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February 07, 1969 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-02-07

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ree

Friday, February 7, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Thr

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ii

SYMPOSIUM
INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS

'69

UNITED NATIONS
Voice for Third world

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service

x
,..

FEB. 13
Union Ballroom
10 p.m.-Dawn
Admission free

LOVE, SEX and RELATIONSHIPS
A teach-in conducted by
Robert Rimmer, author of
"The Harrad Experiment"

Feb. 1 6 SEN. WAYNE MORSE
Union Ballroom
2 P.M. $1.00'
Feb. 19 & 20 GENESIS I'
League Ball room An underground film festival
7 P.M. and 9:30 P.M.
$1.50

UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. (I')-
Voting patterns in the General
Assembly demonstrate that the
the United States no longer
enjoys the "mechanical major-
ity" it once had in the United
Nations.
This is one of the significant
effects of the power shift that
has taken place in the world or-
kanization as a result of the
surge of new members from
Africa and Asia.
A detailed analysis of voting
on 37 controversial questions in'
the recent assembly shows the
United States on the losing side
on 21-more than half the time.
On the same issues, the So-
viet United voted with the losers
Ionly, 13 times.
The main reason 'for the U.S.
showing was the fact that the
assembly's agenda-at is usual-
ly is these days-was heavy
with colonial questions and is-
sues involving the economic
Ihave-nots.
It was a case of the Soviet
bloc teaming up with the Asian
and African countries, and
sometimes the Latin Americans.
This coalition, of course, is not
possible on East-West contro-
versies.
In the recent assembly the
United States still could put to-
gether a winning bloc on such
issues as the seating of Red
Second Class postage paid at Ann
Arbor, Michigan, 420 Maynard St., Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Published daily Tuesday , through
Sunday morning University year. Sub-
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China and Korean reunification.
It was even able by intensive
lobbying to defeat an Asian-
African move to suspend South
Africa from the UN Conference
on Trade and Development.
Without joining the Soviet
bloc, the Asian-African bloc
cannot muster a two-thirds
mIajority but it can exercise a
sort of veto by preventing oppo-
nents from getting two-thirds.
Because of this potential
."veto" and the unwieldy char-
acter of a body with 126 mem-
bers, the big powers have quiet-
ly turned to procedures outside
the assembly. These include:
-Bilateral negotiations by the
United States and the Soviet
Union such as those which re-
sulted in the partial ban on nu-
clear tests, the treaty banriing
the spread of nuclear weapons
and the outer space treaties.
-Greater reliance on the 15-
nation Security Council. This
represents a reversal of U.S.
thinking and to some extent of
the Soviet attitude.
In 1950 the United States
pushed through its Uniting for
Peace plan which sought to shift
a big part of the UN peace-
keeping burden to the assembly.
At that time, the council' was
virtualy paralyzed by Soviet
vetoes and the assembly was
strongly pro-Western. It had
only 60 members.
The council now has returned
to something like the place it
held in the UN's first years. It
held 171 meetings in 1948, for
example, but had five in 1959.
Last year it had 76, even
though the new practices of

skipping consecutive interpreta-
tion and of concentrating more
on preparatory negotations have
reduced the number of meet-
ings required to reach decisions.
One thing that made possible
the shift back to the Security
Council was a change in the So-
viet attitude toward the veto.
The Russians now use the veto
much more sparingly, often ex-
pressing their opposition by ab-
staining. -
In the past five years, there
have been only four Soviet
vetoes in 1946-64. In 1955 alone,
the Russians cast 18 vetoes.
The 1965 expansion of the
council from 11 to 15 members
guaranteed the Asians and Afri-
cans halfethe 10 nonpermanent
seats. They hold the balance of
power, and can join with any
four other members to get the
nine votes needed to' approve
a resolution and, with any two
to block a decision.
Because of this situation, the
trend in the council has been
toward agreed solutions rather
than confrontations.
Many of the council's major
actions in recent months have
been taken either by unanimous
vote on resolutions worked out
in the back rooms or by simply
having the council president
state the consensus of dele-
gates without formal vote.
An important instance of this
was the resolution on the Mid-
dle East that the council adopt-
ed unanimously Nov. 22, 1967,
after the assembly had failed to
.muster the necessary two-thirds
majority for either of two rival
peace plans.

PRESIDENT NIXON will visit five European coun-
tries this month he said yesterday.

FEB. 22
Rackham Aud.
Admission FREE
8:30 P.M.

DR. ROLLO MAY PhD.

Existential Psychology

CONTEMPORARY
DISCUSSIONS

NtATIONAL GENERAL CORPORATION
NOW SKOWING FOA'X " T s..
Box Office Opens 1:15 P.M. 375 No.MAPLE RD.-769-1300

NOTICE!! CONTINUOUS
SHOWINGS DAILY

"
r
E
;
I-
"

"DAZZLING! Once yusee it, you'll never again picture
'Romeo&Juliet' quite the way you did before!" -LIFE

Speaking to reporters at his second White House news
conference Nixon said he will visit heads of government in
Brussels, London, Bonn, Rome, and Paris. He will also go to
West Berlin, and will visit Pope Paul in the Vatican.
He said he had no plans to confer in Paris with North
Vietnamese or National Liberation Front representatives to
the peace conference.
0 * 0
DELEGATES AT THE THIRD SESSION of the full
scale Paris talks made no progress yesterday.
Representatives of the National Liberation Front insisted
that there will be no progress unless South Vietnam's govern-
ment is ousted and the Americans deal directly with the NLF.
American Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge rejected the
proposed ouster of the Saigon government, and stood firm on
the allied contention that military de-escalation and rees-
tablishment of the demilitarized zone be considered now.
The talks will resume next Thursday.
In Saigon yesterday, President Nguyen Van Thieu said
South Vietnam's army is "ready to accept more of the respon-
sibility and to alleviate the burden for U.S. troops." South
Vietnamese and U.S. military commanders are studying plans
for a withdrawal of a sizable number of American combat
units sometime later this year.
GRAND VALLEY STATE COLLEGE in Grand Haven,
Mich. is seeking to clear the name of its student news-
paper of obscenity charges.
The college is going to court to have dismissed an entry
of default which arose in a case involving alleged obscenity
in the publication, the Lanthorn, last December. At that time,
Ottawa County Prosecutor James Bussard had issued an in-
junction against the paper, forcing it to cease publication.
The college will contest Bussard's action, claiming he had
no jurisdiction to issue the injunction. The default entry
means that the court awards victory in the case to the pros-
ecutor on the grounds that the college did not file a response
to the injunction at the time.
Meanwhile, a federal court hearing date to determine
whether the college was denied freedom of speech and press
by the injunction action still has not been set.
THE CREW OF THE PUEBLO was not aware of the
nature of their mission, the ship's senior quartermaster
said yesterday.
Charles B. Law also told a Navy courtiof inquiry that the
crew had no idea it was on hazardous duty. He defended the
actions of commander Lloyd M. Bucher, saying the skipper
"did a hell of a job."
Law also denied that the Pueblo ever violated the 12-mile
international navigational limit claimed by North Korea.
FIVE MAJOR DRUG FIRMS have agreed to pay $120
million to settle civil suits charging they rigged the price
of the "wonder" drug terracycline.
The federal government had charged the drug was pro-
duced for as little as 1.6 cents per capsule, but eventually cost
consumers 51 cents each.
American Cyanimid,.Bristol Meyers, Charles Pfizer and
Co., Uphohn Co., and Squibb-Beech-Nut Co. were the firms
involved in federal charges they had conspired to control the
production and distribution of $1.7 billion of the drug, one
of the most effective anti-biotics available.

t * _
W.C.FIELDS
HURRY!! ENDS
HURRY !! SUNDAY
Everybody's favorite dirty old man is bock in town. Putting it down once more for a whole,
new generation of potential Fields' cultists. And a whole generation of devoted Fields' addicts.
Whatever the subject, whatever the treatment, W. C. Fields' humor is more up-to-date than
the hippest of contemporary flicks.
Catch "My Little Chicadee" with the incomparable Mae West. And "You Can't Cheat An
Honest Man." That's all it should take to make W. C. your favorite dirty old man, too.
"YOU CAN'T CH EAT AN H ONEST MAN"
THUR. and FR I'-700, 9:30 SAT.-4:30, 7:00, 9:30
"MY LITTLE CHICKADEE" with MAE WEST"
SAT.-5:40, 8:10 THUR. and FRI.-8:10

R

5.FFHAE
'Til u psi-9 I

W. C.
THE FATAL
THE PHARMACIST

FIILDS
GLASS OF BEER
THE BARBER(SHOP

.1

I

LAUREL & HARDY
TOWED IN A HOLE
at ALICE'S RESTAURANT
Alice Lloyd Hall
Fri., Feb. 7 8 & 10
Soc

Is"Al

A

presents

THE ALVIN AlLEY

AMERICAN DANCE THEATRE

EXPERIMENTAL FILMS
Cinema Guild presents an international collection
of the newest and finest short experimental films
available today.
THE NOSE (1963) Alexander Alexejeff' employs his
weird pinboard animation to retell Gogol's nightmare
about a man who awakens one morning to find his
nose missing.
THE HAND (1965) Czech puppeter Jiri Trnka thinly
disguises an attack on the State's control of the artist
in the most hauntingly poignant puppet drama on film,
TIMEPIECE (1965) Jim Henson's satire on advertising
movies, and sex symbols-to the steady beating of the
humannheart.
NUMBERS (1966) Czech Pavel Prochazka's animated
exploration of the world of numbers and their relations
ship to people.
SPHERICAL SPACE Stan VanderBeek's lyrical nude and
nature study.

!f

I

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 8:30
in Hill Auditorium .
IN COOPERATION WITH THE CREATIVE ARTS FESTIVAL

I'r.I -N N LI rl VVL..-1I II

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