100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 11, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-02-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Tuesday, February 11, 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, February 11, 1 96~ THE MICHIGAN DAiLY

Ill l

A free, film series on r
THE RELIGIONS OF MAN
A National Educational Television Film series prepared under the directionj
of HUSTON SMITH, Professor of Philosophy, M.I.T., author of RELIGIONS
OF MAN (available in paperback)

SUPPORT WANING:

1111

;; h
A

FEB. 1 1-FEB. 16
Buddhism: Part 3

FEB. 18-23
Confucianism
Taoism

m1

The above listed films will be shown at the following places and tim

E.
k
i
1
3{
4
bi-
{}t3
1

Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Sunday

7:00 South Quad Lounge
3:30 Newman Center, 331 Thompson St.
7:30 Multipurpose Rm., UGLI
7:30 Ecumenical Center, 921 Church St.
5:45 Y.M.C.A., corner 4th Ave. and William

?f
1 f
k
nes;
i I
1{{
k
L

Protest
-to del1a,
WASHINGTON (P) - Widen-
ing public protests against the
Sentinel anti-missile system ap-
parently were significant in the
Nixon administration's decision
to hold up work and take an-
other look at the project. ,
The protests, centering in a
half dozen metropolitan areas
chosen for anti-missile installa-
tions, have resulted in a surge
of letters to congressmen and
senators.
Critical mail reaching the
Pentagon, some refered by the
White House, also reflects con-
cern of people living elsewhere
in the country.,
The letters express worry
about the growth of nuclear
weapons and any possible nega-
tive effect the U.S. anti-missile
system would have on arms con-
trol talks with Soviet Union.
The rising public objections
are credited with winning some
recruits to a Senate group which

force Nixon

ARM

OFFICE OF RELIGIOUS AFFAIRS, 2282 SAB

last year failed in a series of
legislative efforts to block funds
for the Sentinel. They hope to
succeed this year.
Even some previously ui-
swerving supporters of the Sen-
tinel, such as Chairman L. Men-
del Rivers of the House Armed
Services Committee, are show-
ing signs of uncertainty,
Rivers has postponed his com-
mittee's consideration of pro-
posed anti-missile sites until the
administration makes up its
mind.
A Pentagon analysis of edito-
rial reaction concluded that a
significant number of newspa-
pers which previously supported
the Sentinel program began late
last year to advance reasons fcr
delay.
The analysis, prepared last
month, said "the actual selection
of Sentinel sites near several
large cities in late 1968 in-
creased the demands for further
public discussion."

7 1

kt.

9

(Very Insidizzs Plan
to Push Pizza)

09

DIAL
5,6290

G.C1INI~

Shows At
1-3-5-7-9

;

I

"Deeply moving film "-ArcherWinsten, N.Y. Post
"Definitely one to see!"-Ann GuarinoN.Y. Daily News
"Explosive, revealing drama brought
to the screen with extraordinary skill!"
-William Wolf, Cue
"Brims with laughter and tears!"-Newsday
Metro.Goldwyn-Mayer presents
Poec4 (
In Frank D. Gilroy's Pulitzer Prize winning

sys tern
Army officials said the major
protest movement started last
mid-November in Chicago, pro-
posed site for a Sentinel base,j
led by a group of nucelar physi-
cists.
Other opposition nas arisen ;n
Detroit, Seattle, Wash., Boston,
Los Angeles, San Francisco- and
the New York area, Army offi-
cials said.
They did not suggest that
there was anylinkup, and noted
that concerns varied.
Basically, scientists who have
led the opposition in Chicago
and Detroit have concentrated
their attack on two main points:
-That the presence off the
Sentinel system's Spartan mi.-
sile would present a potential
danger of accidental nuclear ex-
plosion of its warhead, packing
the explosive equivalent of a
million pounds of TNT.
-That the presence of anti-
missile complexes would actual-
ly increase the dangers to a city
. by making it a military target
for enemy missiles.
Army authorities counter that
there is no danger of an acci-
dental atomic explosion.
Dr. John S. Foster, the Penta-
gon's research and engineering
chief in the Johnson and now
the Nixon administration, trav-
eled to Chicago late last year in
an effort to reassure critics. He
failed.
Army authorities argue that
the Sentinel is deployed to pro-
tect critical areas and that rn-
portant production centers like
Chicago and Detroit undoubted-
ly already are prime targets on
the attack list of potential ene-
mies.
These officials contend the
real motive of the scientist lead-
ers of the organized protests
is grounded in their general op-
position to nuclear weapons and
their fear of a new arms race
with Russia.
According to Pentagon au-
thorities, objections in the Seat-
tle area come largely from con-
servationists. They say that real
estate issues are involved in
protests in the Los Angeles and
San Francisco areas.
In late January, residents of a
Boston suburb bombarded an
Army engineer general with
hostile questions when he 'nred
to explain some of the construc-
tion facets affecting the com-
munity.
The Boston area site was the
only one on which construction
actually started. The Nixon ad-
ministration review nas balted
the digging.

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
THE BIG THREE WESTERN ALLIES reminded the
Russians they are responsible for maintaining free ac-
cess to.Berlin.
The United States, Britain and France said in a joint
statement yesterday there is no justification for the East
Germans to block the West German presidential election in
Berlin by clamping down on surface traffic.
East Germany announced Sunday that members of the
Federal Assembly, which is to meet March 5 in Berlin to
choose a successor to President Heinrich Luebke, will be bar-
red from access routes to Berlin from Feb. 15 until further
notice.
The Bonn government said it sees no cause for a change
in the elections since the delegates can fly to Berlin through
the air corridors controlled*by the Western Allies.
President Nixon will go ahead with plans to visit Berlin
on his European trip despite East Germany's plans to impose
travel restrictions during the West German presidential elec-
tions.
The Florida White House said yesterday that Nixon fully
supports the.Allies' declaration that the restrictions are un-
justified.
Nixon will be visiting Berlin during the time the restric-
tions are in effect, but he will be flying in to the city.
0* " 0
ISRAEL'S COALITION GOVERNMENT was shaken
yesterday by reports that Prime Minister Levi Eshkol does
not want to keep populated areas of Jordan captured in
1967.
Eshkol .reportedly said in interview that Israel "does not
seek any part of the settled area of Jordan's west bank."
The right wing Free Center party put forward a motion
of no confidence which will be debated in the Knesset today.
The rightist Gahal party, which represents about one
quarter of the electorate demanded Eshkol to verify if the
statement was accurate.
Eshkol's office said that the statement was not in the
copy of the interview they had, but did not deny that Eshkol
made the remark.
HANOI'S highest ranking representative at the Paris
peace talks flew home yesterday amid speculation that he
was carrying secret American proposals.
Le Duc Tho said before he left that the visits were "rou-
tine."
Political observers noted that each time Tho has returned
to Hanoi there have been shifts in Hanoi's stands.
His departure follows confirmation last Week that North
Vietnam and the U.S. are in secret contact outside the frame-
work of the conference.
IN VIETNAM indications are that the Communist
command is preparing to start its long delayed winter-
spring offensive.
U.S. intelligence reports disclosed the Viet Cong's 5th
Division is moving from its Cambodian border base towards
Saigon. Its vanguard is reported only 30 miles away from the
South Vietnamese capital.
Allied commanders .are mounting battalion-sized opera-
tions in every area that shows a chance of- military conflict
and are maintaining a full alert over the Tet lunar new year
holidays next week.

I

'SO ALRIGHT ALREADY.
I FORGOT TO CALL IN THE PIZZA ORDERS."'

Pizza to go is a national pasttime ...
and Village Inn Pizza is always hot and
ready when, you eat it because it comes
wrappedin foil.Why not call right now?

3411 Washtenaw-Ann Arbor
Piano and Banjo Entertainment
7 Days a Week 8 p.m. 'til 1 a.m.,
Open 11 a.m. to 1 a m. Weekdays
'Til 1 :30 Fri. & Sot. Nights

Suggested for
GENERAL
audiences
co-starn"
Jack Albertson -Martin Sheen
screenplay byproduced by directed by
Frank D.Gilroy Edgar Lansbury Ulu Grosbard
Hear Judy Collins singAlbaross andMetroolr MGM
rWho Knows Where The Time Goes?~ ' ,"-
L _ _ -_ - - -----~----~ -i

44
PIZZA PARLOR
"Where Pizza Is Always In Good Taste"

i

I

GO
MAIZE

Maeirm W ftjtt iu;l

I1

Iw-

-II

em

. 0
econd iClass potae paid at AnIN THAILAND'S 'first national elections in a decade,
Arbor, Michigan. 420 Maynard St., Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104. early returns show the government's party suffering a de-
Published daily Tuesday through feat in Bangkok.
scription rates: $.00 by carrier, $10.00 The United Thai People's party was expected to take'
by mail, about 60 per cent of the seats in the lower house of parlia-
ment.
Prime Minister Thanon Kittikachorn's military regime'
was not directly involved in the balloting, but the vote was
seen as a gauge of its popularity.
REI

NO

MOI

presents

IMAn A

THE INTERNATIONALLY CELEBRATED
a rafrrb
National Theatre of Canada
2 NEW PRODUCTIONS-

VWNK m
SEN. WAYNE MORSE

CONTROVERSY '69

Union Ballroom

Sun., Feb. 16

2 P.M.

I

I

I

Interviews for the
Chairman of
CONTROVERSY '69

Admission $1.00 Tickets will be available starting Tomorrow
at the Union and League Desks
SYMPOSIUM '69 contemporary
discussions

BEN JONSON'S
classic comedy
THE ALCHEMIST
-- with
WILLIAM HUTT
POWYS THOMAS
BERNARD BEHRENS
Directed by JEAN GASCON

Sign-up for an interview and pick-upct
short form in the Michigcin League, 3rd
floor UAC Offices by Thursday, Feb. 13

i

I

PHILIP KAPLEAU, Resident Teacher
Zen Meditation Center of Rochester
February 12 through February 14

I

11

BUDDHISM-FILM
LECTURE
DISCUSSION

I

A New Version of
SHAKESPEARE'S

ZASEN

Wednesday, 7:30 P.M.
Multipurpose Room
Undergrad Library
Thursday, 9:00 A.M.
Residential College
Greene Lounge
Thursday, 3:00 P.M.
Residential College
Fr4v. O9:00AAM

TONIGHT
THE WOMEN
Directed by George Cukor, 1939
The second film in Cinema Guild's Festival Week of
'30's Films. Clare Booth Luce's venomous, bitchy
comedy with an all female casf-of the biggest stars
of the day.
kIMnDAA D f A ItI N

HAMLET I
with
:v 'FNNFTH-PwFI CL_

OPEN SEMINAR

I

7ASE

11

AL n%,i* * ----1 - w " ''s:.:.:x-:':v_

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan