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February 04, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-02-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Tuesday, February 4, 1969

T,'-4E MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Thr

WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY

4:10 P.M.

CURRICULA CHANGES-

Department of Speech, Student Laboratory Theatre
in cooperation with The Department of English
and The Creative Arts Festival presents
MASADAH-.-by Irving Biglo
TELL ME WHERE IT HURTS YOU
by Frank Beaver
FEBRUARY 5th & 6th ADMISSION FREE
Arena Theatre, Frieze Building
Where in the world are you going
Next Summer? Next Semester?
Meet the Man who can help you decide. About Brazil or
Japan, Chile or Poland. Consider Denmark, Ghana,
Greece, India, Israel, Morocco, Tanzania, Turkey or
Yugoslavia. That's just the beginning. The Man from
EIL has 25 other countries to tell you about. What do you
do there? Discover one country, one culture in depth. Live
there as a family member, meeting people, traveling with
them, making lasting international friendships. You're onI
the .inside, involved with the people, finding out what
makes a country tick.
SUMMER PROGRAM IN 38 COUNTRIES. Academic se-
mester programs in 13 locations abroad.
COME HEAR THE MAN FROM Eli
The Man-Pat Vescio EIL-The Experiment in
International Livingi
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 5: 10 a.m.; 2 p.m.; 4 p.m.; 8 p.m.
THE INTERNATIONAL CENTER, 603 E. Madison St.
(South Wing of Michigan Union)

Schoolt
By GARVEN HUDGINS
WASHINGTON ()P) - An in-
tense campaign is underway in
the nation's schoolsuandruniver-
sities to restore the Negro to
the pages of American history
where his role in the past has
been frequently inscribed with
invisible ink.
Major school systems, col-
leges and universities - many
of them in the South - are
changing texts and curricula to
adopt more black history and to
reflect this nation's pluralistic
society.
The effort is for the most part
the work of enlightened educa-
tors but also is partially the re-
sult of demands from Negro
leaders and community authori-
ties and from legislators attun-
ed to black voters.
Operating on the fringe are
those who see opportunity in
economic exploitation of black
history.
"It's pathetic," says Seattle
School District Director of So-
cial Studies' Armand Golang.
"This is too important a topic to
exploit. But we've reached a
peak. We are oversaturated with
material and too much of it is
no good - too much of it is a
publisher trying to make a
buck."
The prestigious Lincoln Filene
Center for Citizenship and Pub-
lic Affairs at Tufts University
has just completed a federally
financed research project on in-
structional material and teach-
ing strategies for dealing with
race in American life.
Correlating results of the re-
search, t h e Center's John S.

revi ve
Gibson reported: "It is general-
ly assumed that instructional
materials which have pictures
of black students, stories about
blacks in the suburbs and con-
siderable emphasis on key black
figures of history serve to make
a substantial improvement in
the teaching and learning about
democratic human relations,
This assumption is invalid."
The Lincoln Filene Center re-
search, Gibson said, demon-
strates that it is more effective
to give a child a realistic under-
standing of past and present by
including contributions to the
development of America by peo-
ple from a w i d e variety of
groupings and nations.
Textbook publishers, Gibson
says, can make significant con-
tributions by focusing their
materials on "the realities of
life in our society and a bal-
anced presentation of man and
society in t h e United States
yesterday and today."
Dr. Joseph Applegate, direc-
tor of Howard University's 40-
year-old Center for African
Studies, believes many schools
and colleges are hurriedly ad-
opting African culture courses
under pressure and without a
clear idea of what they're get-
ting into,
"In a way, it's like the fran-
tic activity which took place in
some fields after the Russians
put up Sputnik 1," Applegate
says. "There were Russian de-
partments and Russian studies
springing up all over the place.
But eventually things settled
down, just as they will in this
area of Afro-American studies.

black history

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SATIRE AT ITS
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FUNNY..:
ISN'T
,Pl.A.Times
(a session with
"THE COMMITTEE"
Exactly as presented LIVE on stage in San Francisc6 ad LosAngeles!

BE INFORMED!
Subscribe to
This Semester
Call 764-0558, Mori.-Fri., 10:00-3:30,
or use this order form

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We will attain a greater exper-
tise in this field and then we
will have an extra dimension
gleaned from the ideas contrib-
uted by a totally different cul-
ture."
"What many people call the
search for identity is something
else," he adds. "It's the idea
that the students want to get
information from sources which
have been neglected, These
sources may be people from Af-
rica or they may lie in material
many people would toss aside as
worthless.
"But a great many of these
students identify themselves,
after all, as Americans. Still,
they want to get ideas which
may be quite different from
those they have been able to ac-
quire from ordinary sources
available to them in the past."
In Seattle, Golang also be-
lieves the time is past for look-
ing at the need for compensa-
tory courses on the Negro solely
f r o m a quantitative point of
view.
"We have to look at it qualita-
tively," he says, "what we need
to do is incorporate black histo-
ry into regular American hs-
tory. To kids who demand sep-
arate Afro-American courses, I
say: "You are at 9 a.m. yester-
day when it is 4 p.m. today'"
Demands for establishment of
independent African depart-
ments - with student authority
to hire and fire teachers - has
led to disturbances in some uni-
versity campuses.
These demands have b e e n
madeby the more militant black
students joined by radical white
student organizations.
But Roy Wilkins, executive di-
rector of the National Associa-
tion for the Advancement of
Colored People, has said that
"black students asking for black
automony within colleges is an-
other version of Jim Crow seg-
regation."
These campus disturbances
are considered by many educa-
tors as incidental to the princi-
pal issue which is the over-
whelming trend to spread the
instruction of the Negro's role
in American history in schools,
colleges and universities across
the land.
Seattle has introduced elec-
tive b l a c k history courses at
most high schools and Incorpo-
rated "minority history" into
social studies classes in elemen-
tary and junior high schools.
All colleges in the Seattle area
offer at least one elective course
in black history.
Seattle's Garfield High School,
with an enrollment 55 per cent
Negro, offers t h e city's most
extensive black studies program,
including courses in Afro-Amei-
ican history, black art history,
African dance, Swahili and an
anthroplogy class on origins of
the Negro race.
New university programs in
Afro-American studies include a
program at Yale under which
students will be able to major in
the field during their four un-
dergraduate years.
Anticipating objections that
the new program may have been
stimulated by political rather
than intellectual motivations,
a Yale spokesman said:
"The only valid justificcation
for the program, and the only

one advanced by those who pro-
pose this major, is that it ful-
fills legitimate educational needs
at Yale and meets the standards
we expect in all our majors. It
is hard to say which is the most
appalling, the ignorance of
whites about black people or the
ignorance of Afro-Americans
about their own experience."
Study of the Negro in U.S.
history is required at Illinois
State University, Cornell is es-
tablishing a new Afro-American
studies program a n d thre
courses on black culture have
been instituted at the Univer-
sity of Montana.
Enrollment in a University of
Minnesota course in "Race and
Nationality in American Histo-
ry" has jumped from 30 to more
than 200, and the University of
Pennsylvania is offering a wide
spectrum of courses on the Ne-
gro in American culture, includ-
ing "The Negro in Revolt" and
"Race Relations In the United
States."
Northwestern University's cur-
riculum now includes four new
undergraduate courses on Af-
rican culture; Harvard has es-
tablished seminar courses in
Afro-American history and the
University ofeSouth Carolina
this year offers "Geography
501," a course for juniors, sen-
iors and graduate students on
economic development and ur-
banization in Africa.
Indiana University this year
launched a year-long look at so-
cial, political and economic con-
tributions of black Americans in
a series of courses labelled:
"Focus: Black America."
P. T. Baker, administrative di-
rector of instruction for schools
in Austin, Tex., acknowledges
that a shortage of qualified
teachers is a major problem in
trying to step up instruction in
this area.
"We are moving into the sub-
ject more every w e e k," says
Baker. "But,tbeing brutally
frank, our teachers are not
qualified to go very deeply into
this."
To help meet the problem,
Austin has instituted a series of
training lectures for social stud-
ies teachers.
A shortage of adequate books
on the subject of the Negro's
role in American history also
hampers instructors.
As for texts there is disagree-
ment among publishers regard-
ing whether 'sufficient mater-
ials are available to meet in-
creasing demands for Afro-
American courses at all school
levels.
Spokesmen for Holt, Rinehart
and Winston Inc. and for Pren-
tice-Hall said they have taken a
hard look at the subject and
have "attempted to integrate
materials on the issue."
They concede, however, that
neither company yet offers any-
thing dealing specifically with
Afro-American history.
A spokesman for Houghton
Mifflin Co. said the demand for
materials dealing with Afro-
American culture has been ex-
tremely active not only in re-
cent months but for the past
few years. He believes most pib-
lishers have been meeting the
'demand.
Milton Goldberg, director of
the Philadelphia Board of Edu-
cation's Curriculum Develop-
ment Department, comments:
"We are reviewing all text-
books and eliminating those
th a t perpetuate distortion or
myths about Africa or Afro-
American history. A committee
of teachers selects the textbooks
that represent the best new sch-
olarship in the field of history.
A bad history or a half history
is harmful for all kids."

Ii

-J,

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
PRIME MINISTER TERENCE O'NEIL of North Ire-
land is calling on his country's electorate to decide wheth-
er the government is dealing correctly with civil rights
troubles.
O'Neil's cabinet announced last night that Parliament
will be dissolved today and a general election will be held
Feb. 24. The election will have at stake Northern Ireland's
constitutional position within the United Kingdom, the Cab-
inet added.
O'Neil's leadership is being attacked by members of his
own Union party as well as from leaders in the civil rights
feud between Protestants and Roman Catholics.
Northern Ireland is a predominantly Protestant province
of Great Britain. Militants among Northern Ireland's 500,000
Roman Catholics - a one-third minority in the country -
contend that Catholics are victims of discrimination in jobs,
housing, and local voting.
* * *
JAMES E. ALLEN JR. was .appointed U.S. commis-
sioner of education .and assistant secretary of health,
education, and welfare, President Nixon announced yes-
terday.
In a White House statement on the appointment, Nixon
said that Allen, presently the New York state commissioner
of education, will play a leading role in shaping national
policy on education.
Speaking to newsmen, Allen said he has been involved
in the question of community participation in education and
favors giving people in the community the opportunity to
have a say in school affairs.
ISRAELI PLANES STRAFED a Jordanian village yes-
terday after an Israeli army patrol was fired upon near
the border.
A spokesman in Tel Aviv said that two jets had struck
across the Jordan River and both had returned to the base.
Iraqui sources said that 14 Israeli jets attacked Iraqu
forces in Jordan and that Iraqui ground fire brought down
two planes.
Jordanian sources claimed that there were three Israeli
jets. Jordan also charged that several fields in the area were
set ablaze by napalm.
Israel has denied the charges of both countries.
EDUARDO CHIVAMBO MONDLANE, president of the
Mozambique Liberation Front was assassinated yesterday.
Mondlane rated as one of Africa's top revolutionary lead-
ers had turned the front from a tribal group into the most
effective guerrilla outfit fighting the Portuguese for control
of Mozambique.
The Front has about 8,000 men fighting in the northern
providences of Mozambique and holding down a Portuguese
army many times larger.
SOUTH VIETNAM appears ready to make concessions
for peace and would like to talk directly with Hanoi.
Vice-President Nguyen Ky said at a news conference yes-
terday in Paris that South Vietnam has "made many con-
cessions and are ready to make more." All that South Viet-
nam asks of Hanoi, says Ky, is for "better understanding."
" The South Vietnamese delegation is not willing to take up
political problems at the conference table before military
matters are discussed, according to Ky. This is also a priority
demand of North Vietnam and the National Liberation Front.
ALBERT SHANKER leader of last fall's racially bitter
New York City public school strike, was sentenced to 15
days in jail for illegal leadership of the strike.
Justice Frank J. Bloustein, of the State Supreme Court,.
noted that the division between the Negro, and Jewish com-
munities was heightened by the strike of the AFL-CIO United
Federation of Teachers.
Shanker, president of the union, was fined $250 while the
UFT was fined $220,000.
He was found in contempt of court for ignoring back-to-
work orders last fall. Under the state's Taylor law, public em-
ployes are prohibited to strike.
MORE PUEBLO HEARINGS will be held by the House
Armed Services Committee after those of the Navy Court
' are completed.
The committee will attempt to resolve what Chairman,
L. Mendel Rivers (D-S.C.) called the "m a n y unanswered

questions and some inconsistancies."
At the organizational meeting of the committee yester-
day, Rivers said: "I believe it is a mistake to attempt to place
full responsibility on any one individual."
Rivers introduced legislation to brand the North Koreans
responsible for the torture of the intelligence ship's crew as
international criminals.

NATIONAL GENERAL PICTURES Presents
GREGORY PECK - EVA MARIE SAINT
In a Pakula-ucgnu THE STALKING MOON
G TECHNICOLOR'-PANAVISION'

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DAILY SUBSCRIPTIONr
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Street No. Street Name, Apt. No.
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* WE WILL BILL YOU LATERr
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Creative Arts Festival
presents TONIGHT
UNION-LEAGUE one performance only
JOHN PERRAULT
"A poet who is the spectator
of his own imagination."
Kinetic poetry.. . a melange of the senses.
Aud. A- 8p.m.-50c general admission

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Second Class postage paid at Ann
Arbor, Michigan, 420 Maynard St., Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Published daily Tuesday through
Sunday morning University year. Sub-
scription rates: $9.00 by carrier, $10.00
by mail.
NANSOM

Mark's Coffee House
605 E. William 769-1593
FEB. 4th and 5th
"Thunderbolt
Josef Von Sternberg, director with
George Bancroft and Richard Ar-
Ion.
8 and 10 p.m. 75c

HELD OV
ATE
T °- 7th WEEK
Info: 662-6264
SHOWS AT 1 :00-3:00-5:00-7:10 & 9:15

ER

U
U

ALSO: The Gamelan Society
8 p.m.-Hill Aud.-FREE

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ATTENTION
Creative Reform Sabbath Service
and Oneg Shabbat

,THE IONC(E 'GROUP
presents
THE TRIAL OF ANNIE OPIE WEHRER AND
UNKNOWN ACCOMPLICES FOR CRIMES
AGAINST HUMANITY
PLACE: Michigan League Ballroom
TIME: 8:30 p.m., Friday and Saturday
February 7 & 8, 1969
TICKETS ON SALE at Discount Records, Centicore Bookshop,
Plaster of Paris, and Creative Arts Festival Booths (Michigan
League and The Fishbowl). $1.50 Students, $2.00 General Ad-
mission.,

I

T~r v Creative Arts Festival
presents on
UNION-LEAGUE Thursday, Feb. 6th

FRIDAY, FEB. 7
A -L1.Ii , I . .

8:15 P.M.
KL- Q

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