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February 01, 1969 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-02-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Two

'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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,)auucuy I-ebruary I, 19()y

arts festival
The terrible beauty that is ours

music
'U' symphony shines

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By ROBERT LYTLE
America Simultaneous was a beautiful
show last night in the Union Ballroom,
but it became an oppressive, perhaps ter-
rible, beauty. It revealed the orgiastic col-
ors and hypnotic sounds of the American
toy - technology. Using six projectors
and a synchronized sound tape, M o r I e y
Markson created an intense, relentless
collage of images and sounds from our
society.
It began with delicate, intricate
machines twisting out of one color pat-
tern and into another, then to the fairy
'land of an amusement park where giant
ferris wheels and merry-go-rounds arch-
ed six times through more color and light
and sound. There were prismatic reflec-
tions and delicate kalaidoscope patterns.
And always the staccato machine noises.
I don't know exactly when I began to
feel oppressed, perhaps when the screens
began to alternate pure color planes with
the speed of a strobelight. Perhaps when
the images from television and the movies
began to hurtle on and off the screens
but suddenly I was overwhelmed. It

was pointless to try to follow what was
going on: Fred Flintstone, Patti Duke,
Dristan, Spiderman, Double Jeopardy,
cowboys killing cowboys and Indians . .
and a thousand other images (and six
times a thousand). I let my eyes be pulled
where ever the images demanded and let
the rhymic noises set the tempo. In short,
I gave up trying to comprehend and con-
trol and allowed myself to be dominated.
In American Simultaneous, Morley
Markson combined the iconography,of the
Pop artists and superb camera technique
to create an experience that forces a new
consciousness on the viewer - an in-
creased awareness of the sights and
sounds that we walk through every day.
Mr. Markson's work is especially effective
because it is not a message . . . it is
something you experience. 'American Sim-
ultaneous created a new perspective of
our technological society, More accurate-
ly, it pointed out the need for a perspec-
tive-the need to see neon lights and stop
lights and the patterns of headlights as if
for the first time.
The way the film progressed from a

beautiful light show to an oppressive,
deadening ordeal was brilliant. It points
out, not only the beauties, but the poten-
tial horror of the American Toyland. That
we can be (or are) numb to the color
and movement around us, that we accept
and assume it without being aware of it.
For most of us, the world flickers between
black and white with little awareness of
the beauty in between.
When the flickering lights finally faded
and the staccato rhythms slowly wound
down, people kept asking "Is it over?"
"Is this the end?" As I walked out of
the Union the first thing I saw was the
flashing amber caution light on State
street. Then I looked down South U. and
saw the globe lit pathway that leads to
the fairy land of the South U. business
district. No. The show was not over.
Everything was slowed down a bit, seemed
to be in slow motion, but it was all there.
And for those of you who missed the show
last night, its playing out on Stadium by
Arborland any night of the week.

By JIM PETERS
Can a concert whose first half
might just as well not have tak-
en place be salvaged by a great
second half? Can the music of
some grand master work won-
ders? All these exciting ques-
tions and more were answered
Ilast night at the University
Symphony Orchestra'smconcert
in Hill Aud.
Conductor Josef Blatt had the
right 'idea in programming, at
least, for the pre-intermission
section of the concert. He began
with that old crowd-pleaser,
Glinka's "Russian and Lud-
milla Overture."nThis rousing
composition is vibrant enough
to get any audience in a re-
sponsive mood; its familiar
tunes can set a friendly atmos-
phere for a whole evening's
music. But I guess the members
of the Orchestra didn't realize
this.
The timpani and brass drag-
ged the rest of the weakling
orchestra through most of the
exciting parts; and only t h e
tiny sections scored for winds
Iseemed really alive. The Over-
ture was begun with limping
fury; and it's a good thing the
music settled down to the mood
of the musicians, or else their
lack of interest might have
really ruined things.
Schubert symphonies aren't
exactly virtuosi show-pieces.
And it wasn't the fault of the
Orchestra that this piece, his

"Symphony No. 4 in C minor,"
which they played fairly well,
contributed to the irrelevancy
of the concert's first half.
The answer to those ques-
tions I asked above is a big
"yes;" Richard Strauss's third
tone poem "Tod and Verklaer-
ung" was the saviour, And the
credit goes not so much to
Strauss, but the maestro Blatt
and his Symphony. The f o u r
sections of the work -are quite
varied and forming some kind
of unity out of them is a task
they handled well.
I remarked before on Blatt's
fine interpretation when' he
conducted this piece during the
music conference, but this time
the Symphony was really with
him.
Snapping out of its fit of en-
nui, the Orchestra was much
sharper; the ensemble and tim-
ing was there, the control of
melodic lines, the sustained
power. Last night's "Death and
Transfiguration" was superla-
tive.
So the Symphony Orchestra's
name still shines; but if they
would cooperate with the music
a little more often, I wouldn't
have' so many doubt-filled in-
termissions every month.

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THE PAWNBROKER
ROD STEIGER
(Best Actor 1964 Film Festival)
Directed by SibNEY LUMET
NOTE: More seating available
at 7 P.M. showings

4

* 0 8
- * 0
80 - *0 w

DIAL 8-6416

Shows Today at
1-3-5-7-ยง P.M.

See your image--black or white

By BARBARA WEISS
Exploring the realm of drama is an important
part of this year's Creative Arts Festival. Two
promise to be representative examples of current
trends in theatre '69.
"The Believers: The Black Experience in Song"
Is .a musical comedy which combines black his-
tory and jazz in order to portray life in Black
America. Although it is somewhat of a lesson in
Negro history, the underlying approach of "The
Believers" is not one of lecture but of action.
In the case of "The Believers," the medium
is the message. The play employs a blues-gospel-
jazz-pop musical style which effectively replaces
social preaching. As a result, the emotional de-
fenses of the audience are down, and the truth
inherent in word and deed comes clearly through.
Sidney Poitier says of his experience with
"The Believers" that "there's a new p r i d e as
you leave the theatre. That's if you're black. If
you're white, there's a new sensitivity."

Second City is a Chicago repertory company
which creates pointed social commentary out of
actors' wit and audience perceptions. The com-
pany through improvisation of every day events
takes on society - but on its own terms. Sug-
gestions from the audience provide 'material for
the sketches; dramatization is done by the actors
themselves.
The company is well-fitted for the task. Be-
sides being au courant as far as society is con-
cerned, members of the company are noted for
their extraordinary wit and versatility. Some
improvisations which are Second City originals
have provided the impetus for many of today's
brightest comedy groups.
"The Believers" may be seen on Saturday,
February 1 at 8:30 p.m. in Hill Auditorium.
On Monday, February 3, Second City and aud-
ience will give two performances in Trueblood
Auditorium, one at 7:00 p.m. and one at 9:30
pm.m. Admisson is $2.00 for students and $2.50 for
non-students.

The Believers: the Black
experience in song
Hill Aud. 8:30 p.m.
The Life and Death of
Tom Thumb the Great
Angell Hall Foyer
8:00 p.m.
Bang, Bang, You're Dead
Trueblood Aud. 8: 00 ,p.m.

Creative Arts Festival
announces that
Les Levine s
Ehvironment
will be open from 7-8 & 8:30-9:30
P.M. on week days ,and from 1-2
& 2:30-3:30 on Sat. & Sun.

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TONIGHT at
Country Fiddle,
Guitar, and Banjo
1421 Hill St.
put them. 8:30 P.M.
together and you've got
ANDY STEIN and BILL HINKLE
(Brilliant Instrumentalists)
PLAYING MUSIC YOU'VE GOT TO HEAR!

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DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

TAIW

Creative Arts Festival

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
. official publication of the Univer-,
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigahi Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3528 L.S.A. Bldg., before ;
pam. of the day preceding publica-
tion and by 2 p.m. Friday for Sa-
turday and Sunday. General Not-
ices may be published a maxi-
mumtof two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are
not accepted for publication. For
more information phone 764-9270.
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 1
Day Calendar
Michigan Audubon Society Annual
Meeting: Registration: Rackham Am-
phitheater, 8:30 a.m.
Beethoven Piano and Violin Sonatas:
Students of Professor Eugene Bossart
and Angel Reyes: School of Music Re-
cital Hall, 4:30 p.m.
Cinema; -Guild: Bertolucci's Before
the Revolution, Architecture Auditor-
ium, 7:00 and 9:05 p.m.
Swimming: U-M vs. Wisconsin: Matt
MaIn Pool, 7:30 p.m.
University Players (Department of
Speech) - Mack Ower's Bang! Bang!
You're Dead! (Premiere Production):
Trueblood Theater, 8:00 p.m.
Hockey: U-M vs. Minnesota: Coli-
seum, 8;00 p.m.
Chamber Arts Series: Music from
Marlboro, Rudolf Serkin, director,
Rackham Auditorium, 8:30 p.m.
Creative Arts Festival: The Believers:
The Black Experience in Song: H i11
Auditorium, 8:30 p.m.
General Notices
Make-up final examinations for Ger-
man 101, 102, 231, 232, 236 will be given
Tuesday, Rebruary 4, 7:30-9:30 p.m.
Students must get written permission
from their former teachers and regis-
ter in the German Dept. office by
noon, Tuesday, Feb. 4. Examination
rooms will be posted on German Dept.
bulletin board.
Broadcasting Service: WUOM Radio
(91.7 Mc.) 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. daily;
Saturday 12 noon to 11 p.m;;-Sunday
12 Noon to 6p.m.
Saturday 1:00 p.m. The Corporation
in Mid-Century America: "The Power
of the Corporation in the Govern-
mental Process", with U-M Prof. of
economics Daniel Fuseld, and S. H.
(Continued on Page 3)

I

is proud to present

Dr. Benjamin
Spck
speaking a n:
"What's
Happening
in America"

NATONAL 6!NERAL CORP0RATrI
Now Th ru FO EASTERN THEATRES
TUESDAY FOX HILL 6E
375 NoMAPLE RD.-769-1300

Monday to Friday
7 00-9 :20
Saturday & Sunday
1:45-4:15-
6:50-9:10

Saturday and Sunday
BEFORE
THE
REVOLUTION
Dir. B. Bertolucci, 1964
"The experiences of a young
revolutionary idealist: a modern
setting of Stendhal's Charter
House of Parma.
"You 'come out of the theater
elated, restored to their useful
order where all hopes are raised
at once." --Pauline Koel

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"... EXPLOSIVYEL
FUNNY..,
DON'T
WLSSA1i
"FLATmres

I19 i
COMMONWEALTH / a sesi os with
Exactly as presented LIVE on stage in San Francico and Los Angeles!

43

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II 7&9:05
662-8871

75c

SUN., FEB. 2

Hill Auditorium
8:00 P.M.

$1 student

$1.50 non-student

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TICKETS AVAILABLE AT DOOR

.

the mini ad
1965 SUPER HAWK. $300, well taken
care of miles. Will sell to highest
offer by Nov. 1. Andy-761-5930. Z2
with maxi Power!
Michael ! !
(is here)
2 Homecomings are always better than
one! I love you! lap FF
Read and Use DAILY Classifieds

F

I

ARCHITECTURE
AUDITORIUM j_ r ar lsiid
DON'T MISS
1r
JANISIAN
now appearing at
TON ITE "a splendid tine is
and 8 P*M* free eats guaranteed for all"
SUNDAY -s Pepper
ADMISSION $2.00 ($1.50 after second set)

p

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer pesents
the John Frankenheimer-Edward Lewis Production of
the fixer
sarnAlan Bates
co-$tdrring
Dirk Bogarde, Hugh Griffith, Elizabeth Hartman,
Ian Holm, David \X/arner, Carol \X/hite m
-MATURE

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TONIGHT AT 8 P.M.

* STARTS WEDNESDAY *
NOTICE!!! Continuous Showings Daily
Box Office Open 1:15 P.M.

#i

"SHOP ON MAIN STREET"
with IDA KAMINSKA
".. . One of the Fine Films of our time, for all time"
-Judith Crist, New York HERALD TRIBUNE
Admission-75c (UJA Benefit Film)
M a A v A m w 9' ft

PARAMOUNT PICTURIES prrneets
A NB nix
FRANCO ZEFFIRELLI
ROMEO
iJULIET

SHOWINGS
DAILY
1:30
4:00
6:40
9:10

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