want to crush
the Biafran secession in East-
ern Nigeria, but the government
radio and newspapers in Lagos
often go for days without men-
tioning the fighting 350 miles
away.
' When the newspapers do refer
to the war. it often is in anxious
terms.
"On the field Nigerian mili-
tary units have been doing cred-
itably but time, it is becoming
apparent, is not on their side,'
said the independently owned
and widely circulated Daily
Times. "Every hour by which
the war is prolonged oolsrers
the rebel morale."
On the front page of the same
edition carrying that message,
the Daily Times reported that
4'

OPEN 12:45
SHOWS AT
1:00-3:00-5:00
7:10-9:20

STEVE
'MCCUEEN
AS
A SOLAR PRODUCTION

Secon
IArbor,
Arbor,
IPublic
Sunday
scriptio
bymil

nd Class postage paid at Ann
Michigan, 420 Maynard St., Ann
Michigan 48104.
fshed daily Tuesday through
morning University year. Sub-
n rates: $9.00 by carrier, $10.00
1l.

Brig. Hassan Usman Xatsina,
army chief of staff, was in Ka-
duna, 1,000 miles from the war
-playing polo, among other ac-
tivities.
Katsina and other army lead-
ers insist "everything is going
to plan."' But the army has been
almost at a standstill since Oc-
tober when the 3rd Commando
Division of Col. Benjamin A.
Adekunle seized Owerri in, cen-
tral Biafra.
"The longer we are at it, the
greater will be the temptation
for foreign countries to inter-
fere." The paper reflects a
growing fear among Nigerians
that the United States will in-
tervene on behalf of the seces-
sionists of Lt. Col. C. Odumegwu
Ojukwu.
"There seems to be a general
lack of direction," comlplains a
government-owned newspaper,
The Nigerian Observer. It add-
ed that the govern'ment "lacks
the seriousness of purpose re-
quired to prosecute the war."
The Nigerians have about
100,000 under arms, well-
equipped with weapons supplied
by the British and the Soviet
Union. They have an air force of
two dozen jet fighters and
bombers, most of which are
grounded for repairs. Against
them the Biafrans have about
40,000 trops, many of -whom
are ill-trained. They are -ot
known to have an air force, nor
do they show much defense
against planes.
POOR RICHARD'S

TODAY-2 Features Program Information 8-6416
Shows at 6:48
7:30 P.M.

I WOULD VERY MUCH
LIKE TO RECOMMEND IT!"
--Renata Adler, N.Y. Times
"DELIGHTFUL!"
-William Wolf, Cue Magazine
R RESTRICTED
: summer
IN COLOR
A CARLO PONTI PRESENTATION.

JAMES FARMER yesterday was named Assistant
Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare, by Presi-
dent Nixon.
The former national director of the Congress of Racial
Equality (CORE) supported Hubert Humphrey for President
last fall, r
However, Farmer indicated yesterday he would accept
the post in the Nixon administration, because it would give
him the opportunity to "get inside and try to influence the
course of events." According to HEW secretary Robert Finch,
Farmer will have "a powerful voice" in planning a reorganiza-
tion of the department.
THE PARIS PEACE TALKS move into their fourth.
full-scale session today.
The National Liberation Front and North Vietnamese
delegations reportedly are preparing several hard-line state-
ments. Observers indicate these statements probably will re
iterate Hanoi's stance that the U.S. unconditionally accept all
North Vietnamese demands.
Underlying the present stalemate is the absence of the
top North Vietnamese and South Vietnamese representatives.
Le Duc Tho, a high ranking North Vietnamese politburo mem-
ber is in Hanoi, possibly for a briefing on domestic problems
that may have been aroused by the Paris talks. Articles in
the official Hanoi press have hinted at public impatience in
North Vietnam for an end to wartime hardships.
THE CUBAN GOVERNMENT has agreed to speed up
the return of passengers aboard hijacked U.S. planes.
Havana will allow the passengers to leave Cuba on the
hijacked craft provided the government, the airline compan-
ies and the pilot agree it is safe, and accept the responsibil-
ity.
Previously, Cuba has permitted the hijacked planes to be
flown back with only the crew aboard. The passengers were
forced to wait, often overnight, for a chartered plane.
ISRAELI PILOTS yesterday shot down a Syrian plane
during a skirmish near the Golan Heights cease-fire line.
Both Israel and Syria charged that the other had vio-
lated its air space. The Syrians claimed that the jet was on a
training flight near the cease-fire line when Israeli planes .
surprised the fighters from behind and engaged them in air
battle.
" 0 *
REPUBLICANS IN CONGRESS will attempt to reduce
former President Johnson's proposed budget, says House
GOP leader Gerald Ford of Michigan.
Ford said the. reductions will attempt to offset auto-
matic spending increases. The GOP plan is to seek "a total
reduction below what the Johnson administration antici-
pated," he added.
Johnson had- proposed a spending program of $195.3
billion, an increase of $11.6 billion, for the next fiscal year.
SIRHAN BISHARA SIRHAN is considering pleading
guilty to the charge that he murdered Sen. Robert F.
Kennedy.
nThroughout his trial, Sirhan has maintained a plea of
innocent to the charge of premeditated murder. However,
the defense'has said he does not deny that he shot the New
York senator June 5, 1968.
Sirhan, a native of Jordan, is said to have been inflamed
by public statements by Kennedy in which the senator ap-
peared sympathetic to Israel.
I. ,.W. ABEL, president of the United Steelworkers
Union, was re-elected yesterday.
Abel beat back a challenge from Emil Narick, a union
lawyer, for control of the third largest unionin the U.S.
An Associated Press survey gave Abel a margin of 70,000
votes over his opponent. During the campaign Narick claimed
that many steel workers were dissatisfied with last year's
contract settlement, the largest ever negotiated.

097)E EPTVAUCE-N
JACQUELINE BISSET -DON GORDON- ROBERT DUVALL- SIMON OAKLAND- NORMAN FELL
Sreenptay byALAN R TRUSTMAN and HARRY lt.ENER. Based on the novelMuteWitness'byRobert LPrke-.Executive Producer ROBERT E REtYEA" Produced byPHLIP ANTONIfDlirected by PETER YATES
' ytnJoSchifan MSUGGESTED FOR MATURE AUDIENCES TECHNICOLOR*FROM WARNER BROS.-SEVEN ARTS m W

331 THOMPSO
NEWMAN BASEM
REOPENING OF
BEST FOOD, BEST PR
IN ANN ARBOR
1/3 lb. chuckburger...
Homemade chili......
Charcoal grilled hot dog.
Roast beef sandwich.
Ham sandwich .........
Tuna sandwich.......
Egg salad sandwich
Potato salad, cole slaw ..

ICES
45c
30c
...30c
45c
..40c
..35c
25c
....20o

N
BENT

F

a

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CO-FEATURE
Roman Polanski's "REPULSION"

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Next: "A Man for All Seasons" & "Taming of the Shrew"

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ANN ARBOR PREMIERE THURSDAY

Desserts 25c, Drinks T Oc
Daily specials featuring'
Chinese food 80c-$1.00

presents

UI

THE INTERNATIONALLY CELEBRATED
Z tratorb
National Theatre of Canada
2 NEW PRODUCTIONS-

BEN JONSON'S
classic comedy
THE ALCHEMIST
with
WILLIAM HUTT.
POWYS THOMAS
BERNARD BEHRENS
Directed by',JEAN GASCON

or

"PALACE OF PLEASURE"
A SENSUAL SPACE ODYSSEY FEATURING THE VOICE
AND POETRY OF LEONARD CO.HEN
"Contains some of the most beautiful color sequences ever
filmed..,. it abundantly demonstrates that split-screen techniques
can be used for something more artistic than a "Chelsea Girls."
-Chicago Tribune
also on the same program:
"LAPIS" by James Whitney, winner of innumerable awards, the
most highly acclaimed psychedelic film ever made, music by
Ravi Shanker. W. C. FIELDS in "The Dentist" LAUREL AND
HARDY in "Two Tars," silent-classic featuring fast cars and fast
women with a great comic destruction scene. Also Betty Boop
cartoon and Gene Autrey, "America's Singing Cowboy," in a
stoned science fiction serial, "Phantom Empire."

A New Version of

A New Version of
SHAKESPEARE'S
HMmLET
with
KENNETH WELSH

benefit for

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