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February 05, 1969 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-02-05

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Wednesday, February 5, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Wednesday, February 5, 1969 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

VIETNAM PEACE

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Talks b
By WILLIAM L. RYAN
PARIS W) - The future of
the Vietnam talks may depend
now upon who can last longest
in an endurance test. Americans
and South Vietnamese are let-
ting it be known they have
plenty of staying power.
Which side, in the search for
peace, is under the most pres-
sure to reach some sort of set-
tlement? What happens if the
Americans and South Viet-'
namese dig in their heels with
a doggedness matching that of
North Vietnam and the Viet
Cong's N a t i o n a 1 Liberation
Front?
The prevalent conviction here
is, that nothing much is going to
happen at the formal sessions of
the negotiations.
Watchers at what evidently is
to become a weekly Thursday
ritual are convinced that only
small, secret meetings between
the contending sides can produce
results that might lead to rela-
tive peace in South Vietnam.
The dreary prospect is that
the four delegations at Thurs-
day meetings will repeat much
the same things to each other
across 26 feet of table.
Both sidelines watchers and
people involved in producing the
Niagara of familiar words oc-
cupy themselves after each ses-
sion with the unrewarding pas-

ecoming endurance test

time of searching for hidden
meanings and shades of differ-
ences.
For example, a case can be
made for the notion that there
are shades of difference be-
tween North Vietnam and the
Liberation Front and between
the Americans and their South
Vietnamese allies.
Much investigative attention,
for instance, was given to the
phrase of a U.S. spokesman that
there was "not a great deal of
difference" between the Amer-
ican and South Vietnamese
delegations on the question of
troops withdrawals.
Did this mean that there were
indeed differences that had to
be bridged?
Again, Hanoi's delegate spoke
Thursday of a settlement in
which the NLF "exists." Was
this a shade of difference? Why
hadn't the Hanoi delegate not
said "according to the political
program" of the NLF, as he had
in the past?
The fact is, the Hanoi dele-
gation did not have to say that.
He had said it before in the
same speech by insisting on a
settlement on terms of the
North Vietnamese four points
and the front's five points,
which stress a decisive role for
the NLF.
Thus, meanings are sought

where sometimes such mean-
ings do not exist. And informed
sources say the participants are
unlikely to tip their hands in
long statements prepared spe-
cifically for propaganda.
Hanoi and the Front give the
impression that they consider
themselves in a strong position.
Hanoi waited out the bombing
of North Vietnam until it got a
partial halt last March before
agreeing to talk at all. It got a
complete halt before agreeing to
talks on substance. It waited
again until it got the sort of

table it could accept without
surrendering the contention
that its NLF protege was an
equal participant.
What the Americans ;got in
return is not highly visible.
Now it appears that Hanoi is
prepared to hold out once again
for months, possibly on the as-
sumption that the Americans
will bend yet again on basic is-
sues
If the Americans were pre-
pared to hold out just as long.as
the other side, pressures would
begin to play a role.

Zambia may face
secession problem

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_ __ _

NATIONAL GENERAL, CORPORATION
STARTS FOX EASTERN TMEATRES
TODAY FOH VILLAGE
375 No. MAPLE RD.-"769-1300

Continuous
Showing
Daily

SHOWINGS DAILY 1:30-4:00-6:40-9:10
"DAZZLING! Once you see it, you'll never again picture
Romeo & Juliet' quite the way you did before!" - LIFE

AN EVENING FOR
KENNETH ANGER
--Scorpio Rising," filmI
-"Aurora": an electronic audio-collage
for Kenneth Anger
--Portfolio on "Scorpio Rising" distributed
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 5j

<<
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3
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By KENNETH L. WHITING
LUSAKA, Zambia (P) - Pre-
sident Kenneth Kaunda's re-
cognition of secessionist Biafra,
threatens to boomerang on his
government.
Tribal restlessness and mis-
trust of the central government,
similar to that in Nigeria be-
fore Biafra broke away, are
widespread in at least one Zam-
bian province.'
A secessionist movement has
existed in Barotse province
since Zambia became independ-
ent in 1964. Lozi tribesmen in
the region may think that what
is good enough for Biafra--with
Kaunda's blessing-should be
good enough for them.
The area is especially sensi-
tive. It is near Rhodesia and
Botswana and borders Portu-
guese Angola and the Caprivi
Strip of South-West Africa
which is cdntrolled by South
Africa. Other Lozi, pronounced
"low-zee", live just across the
frontier in Botswana and Ango-
la.
-.Some of the 300,000 Lozis re-
sisted losing their identity when
Boratseland was welded to
Northern Rhodesia as the new
republic of Zambia. Special pro-
visions were written into Zam-
bia's constitution to safeguard
certain powers and laws of the
litunga.
Selection of a new litunga and
Zambia's first general election
since independence brought
some of the simmering discon-
tent to a boil.
Instead of choosing a suppor-
ter of Kaundia's ruling United
National Independence party as
the new paramount chief on
the death of the old litunga,
tribal elders picked Godwin M.
Lewanika, 63. He campaigned
six years ago to keep Barotse-
land out of Zambia after the
Second Class postage paid at Ann
Arbor, Michigan, 420 Maynard St., Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Published daily Tuesday through
Sunday morning University year. Sub-
scription rates: $9.00 by carrier, $10.00
by mail.

breakup of the old Central Af-
rican Federation.
Kaunda attended his installa-
tion in December and had pri-
vate talks with Lewanika. How-
ever, Kaunda canceled a sched-
uled speech to the Barotse peo-
ple "because of the h e a v y
rain."
Kaunda's party won all the
seats in Barotse Province in
1964, but lost in eight of ele-
vent constituencies in the De-
cember election. The Lozis
swung to the weak African Na-
tional Congress party at the
prompting of former Cabinet
minister Nalumino Mundi
whose even smaller United par-
ty was banned six months ago
for causing violence.
Mundia, and other Lozis are
disgruntled by the ascendancy
of Bema tribesmen to high gov-
ernment posts and by economic
hardships.
Much Lozi income once came
from one-to-two-year stints as
laborers in the gold mines of
South Africa. Kaunda outlawed
South African recruitment of
Zambian labor and promised
the tribe he would find them al-
ternative sources of income. He
hasn't delivered. Opposition po-
liticians won in Barotse prov-
ince by promising to restore
permission to work in the mines
and the trade with white-ruled
Rhodesia and South Africa
which Kaunda has been trying
to reduce.
Kaunda criticized the opposi-
tion "for deceiving God's chil-
dren" and warned that "noth-
ing they speak about will take
place in Barotse Province."
When African tribal chiefs
clash with new nationalist poli-
ticians for leadership, the poli-
ticians nearly always win. But
the fact that most Africans now
seek political rather than tradi-
tional leadership doesn't alter
the old tribal organizations ov-
ernight.
"One Zambia, one nation" is
the national motto chanted at
official gatherings, but o f t e n
Zambians continue to identify
themselves first by tribe or re-
gion and then by nation.

the
news toda
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
ITALY BRACED for a nationwide strike today which
is expected to set off massive demonstrations.
Eighty per cent of the nation's 20-million member work
force has been ordered by their unions to stay off their jobs
today.
The strike, called by the leading labor unions, posed a
challenge to Premier Mariano Rumor's new and troubled
government.
Protest parades are scheduled in all major cities and po-
lice are prepared for violence. They fear that thousands of
students will join the workers and clash with police.
NGUYEN .CAO KY, vice president of South Vietnam,
plans to return to Saigon for Tet, the lunar new year.
Yesterday's report revived speculation a b o u t possible
changes in the South Vietnamese government.
The report said that Ky, the head of the South Vietna-
mese delegation to the Paris peace talks, likes to spend the
Tet holiday with South Vietnamese troops.
This coincided with talk about a possible recasting of
South Vietnam's cabinet under President Nguyen Van Thleu
and Ky.
PRESIDENT NIXON is about to make decisions on
Mideast policy, White House Press Secretary Ronald Zieg-
ler announced yesterday.
This announcement came while Nixon was meeting with
the National Security Council. Earlier in the day he consulted
with former President Johnson by telephone.
One decision might be a reply to the proposal of French
President de Gaulle for a big four session on restoring peace
in the Middle East.
Nixon is expected to visit Paris sometime in the next few
weeks as the first stop on a European tour.
French officials are hopeful the meeting between Nixon
and de Gaulle will mark a turning point in the relations be-
tween Paris and Washington.
They see this as a possible change in the long standing
relationship between London and Washington. In the past
the President has always met with the British prime minister
before meeting other allies.
* _," .
SEN. EDWARD M. KENNEDY (D-Mass.) called for a
thorough congressional inquiry into the soundness, neces-
sity and cost of national defense programs.
Kennedy, the senate majority whip, said this yesterday
while leading a biparitsan attack against the Sentinel anti-
ballistic missile system which Secretary of Defense Melvin R.
Laird has indicated the new Nixon administration supports.
Kennedy said the construction of the thin-line system
would be "a waste of money" and "may set back the cause of
world peace immeasurably."
SEN. GEORGE S. McGOVERN (D-S.D.) confirmed
yesterday that he will head a special reform group that
will seek to make the Democratic Party's nominating
procedures more democratic.
Sen. Fred Harris (D-Okla.), chairman of the Democratic
National Committee, said he will not make any announce-
ments concerning the committee until he has chosen all 25
members.
McGovern is known as a strong supporter of party
reform. Former Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey has said
the committee is the key to the success of the party in 170
and 1972.
THE NAVY announced the awarding of a contract
for the development of a new carrier based fighter to
f
replace the junked F111 (TFX.)
A four-year $388 million contract has been awarded to
Grumman Aircraft to develop the F14 fighter.
The supersonic F14 has a swing-wing design and will be
capable of firing on six bombers simultaneously at a range
of 50 miles.

7ac

University H.S. And. 7 730 and
across from E. Quad) 10:00 P.M.-
-SPONSORED BY THE RESIDENTIAL COLLEGE-
- - - - -

I

Grads and Senior Women

MEET PEOPLE!

I

GRAD COFFEE HOUR

Fri., Feb. 7

4-6:30 P.M.

International Center Recreation Room,
1st floor South wing Union
FREE REFRESHMENTS

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Or/4i UMHJSSIY/IMNAO WIING/MOo'sHEA/MIiHARYORK
JOHN Mc[XRVI/ PA HEY WIOD /NAJASHA PARRY/ BPBEBISIEflIENS -:.e t.,

SPECTACULAR SARN
A ilDi M

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q9

W. C. FIELDS
HELD OVER BY POPULAR DEMAND

OPEN SALES

BI WOJNI

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for
U
A MUSTET's

CAMELOT

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B'

NATIONAL GENERAL PICTURES Presents
GREGORY PECK * EVA MARIE SAINT
Paku THE STALKING MOON
Production of f ETLII~
TECHNICOLOR'. PANAVISION'
TONIGHT
HOOT
THURSDAY- 1421 Hill St.
8:34 P.M.
the incomparable
HERB DAVID-discussion
instrument making, repair, etc.
FRIDAY and SATURDAY-
ANDY WALLACE

IKTITAF

*1

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'St

Mendelssohn Box Office
Michigan League
10:00 A.M.,-3:00 P.M.

* PLUS*
THE SPIRIT
and
"Worst That Could
Happen"
THE BROOKLYN BRIDGE
Sun., Feb. 9 at 8 P.M.
MASONIC AUDITORIUM
Tickets: $5, $4, $3
Available at: Masonic Aud.
and all J1. L. Hudson &
Grinnell stores.

CINEMA II
FEBRUARY 7th and 8th
A
THOUSAND
CLOWNS
NOTE: Cinema I1
membership petitioning
soon
Fri.-Sat. 7-9 Aud. A and

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THE ALTERNATIVE

Everybody's favorite dirty old man is back in town. Putting it
down once more for a whole new generation of potential
Fields' cultists. And a whole generation of devoted Fields'
addicts. Whatever the subject, whatever the treatment, W. C.
Fields' humor is more up-to-date than the hippest of contem-
porary flicks.
Catch "My Little Chickadee" with the incomparable Mae
West. Then see "You Can't Cheat An Honest Man." That's all
it should take to make W. C. your favorite dirty old man, too.
"YOU CAN'T CHEAT AN
nkI .CT kA AN"

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STUDENT-FACULTY
CO-OP COFFEE HOUSE

EM

-Needs broad student support. Your share will help
create a unique meeting place for students and faculty.
Only five dollars each (refundable) on sale in the Fish-
bowl this week.

THE ONCE GROUP

Creative Arts Festival
presents on
Thursday, Feb. 6th
A& A WICA ®

I

presents
TwJ TRI At F ANNIEOPDIFWENRER AND

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III

Got ideas for decor, activities, etc.?

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