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February 12, 1969 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-02-12

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Page Three

Wednesday, February 12, 1969

I HE MICHIGAN DAILY

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PEACE KEEPING

CONTROVERSY '69

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Interviews for the.
Chairman of
CONTROVERSY '69

UN:H
UNITED. NATIONS, N.Y. -
Soon after the United Nations
was born it became clear that
the heralded peacemaker could
stop wars only when the super-
powers wanted them stopped.
Today, stalemated in the
Middle East and reduced to a
spectator's role in Vietnam and
Czechoslovakia, the UN peace
potential has hit a new low.
The United Nations was
launched 24 years ago on a
wave of lofty pronouncements
that brought new hope to war-
weary millions around the
world.
Before a year had passed,
however, the Soviet Union had

Successes

and

Sign-up for an interview and pick-up a4
short form in the Michigan League, 3rd
floor UAC Offices by Thursday, Feb. 13.
HELD OVER
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Shows at 1 :00-3:00
Info: 662-6264 5:00,17:10 & 9:15.

begun casting vetoes in the Sec-
urity Council and the cold war
had sent in.
In the years that followed,
scores of warsrerupted around
the world, from Baghdad to
Biafra, and many went un-
checked.
Usually the United Nations
looked the other way or issued
vague pronouncement§ while
the fighting raged on. It served
as an instrument for peace only
in rare cases when the United
States and the Soviet Union
both found it advantageous to
call off the shooting.
In two cases, the United Na-
tions succeeded in taking police
LAST TIMES
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action that the Communists did
not want-in Korea and the
Congo. In both cases, the Rus-
sians were caught off guard.
Vietnam was a classic exam-
ple of UN impotence. In 1966,
the United States tried to bring
the war before the Security
Council. Senate Majority Leader
Mike Mansfield charged that
the United Nations had "yet to
face up to the responsibilities"
posed by Vietnam.
The United States submitted
a resolution asking for a new
Geneva conference to decide the
destiny of Vietnam. Russia, with
French support, retorted that
the United Nationsrhadno right
4 to consider the issue, a view-
point shared by Hanoi.
Secretary-General U Thant,
who tried for years to make
some headway toward settling
the SoutheastAsian dispute, fi-
nally admitted that Vietnam
was a cold war conflict. He said
it was futile to hope that the
United Nations could overawe a
nuclear power..
Because of a Soviet veto, the
United Nations was unable to
stop the 1948-49 Berlin blockade
that threatened an East-West
confrontation.
The lingering civil war in
Nigeria attracted little notice in
the glass house beside the East
River.
When Red China swallowed
up Tibet in 1959, El Salvador
called on the peace organization
to take action. The ensuing si-
lence said louder than any words
Fthat the United Nations could
do nothing.
The United Nations had its
finest hour as peacemaker in
1950 when the Russians boycot-
ted the Security Council just
when the Communists in the
Far East attacked South Korea.
The result was the only major
war ever fought under the UN
banner, with the United States
supplying the men and the Unit-
ed. Nations largely loaning its
name.
A rare act of cooperation by
the United States and the Soviet
Union enabled the United Na-
tions to halt the Suez war of
1956.
It began as a fight between
two Middle East powers when
Israel invaded Suez, but took on
major proportions when Britain

iilures
and France joined the Israelis.
When the United States intro-
duced a resolution in the Securi-
ty Council calling on all parties
to stop fighting, Britain and
France angrily vetoed it.
The council stood paralyzed
until the Soviet Union supported
the Americans in backing a res-
olution invoking the famed
Uniting for Peace resolution
that threw the crisis into the
General Assembly. As a result,
Britain and France pulled back -
their forces.
The United Nations succeeded
in halting the Indian-Pakistani
clash over the princely state of
Kashmir in 1965 because Russia
and the United States both
wanted the shooting stopped.
The United Nations, with a

Ex
S1

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FOR VILLAGE
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X001 Eff i m i ATuRI AUDIENCES . TECHNICOOR , ROM WARNER BROS.-SE WitARTS IE

"DAZZLING! once you see it, you'll never again picture
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I I

U Thant
3.500-man peace force on Cy-
prus, has prevented an explo-
sion between Greek and Turkish
Cypriot forces on that volatile
island. Both Russia and the
United States prefer peace in
that part of the Mediterranean.
In June, 1967, when war broke
out between Israel and the Arab
states, the Security Council
went into emergency session.
But it was still talking fruitless-
ly when the yar ended.
. In a thrust at both Vietnam
and Czechoslovakia, Thant re-
cently deplored what he called
the strong arm methods of the
big powers to settle internation-
al problems.
"If this trend is not reversed,,
and if the principle of noninter-
vention in the free destiny of
nations is not re-established,"
warned Thant, "the future of
international peace and security
itself is indeed a very dark one,"

I

DIAL
5-6290

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Shows At
1 -3-5-7-9

"D@Ply moving film! -ArcherWinston, N.Y.Post
edfinitely one to s8el"-AnnGuarino, N.Y.Daily News
"Explosive,revealing drama brought
to the screen with extraordinary skill!"
-WMliam Wolf, Cue
"Brims with laughter and tears!"-Newsdiay
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer presents
in Frank D. Gilroy's Pulitzer Prize winning

I

Second Class postage paid at Ann
Arbor, Michigan, 420 Maynard St., Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Published daily Tuesday through
Sunday morning University year. Sub-
scription rates: $9.00 by carrier, $10.00
by mail.

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
ISRAELI PILOTS dropped flaming napalm on Jor-
danian troops in a fight yesterday in the desert near the
southern end of the Dead Sea.
-- A 20-minute raid by eight fighters and two helicopters
backed up Israeli ground forces. Four Jordanian soldiers were
killed and six wounded.
The action came after a series of minor skirmishes In
which neither side had reported casualties.
Israeli sources charged Jordanian machine-gun and mor-
tar crews started the fighting Monday night.
9 * *
PRESIDENT I. W. ABEL of the United Steelworkers
and challenger Emil Narick both claimed victory yester-
day as steelworkers across the country voted for a new
union leader for the next four .years.
IP Abel loses the election there is some indication that
the union may leave the AFL-CIO.
Narick has promised that if he should win, he will "re-
examine the union's ties with the AFL-CIO." He is reported
to be a supporter of Walter Reuther who pulled the United
Auto Workers from the AFL-CIO last year. Throughout Nar-
ick's campaign he has praised Reuther's leadership, contend-
ing the autoworkers have shown superior bargaining power
to the steelworkers.
MEMBERS OF THE U.S. DELEGATION to the Viet-
nam peace talks are studying a group of articles in the
official Hanoi press hinting at public impatience In North
Vietnam for an end to wartime hostilities.
The tone of the articles suggests that public knoedge
that peace talks are in progress has generated an eagerness
for an end to a state of war which has lasted over a quarter-
century.
Terms of the articles are obscure enough to prevent draw-
ing solid conclusions, but some people are inclined to look on
them as demonstrating that there are pressures working in
Hanoi for some movement toward peace.
f . .
THE HOUSE HEARINGS on tax reform's first witness
has tentatively been designated as Rep. Wright Patman
(D-Tex.), who has investigated tax-exempt foundations
for eight years.
The tax-writing committee has listed for specific con-
sideration recommendations made by the Treasury f o u r
years ago limiting the activities which foundations can en-
gage in while still retaining the privilege of not paying taxes
and of enabling donors to, deduct their contributions.
Besides being concerned w I t h small foundations, the
committee will deal with the growth of the larger foundations
into capital concentrations with a significant degree of con-
trol over the national economy.
Patman, chairman of the House Banking Committee, and
of a small business subcommittee on foundations, is especially
interested in this aspect of foundation management.
The Ways and Means Committee's decision to put foun-
dations first on its list for study accompanies other indications
of official concern over concentrations of economic power.
. . .
CANADA'S MOVE toward 01plomatic recognition of
Red China has caused m u c h concern for the United
States.
State Department spokesman Robert J. McCloskey gave
this response yesterday upon the announcement that Canaa
is proposing talks with the Peking regime about establishing
diplomatic relations.
The U.S. has long opposed recognition of Red China as
long as the Peking regime holds to a militant international
policy.
MCloskey went on to say, "the U.S. is also concerned
about the position of the Republic of Nationalist China which
is a cooperative member of the international community and
with which the government of Canada maintains diplomatic
relations."
"* 0 .
A LEADER of Sen. Eugene J. McCarthy's presiden-
tial campaign reported yesterday "a significant degree of
resentment" among McCarthy backers over the makeup
of two Democratic party reform commissions.
Sen. George S. McGovern (D-S.D.) heads one commission
which will strive to make the delegate selection procedure
more democratic.
The other group, assigned to rewrite the rules for the

1972 convention is headed by Rep. James G. O'Hara (D-Mich.)
Curtis B. Gans, past director of McCarthy's operations,
noted that on McGovern's commission there is not one per-
son who supported McCarthy before the assassination of Rob-
ert Kennedy.
PERRY RAYMOND RUSSO, prosecution witness, test-
fied yesterday that he told a police sergeant in 1967 that
he could not, truthfully say whether Clay Shaw was one
of the trio he said he heard in 1963 plotting President
John Kennedy's assassination.
Russo's testimony at a 1967 preliminary hearing has been
the core of Dist. Att. Jim Garrison's conspiracy investigation.
Russo had testified then and again at Shaw's trial this week,
that he heard Shaw, Lee Harvey Oswald, and David W. Ferrie
plotting to kill Kennedy.
However, Russo said yesterday he had never heard Shaw,
Oswald, or Ferrie actually "agree" or make a pact to kill Ken-
nedy. He said also he did not consider the assassination talk
important enough to report ft to authorities.
The Case for Community Control of Schools
hear RHODY McCOY
Embattled administrator of
OceanHill-Brownsville
experimental school district
in Brooklyn, N.Y.
FEBRUARY 19-8:00 P.M.

THE

IBACH

CLUB

Presents
DR. RICHARD CRAWFORD
speakzing on
STRAVINSKY'S "Oedipus Rex"
jelly doughnuts and fun afterwards

Suggested for
GENERAL
audiences
Jack Albertson Martin Sheen
fcrenpayby produced by directed by
Frank D.Gflroy Edgar Lansbury Ulu Grosbard
H'eat Judy Collins sing -Albatross" and rerelr' G
S Knows Where The TimeGo" Metrocolor
ro essional Theatre Program

Thursday, Feb. 13

8:00 P.M.

NOTICE!!! THE THEATRE WILL BE
CLEARED AFTER THE 7:00 P.M.
SHOWING FRIDAY & SATURDAY EVENING

GUILD HOUSE-802 Monroe
For Further Information Call
769-0995 or 763-1614
EVERYONE WELCOME!
No heed to know anything about music to come

I

"VISCOUNT HAS MADE A BEAUTIFUL, DISCREET, PERCEPTIVE
FILM OF THIS EPOCHAL WORK OF THE 20TH-CENTURY
WORLD ... FILM ACTING AT ITS PUREST ...
THIS IS THE EXRESSION, THROUGH THEIR ART, BY
SOME FINE FILM ARTISTS OF THEIR SYMPATHY AND
LOVE FOR CAMUS' GREAT BOOK."
-Stanley Kauffman, The New Republic

O

IPETER SHf4 ER
B6r

- 4
STARTS TOMORROW---7:00-9:00
"A testament to Jean Seberg's
ineffable eroticism"
-AndrewSarris, Village Voice
.. .......- m .... ..

-- -'N' - --
U - ~ ~ ~ -

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