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January 10, 1969 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1969-01-10

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, January 10, 1969

I I

r a - f _ l ,. ...

cinema
4n abominable box of 'Candy'

Medical Science I:
Seventeen years late

Candy, now at the Fox Vil-
lage, teaches you lessons.
Number one: American movie-
goers have advanced to the
point where sex for its own sake
is no longer to entertain.
Number two: The bastard-
ization of fine literary proper-
ties by leering, box office-mind-
ede producers is continuing on
a repulsively large scale.
Number three: A normally
fine screenwriter like Buck
Henry (The Graduate) is never-
thless given the right come-on,
able to flop abysmally and em-
barrassingly.
Number four: Even a totally
tasteless, inept director like
Christian1-Marquand cannot ruin
,the performance of an excep-
tional actor.
And of all of Candy' lessons,
only number four is a happy one.
Richard Burton, Walter Mat-
thau, James Coburn, and Mar-
Ion Brando were given the op-
portunity in this wholly repul-
sive vehicle to prove that despite
the greatest collection of insur-
mountable obstacles, they could
still shine for their brief mo-
ments on screen.
That it had to be that way is
really a shame. Never before
had I wanted to like a movie as
much ae I.wished to with Candy;
the Terry Southern-Mason Hof-
fenberg book was a comic mas-
terpiece that I've long cher-
ished, and there seemed to be
little reason for it to be a fail-
ure as a film -especially with
that kind of cast. But the mat-
Hunter play
postponed
The world premiere of Evan
Hunter's new play, The Con-
juror, has been /postponed until
the week of Nov. 3, Robert C.
Schnitzer, executive director of
the Professional Theatre Pro-
gram, announced yesterday.
A major star, who was not
able to reschedule current com-
mitments to come to Michigan
for the previously announced
February date, plans to partici-
pate next fall.
Hunter, author of The Black-
board Jungle, will come to Ann
Arbor in the autumn to work on
the preparation of his play with
director Marcella Cisney. Both
director and author felt that
the production would benefit by
additional time for script revi-
sions arid casting. Work on film-
ing required for the complex
production, which employs rear
screen projection integrated
with live staging and utilizes a
large cast, also requires further
time.
Patrons who purchased tickets
for The Conjuror at a discount
by subscribing the New Play
Series will. still get the discount
if they hold their tickets for
the production next fall. Re-
funds may be obtained at the
PTP ticket office if desired.

ter-of-fact irony that so char-
acterizes Southern's work was
perverted into cheap burlesque;
the good performances of the
four actors mentioned above al-
most drowned in the remaining
muck.
What Marquand and his
Rome-based staff did, basically,
was pander to the kind of humor
that should be confined to lock-
er rooms and the back of the
expensive magazines at the Blue
Front. Aunt Liv, who in the book
was a gross-cut gem with a
super-suburban libido, in the
film is expected to score simply
by tossing off ill-timed and
banal one-liners that appeal to
sniggering voyeurism, not to

humor. Candy talentless, but
pretty, Ewa Avlin herself is a
character blown to the super-
human qualities of an Every-
woman by Marquand's framing
of the film in a starry trip
through the cosmos-in the
book, she became universal en-
tirely on her own merits.
And the four good perform-
ances: Burton's brilliance as
Mac Phisto the Welsh poet (re-
member? The character was
once the subline Prof. Mephisto)
sufers by the needless intrusion
of non-actor Sugar Ray Robin-
son as a shuffle-mah-feet
chauffeur. Matthau is a new
character, a right-wing Air
Force general, and he plays the

role well; but it is a direct crib
from George C. Scott and Keen-
an Wynn in Dr. Strangelove.
Coburn is given the best ma-
terial, and performs ably; that
it goes on too long can be
blamed only on the director. The
best of the lot, though, is Bran-
do, who is a fake guru who
lapses into hilarious Bronxese
when his transcendental genti-
lity flops. But his scene drags
too long, comes too late, and is
diluted by a massive collection
of incidental irrelevancies that
merely allow the producers the
chance to shove in a relieving
intermission.
There's so much to say, but
the film just isn't worth it.

(Continued from Page 1)
been enlarged. The nursing
school has tripled in size.
One important advantage of
the new Medical Science II
building is that for the first time
since 1869, when the whole Med-
ical School was on central cam-
pus, both the science and the
clinical departments will be to-
gether.
When Medical Science II is
completed, hopefully for next
fall, the science departments-

physiology, anatomy, and micro-
biology-will be able to move
there from the East Medical
building on East University
Street.
The College of Pharmacy will
then move into East Medical
from the Chemistry and Phar-
macy building. The Pharmacy
Research building is connected
to East Medical and it will be
more convient for the college to
be located near it.

x

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ITHE MICHIGAN DAILY

poetry, and prose

Kos-inski coming on Monday

This year's first writer-in-res-
idence, Jerzy Kosinski, will takej
up residence in Alice Lloyd begin-
ning Jan. 13. Despite the bill-
boards which proclaim his arrival
yesterday, Kosinski will not begin
his week of lectures and discus-
sions until Monday.
The 35-year-old author of two
novels and of two works of non-
fiction under the name of Joseph
Novak, has won glowing praise for
his work. Born in Poland in 1933,
Kosinski learned no English until
his arrival in the United States
in 1957. Nevertheless considerable
attention has focused on his
shiovels,, The Painted Bird and
i6teps.
The first is the horrifying "first
person, presumably autobiographi-
cal narrative of a young boy's
brutalizing experiences in Poland
during World War II. It evoked a
landscape and people-not Nazis
but Polish peasants, anyone-who
had become almost wholly devoid
of compassion and whose nurtur-
ing instinct such as it had ever
been, had been almost wholly dis-
placed by a kind of mindless, call-
ous sadism," according to a New
York Times book review.
In his own pamphlet on The
Painted Bird, Kosinski described
the work as "the author's vision
of himself as a child, a vision not
a revisitation of childhood . . . the
result of the slow unfreezing of a
mind long gripped by fear .st
Stanley Kaufman flatly stated
"It is one of the best works of
literature to have come out of
the European horror."
Undoubtedly due to the success
of his first novel, which came out
in paperback in 1966, critics paid
careful attention to the release of
Kosinski's newer work, Steps, re-
leased at the end of last year.
Kaufman reserved homage for,
Steps, as a book "so scorchingly
personal that it is unique.
"It pushes into extraordinary
inner chambers, echoing and ap-
paling. . . Some of the episodes
suggest Babel, some a darker Din-

esen, some de Ma'upassant. .It is
a strongly sexual novel; it is also
a novel about terror, killing, fear,
politics, and the scraping-out of
some little plateaus of tranquility
in a sliding-climbing existence. ..
The physica power of Kosin-
ski's prose is reflected in the au-
thor's varied artistic interests. Part
of his lecture time will be spent
exploring parallels between film
and fiction. Kosinski is scheduled
to discuss the German classic M
which will be shown from 4-6 p.m.
in the Architecture Aud. next
Monday and Tuesday. His evening
lecture Tuesday will also be pre-
ceded by a film, Eisentein's fam-
ous Odessa steps montage from
The Battleship Potemkin.
Second class postage paid at Ann
Arbor, Michigan. 420 Maynard St., Ann
Arbor, Michigan,.48104.
Daily except Monday during regular
academic school year.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 10
RABBI JAMES GORDON OF YOUNG ISRAEL OF OAK WOODS
SPEAKS at the FIRST HILLEL SABBATH
SERVICE OF THE SEMESTER 7:15 P.M.
on
"PREMARITAL SEX AND
THE JEWIISH MORAL, CODE"
SATURDAY, JANUARY 11
RABBI GORDON ALSO SPEAKS AT SHALOSH SEUDOT at 12:30 on:
"WHAT INGREDIENT DOES JUDAISM OFFER
A HAPPY MARRIAGE?"
TO ATTEND THE LUNCHEON, AS WELL AS THE TALK, RESERVATIONS MUST BE MADE IN ADVANCE
WITH THE KOSHER KO-OP 663-4129.
SUNDAY, JANUARY 12
ISRAELI FOLK DANCING at 2-4
DELI PLUS at 5:30
FIRST DELI OF THE SEMESTER PLUS
AN INFORMAL MIXER
GRAD MIXER at 8:30
BEER WILL BE SERVED - YOU MUST BE 21 TO ATTEND

1i

Kosins ki

NATIONAL 6ENERAS. CORPORATION __

HELD OVER
4TH WEEK

NATIONAL GENERAL CORPORATION
FOX EASTERN THEATRESmmi
3FO.AVILL6E
35 No. MAPLE RD. "769.1300

MON.-FRI.
_7:00-9:20
SAT.-SUN.
2:00-4:20-
6:45-9:10

good grief i6i caredy!
and S94"PWciwel Corp. pVeW
Chaies Aznavur.Mcidon BmMndo WRkhard Burton-James Coburn
John Huson WakerFtthau.Ringo 5tr A EwAurin4
ItESTMtTED
M ted, Unless16 ftompny
by.a Parent of Gwua'd.

B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION

*

1429 Hill St.

,'
00

1 La--

WRITER-IN-RESIDENCE PROGRAM
PRESENTS

t

"ARTISTRY&EROTIC SM"

JERZY

KOSI

SKI

JANUARY 13-19

4

Cue Magazine

N.Y. Times

"THE MOVIE HAS THE CAREFUL TEMPO OF A MINUET,
WHICH COUNTERPOINTS ITS DESPERATE EROTICISM!"
N.Y. Times

r.SURELY THIS IS
.AMONG THE MOST
EROTIC OF MOVIES!
The movie's artistry
raises the subject
matter to the level
of personality
exploration. THE
EXPERIENCE IS
BIZARRELY
COMPELLING 1
Cue Magazine
6'LEAVES NOTHING TO
THE IMAGINATION!
GOES TOO FAR!"5

'A HIGHLY EROTIC
FILM! IT SHOULD
BECOME A CAUSE
CELEBRE WITH THE
WHATEVER-TURNS-
YOU-ON SET! Glenda
Jackson is really
tremendous!
ENGROSSING!
OFFBEAT AND
DIFFERENT!"99
WINS Radio
"6SEXUAL AND INVECTIVE
AND PERFORMANCES OF
MEMORABLE QUALITY!"
N. Y. Post

MONDAY, JANUARY 13
8 P.M. Opening Lecture
"The Painted Bird: A Metaphor
of the Twentieth Century"
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
Reception Following
TUESDAY, JANUARY 14
10 A.M.-Noon Office Hours
4:10 P.M. "The Writer and Collevtivity:
The Soviet Dilemma"-Aud. D
5:30 P.M. Dinner with Russian Center
8 P.M. "Montage in Cinema & Modern
Fiction"
Rackham Amphitheatre
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15
*10 A.M.-Noon Office Hours
Noon Discussion-"Contemporary U.S.A.,
The Marxist View"-Canterbury House
5:30 Dinner at Bursley
2E D kAISc ~~en nn a

THURSDAY, JANUARY 16
10 A.M. on Novelists' workshop
at Canterbury,
1 P.M. Prof. Ingram's English Class
3 P.M. Hopwood Tea, Hopwood Room,
Angell Hall
4-5:30 P.M. Prof. Welsh's Polish Lit Class
3040 Frieze Bldg.
5:30 P.M. Dinner and Discussion at
Markley Hall
FRIDAY, JANUARY 17
9 A.M. Prof. Diamond's Anthropology Class
Subject: "Children of Europe 1939-45"
229 Angell
2 P.M. Prof. Wolf's Class
"Peasant Society"
2402 Mason
5:30 P.M. Dinner and Discussion at
Alice Lloyd
SATURDAY, JANUARY 18
2 P.M. A Reading and Discussion
in Living Room of Stockwell
SUNDAY, JANUARY 19
0% n 11 1'I D 1- - l~ xaY:iri

i

4

N.Y. Daily News

A BIZARRE MODERN DRAMA OF A MAN AND TWO WOMEN
LOCKED IN A SENSUAL GAME OF SEX.

III

I

I

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