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February 02, 1969 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-02-02

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Sunday, February 2, 1969
STUDENT-WORKER EFFORT:

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

Do new Czech protests spell
return to pre-invasion reform?

y ,

By NICK JANKOWSKI
Last of Two Parts
PRAGUE (CPS) - The firey
suicide of student Jan Palach
brought to the surface the dis-
content of students and workers
with the country's Czech gov-
ernment.
The student-worker fusion
was underlined by the second
attemptrat self-immolation -
a worker, Josef Hlavaty. Now.
the question becomes how long
will this hyper-political sensi-
tivity last? Will workers and
the population at large be
drugged by a productive, in-
creasingly affluent society? Will
they then behave as American
workers do, striking only for
higher salaries? The Czechs are
far from affluent by Western
standards, but the question
would become real given acou-
ple of years of economic re-
forms. The danger is that
wealth is another "opium of the
people."
T h e question of apathy is
particularly interesting in the
context of Hungary. Economic
A reforms in Hungary are emerg-
ing much faster than in Czech-
oslovakia. Moreover, the Rus-
sians are not bothering them,
most probably because the Hun-

garians are not politicized. There
is virtually an absolute dictator-
ship in Hungary.
In a discussion on Czechoslo-
vakia, someone inevitably asks
whether Czechoslovakia w a s
really socialist in its reforms or
whether in fact it was drifting
toward the West, toward cap-
italism. The Cubans have made
a point of criticizing Czechoslo-
vakia's relation with westei n
economics.
It seems strange to see the
Cubans throwing stones. It is
sad that Cuba has not made
much economic advancement in
ten years. There are many rea-
sons for this stagnation; never-
theless the lack of progress
should leave Castro with more
humility toward the strivings
of other struggling communist
nations.
Death lies. in rigidity of
thought. Communism, Marxism,
and Leninism w e r e originally
conceived in a different period
of time. They must necessarily
change with the times. It is
not the "ism" which is of su-
preme importance, but Wh a t
happens, what people do.
The Czechs in this respect
were doing several things; but
* especially they were distribut-

i

ing power to the people. In no
other communist country-per-
haps in no other country in the
world - was there real oneness
between the government a n d
the governed, as in Czechoslo-
vakia between January and Au-
gust.
The workers, during that per-
iod, experienced such a surge of
decision-making that the man-
agerial class became virtually
obsolete. Workers' councils, the
decision-making bodies in fac-
tories, began taking over the
plants, with all the workers par-
ticipating in the decisions about
what was to be done, where,
when, and by whom.
Such participation created
havoc with the centralized eco-
nomic planning Czechoslovakia
experienced prior tohJanuary
1968, and the type the Soviet
Union still struggles with. It is
a choice of values .
The Czechs coined the term
"socialism with a human face"
to describe their interpretation
of Marxism-Leninism. T h i s
phrase meant a marriage be-
tween the economics of social-
ism and the freedoms of de-
mocracy. Impossible? Perhaps.
Perhaps impossible because of
t h e inherent difficulties in
adopting W e s t e r n economic
practices : creation of a r e a 1
market where supply and de-
mand determine price of pro-
ducts, productionrincentives,
competition.
Given the chance, the Czechs
could have warded off the evils
of capitalism qnd stopped short
of the exploitative, manipula-
tive society Americans know so
well. The Russians were n o t
needed to save the Czechs from
that danger.
The real difficulty in the
marriage of socialism and de-
mocracy was in gaining guard-
ian approval for the ceremony.
T h e Russians were simply
against democratic innovations
at that time, 1968.
When? When the thaw reach-
es the' Soviet heartland, when
Russia itself begins to open up.
until then, the future looks dim.
un en, r .

-Associated Press

Thousands march in Belfast

p 'v

SINGLES
Graduate Party

SUNDAY, FEB. 2
8:00 ,
1429 Hill

graduate council
of Hillel

The Rev. Ian Paisley, center, yesterday led thousands of protestant demonstrators through Belfast
demanding the ouster of Northern Ireland's Prime Minister Terence O'Neill and protesting a jail "
sentence given him for leading an unlawful counter-demonstration against a Catholic civil rights
march last November. He is presently out on bail.
NEA CONFERENCE:
Blacks ask education group
forlocal control of schools
WASHINGTON (CPS) -- Black tual replay of the New York crisis, black caucus is that NEA consult
dissidents have confronted the with implications for all big Amer- the Association of Afro-American
side N al conal A ican cities. Educators before making state-
Until then, NEA's staff will no ments or decisions -affecting ed-
ciation with two major organ- 'doubt attempt to quietly imple- ucation of blacks.
izational challenges-the involve- ment the other demand issued by The black caucus thanked "Sis-
ment of disadvantaged young peo- the black caucus. at a "summit ter" Elizabeth D. Koontz, NEA
ple in policy-making, and en- conference" here last weekend - president and a black, for calling
dorsement of community control black student power within NEA the conference, but called the gen-
over schools. itself. eral NEA hierarchy "hypocritical."
The issue of who should run the Ydung -people--the "consumers All but five of the NEA's 90-man
schools has imperiled the New of education"-especially the de- board of directors are white; one
York City system this year, and linquent, drop-out, disadvantaged of the five executive committee
promises to be a threat to NEA it- and deprived, should be invited members is black. "The NEA main-
self. The organization faces a di- to all NEA meetings with expenses tains his lily-white leadership, yet
lemma: many members believe in paid and with "actual voice" in calls a meeting on critical educa-
the concept of community control, decisions, the black caucus urged. lion issues, most of which relate
but they also must insure protec- "This is necessary in order that to black people," the dissidents
tion of teacher rights. Those rights educators know the real pulse of said.
are endangered when parents can black youth." Besides the black caucus pro-
hire and fire at whim, they argue. The blacks called for complete posals (which will be aired at the
NEA's delegate assembly will be restructuring of the education as- Philadelphia convention in July),
squarely faced with the issue in sociation to allow for participation NEA was advised to make a new
July: the meeting should be a vir- of blacks "from a base of power effort at activism-"action rather
rather than frustration." Besides than double talk," an education
black youth, parents and other professor from the University of
second Class postage paid at Ann black leaders would be a part of Maryland put it.
Arbor, Michigan, 420 Maynard St., Ann NEA decision-making. Whitney Young, Jr., executive
Published daily Tuesday through "We are not impressed," said director of the National Urban
Sunday morning University year. Sub- Frank Wilderson of the University League, urged the association to
scription rates: $9.00 by carrier, $10.00 of Minnesota, "with the extent to "involve itself in much more than
by mail. which both races are reacting to teacher welfare. NEA should set up
the seriousness and critical nature model schools, domestic Marshall
of the crisis facing black children programs. When kids see their
"Extra Brilliance." -New York Times in our schools. Black educators teachers striking for these things
"A Phenomenon... Astonishing have a upique responsibility ,to -not just for higher salaries--
Virtuosityi1« -Net Parool, Amsterdam make know the tragedy of mis- they will know their teachers care
"Such Consummate Artistry Is A Rare education and inequality of schol- about them. Being professional
Experience!"-Aftonbladet, Stockholm astic onrtunitv" he sid.oes not mean staying aloof from

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Servicr
SPANISH POLICE, using emergency powers have ex-
iled 16 lawyers and professors to remote areas of Spain.
The action is part of a campaign to subdue disorders In
state universities.
The last unofficial report from the police put total ar-
rests at more than 200.
The most prominent person exiled was Gil Robles, a law-
yer and son of the Christian Democrat leader and professor
Jose Marie Gil Robles.
The elder Robles was exiled for a period in 1962 for at-
tending what was described as an anti-Spansish gathering
in &ermany.
THE UNITED STATES and its Atlantic Alliance part- '
ners have presented France bills totalling about $800
million.
The bills represent what the members of NATO feel is
the "residual value" of more than 400 installations built in
France while France was a member of NATO's military com-
mand.
President DeGaulle withdrew France from the military
command in March, 1966, and gave its members a year to
leave the country.
The claims were presented in separate notes; one for
abandoned U.S. installations and the other for facilities which
formed part of NATO's infrastructure.
Hard bargaining seems certain, especially since authori-
tative French sources said their government was deciding
how to reject the notes.
* . .
PRINCE NORODOM SIHANOUK of Cambodia accus-
ed U.S.-South Vietnamese forces of killing wounded peo-
ple after ambushing a Cambodian truck 10 miles inside
his country.
In a letter to U.N. secretary general U Thant published
yesterday, Sihanouk said on Dec. 17, a truck carrying 12 Cam-
bodians was halted by an explosion and captured under heavy
fire by grenade launchers and automatic weapons.
He said that Canadian, Indian and Polish observers from
the International Control Commission visited the spot and
saw abandoned grenades and launchers bearing indication
of U.S. origin.
The letter was circulated as a Security Council document
along with the ICC report and 20 photographs of the alleged
evidence.
SEN. MIKE MANSFIELD (D-Mont.) urged the Nixon
administration to send representatives to meet with Fi-
del Castro's regime to seek ways of stopping plane hi-
jackings.
Despite the nonrecognition of Cuba, Mansfield, the Sen-
ate majority leader, said yesterday we could meet with Cas-
tro's representative to find a way to stop the hijackings.
Sen. George D. Aiken (R-Vt.) endorsed Mansfield's pro-
posal and suggested the administration might even go fur-
ther and establish diplomatic relations with Cuba.
He said that presumably an agreement to return hijackers
for prosecution would halt or severely curtail hijackings.
.}i 0
PRESIDENT NIXON and the national Security Coun-
cil met yesterday to confer on the Mideast situation.
No conclusions were announced but officials indicated
that there would be early U.S. backing for big-power peace
efforts.
The prime objective of the meeting was to educate the
members of the National Security Council on the Mideast.
In disclosing last week that the National Security Coun-
cil would devote its meeting to the Mideast, Nixon said there
would be a study of "the entire range of options"at his pro-
posal.
He underscored his concern by saying there is a threat
of a nuclear power confrontation should another Arab-Israeli
war break out.
* . 0
PRESIDENT MOHAMMED AYUB KHAN extended an
olive branch to elements in the antigovernment agitation
that has battered Pakistan.

Khan announced yesterday that he will-shortly invite
representatives of the responsible political parties to -a round-
table discussion for ending the crisis.
He also said, "Whatever can be decided by mutual dis-
cussion, we will have no hesitation accepting."
The crisis has been marked by riots, arson and 31 violent
deaths in the past week.

---m

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