100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 30, 1969 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-01-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4

Page Eight,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday Jnarv 30 196

x xur.:xuu . .l ui 441 tI.71 Y ..?V t

.1 ;1

Fred Snowden: Shooting at Stars

Campus
Interviews,
with
'Lockheed- eorgia
Outstanding career opportunities are open at Lockheed-
Georgia for Aeronautical, Civil, Electrical and Mechanical
Engineers. Lockheed-Georgia offers a unique combination
of career opportunity and extra-curricular appeals: con-
venient resort areas, major league baseball, basketball,
soccer, and football, pleasant year-around climate, and
opportunities for post-graduate study.
SEE YOUR COLLEGE PLACEMENT DIRECTOR
FOR AN INTERVIEW ON
JANUARY 31
if an interview is inconvenient at this time, you are invited
to mail your resume to: College Relations Coordinator,
Lockheed-Georgia Company, 2363 Kingston Court, S. E.,
Marietta, Georgia 30060. Lockheed is an equal oppor.
tunity employer.
AIRLIFT CENTER OF THE WORLD
LOCKHEED-GEORGIA
A Division of Lockheed Aircraft Corporation

I

By CHRIS TERAS
Being likeable may be as im-
portant to a basketball coach
as his knowledge of the game.
According to assistant coach Fred
Snowden, coordinator of Michi-
gan's basketball recruiting efforts,1
"Recruiting is a matter of get-
ting a prospect to like the coach-
'es."
The annual scouting program
begins its big push in the fall.
At this time, coachesdissect na-
tionwide reports about high
school cagers.
After careful analysis, question-
naires are sent to approximate-
ly three hundred Seniors to de-
termine their interest in the Uni-
versity. Promising Juniors are
also contacted with University in-
formational material.
No chances are overlooked as
folders are prepared on the most
re oo te Iryconsidered cagers.
Snowden explains, "Recruiting is
a case of luck. You never know
when you are going to come up
with a sleeper."
Snowden and his staff of
George Pomey and Dick Honig
then further investigate especially
attractive prospects, contacting
reliable sources in specific areas
of the country for first-hand in-
formation.
Letters are then sent to play-
ers who have been favorably ap-
praised by the contacts. About
.--ot?.....,. .-. -;::.., .

this time, the staff also decides
which boys will be scouted. Pom-
ey or Honig usually undertake the
scouting missions.
RECRUITERS ARE assigned
to all the schools in a certain
area that happens to be relatively
talent rich in a particular year.
Priority is given to those players
in the designated region who
could best help Michigan's cur-
rent weaknesses, such as defen-
sive-minded centers. But e v e n
before this stage, academic qual-
ifications are checked upon.
Specifically, a scout looks first
for a favorable attitude both on
and off the court. Second, quick-
ness and speed, especially in a
big man, are important. Third is
competitive desire. Snowden stat-
ed, "If a boy has these three at-
tributes, we can teach him the
rest, the overall mechanics and
knowledge of the game.'
When the roster of prospects is
down to about twenty names,
Snowden himself tries to see each
one of them play.
As the list is finalized, one of
the coaches visits the player and
his parents. The first question to
be answered is "Are you inter-
ested in coming to Michigan?"
If not, then "we don't waste any
time." If so, a campus visit may
fBollow.
B'OIlboa rd:r{

SNOIN'DEN HAS o b s e r v e d he cannot be contacted by the
the "Michigan's academic re- school during this time.
putation is no edge in recruiting. Once he has signed the tender
In fact, it may hurt if a player and the National Letter of Intent
is afraid he won't be able to do that goes with it, a boy is com-
the work, but we try to assure him mitted to Michigan The National
that it won't be that hard if he Letter of Intent is an agreement
tries."=
Furthermore, he claimed that including most colleges which
thrhermorehe m that muchdifstipulates that no school will ac-
there is not that much difference cept a player who has signed with
ine what the big schools have to another institution.
offer."
"This is why," he emphasized, At present, the Wolverine _re-
"it is vital that a prospect likes cruiters are down to about twenty
the coaches he meets. If the candidates. Some of the better
coaches cannot make a favorable forwards are Mel David and Ron
impression, both on the boy and : Williams, from New York City,
on his parents, since they often and Jim Brewer from Maywood,
have strong influence, then the Illinois. All are 6'7".
top-flight modern athlete will not Centers are 6'9" Ken Brady
enroll. He must like the coaches." from Flint Central, John Cochard,
Snowden declared the Michigan Detroit Pershing, and Jesse Leor-
policy to be one of honesty on both nard, Natchez, Miss.
sides. "We don't lie. We don't try Guards are 6'4" Eddie Daniels,
to con a boy. We don't make juicy Savannah, Ga., who can also play
promises we aren't going to be able forward, Jeff Dawson, Downer's
to keep." Grove, Ill., and Tom Marsh, from
ALL WE OFFER," he continued, Detroit Northern.
"is an enjoyable basketball career, Even if the Wolverines were to
help in obtaining a degree, and lure all their brightest prospects
guidance into a vocation. Only to the Water Wonderland, Snow-
then is our job complete." den concluded, "we must get the
The final step in signing an top players every year. This is the
athlete is to send him a tender in only way to build. After you have
early Spring. He has ten days to the material, that's it. Then it's
decide, but according to the rules all up to the coaches."

ASSISTANT COACH Fred Snowden (left) heads Basketball
Coach Johnny Orr's recruitment staff. According to Snowden,
successful scouting involves both seeking talented high school
cagers, and selling them to the Michigan's coaching staff.

-7

The I.C.C. Presents

MAN ON THE MOVE:
Cellar dweller Senators mix Lemon sour

I

I nin. T ly o T)iy.il v

The Michigan Lacrosse club is
practicing every Tuesday, Wed-
Spo sStafflnesday, and Thursday in Yost
Field House at 8 p.m. Anyone
interested in joining the club
...:.:. ..::.:should attend.
RENT:STRIKE
Thursday, Jan. 30-Meeting on 4th floor
350 Thompson 7:30 P.M.
Saturday, Feb. 1
Steering Committee Meeting
1532 SAB 1 :00 PM.

WASHINGTON (OP) - Jim Lem-
on was fired yesterday as man-
ager of the Washington Senators.
A club spokesman said Lemon
and club officials were discussing
"the possibility of h i m staying
with the club in. another capa-
city."

No successor to Lemon as man-
ager was named immediately, but
high on the list of speculation
were Bob Kennedy of the Oak-
land Athletics, Sam Mele, form-
er manager; of the Minnesota
Twins, and Eddie Stanky, late of
the Chicago White Sox.
Lemon was booted out of his
job in the very first day after
Minneapolis millionaire Robert
Short took control of the Ameri-
can League club as new owner.
Kennedy, who lifted the Oak-
land team from the cellar' to a
winning season in his first year
as their manager last season, was
reported as No. 1 choice to try to
duplicate the miracle with t h e
struggling Senators.
Even before Lemon's discharge
was announced, Short also intro-
duced the names of Mele, who

League cellar despite boasting the Washington player, he returned to
majors' top home run slugger in the Senators as 'manager after Gil
Frank Howard. Hodges left to join the New York
Short, former owner of the Los Mets.
Angeles Lakers in the National Local newspapers had carried
Basketball Association, took con- reports that Short was expected
trol of the Senators Tuesday upon to fire both Lemop and General
completion of a 9-million dollar Manager George elkirk, but no
sale. . action was arnnounced regarding

40

Kennedy, who previously man-
aged the Chicago Cubs, guided the
young Oakland team from a last-
place heritage to a sixth-place
finish with; an 84-80 record last
season.
Despite his shining record, Ken-'
nedy was fired by the mercurial

Selkirk.
It was understood that Short
had consulted with Selkirk on a
replacement for Lemon, an indica-
tion that .Selkirk is likely to be
retained, at least for the imme-
diate future.
, lki k'r. nU t. r n £4 t U.U n riU

luyWb11l y Ll llu~l'tem r s c o n Lr a c L ex ends
Charles O. Finley, the Athletics through 1970. He has let it be
owner. Kennedy is currently sign- known that he will stick to its
ed as a scout for the St. Louis terms and either continue as gen-
Cardinals. - eral manager of the team, or be
Lemon's contract with the Sen- paid for the remainder of his con-
ators has a year to run. A former tract.

HILL AUDITORIUM

FRIDAY EVENING, FEB. 7

ENDORSED BY:
STUDENT GOV. COUNCIL
GRAD ASSEMBLY
ENGINEERING COUNCIL
CITIZENS FOR NEW POLITICS
NEW DEMOCRATIC
COALITION1
LAWYERS' GUILD
BLACK LAW STUDENTS'
ALLIANCE
RADICAL CAUCUS

SOCIAL WORK STUDENT
UNION
NEW UNIVERSITY
CONFERENCE
STUDENTS CVIL RIGHTS
RESEARCH COMMITTEE
YOUNG DEMOCRATS
STUDENT HOUSING
ADVISORY BOARD
NORTHWOOD-TERRACE
ASSOC.

---.-.- ---- I

managed Minnesota to the pen F
nant in 1966, and Stanky who re-
cently signed to coach a college:F leim n g
team.

title up for bid

I

$2.50---$2.00---$1.50

Lemon was unable to win with
Washington in his rookie year as
manager last season. The team
sank d e e p into the American

Tickets on sale at Hill Aud.
Box Office, 8 A.M.-5 P.M., Feb. 3-7

JIM LEMON

ALL TENANTS ARE URGED TO STRIKE AND JOIN THE
TENANTS UNION--763-3102, 1532 SAB

Z

mL

UNION-LEAGUE

in skating championship
SEATTLE UP) - America's portion of the competition b u t
skaters of tomorrow began a four- Miss Gelderman's lar'ge early ad-
day scramble yesterday f o r na- vantage will be difficult for the
tional figure skating champion- two closest challengers to over-
ships and the biggest prize is the come.
senior ladies title vacated by The girls bidding for the throne
Olympic g o 1 d medalist Peggy left empty w h e n Miss Fleming
Fleming. turned professional will skate fig-
First on ice were the junior la- ures Friday morning and complete
dies, nine future Flemings mostly the competition Saturday night.
around the 16-year age bracket, The chief contenders are expected
and it was Mary Lynn Gelderman to be T i n a Noyes of Colorado
of New York City who took a for- Springs, four times a runner-up
midable lead in the school figures. to Miss Fleming, and 15-year-old
Judges gave her three firsts, a Janet Lynn of Rockford, Ill.
fourth and a fifth. Tim Wood, Olympic silver med-
alist, will begin defense of his sen-
Diane Garia, petite star from ior men's crown Thursday morn-
Los Angeles, was second and Lou- ing with school figures. Stiff
ise Marie Vacca - who beat out challenges are expected in this
Miss Gelderman for the Eastern division from John Misha Petko-
Division crowd, was third. Each' vich of Great Falls, Mont., and
earned one first. Gary Visconti of Detroit. These
The title will not be settled un- two were fifth and sixth, respec-
til Thursday night's free skating tively, in the Olympics.
FLIGHTS TO EUROPE
Fly Boeing 707 Jets
MICHIGAN GRADUATE ASSEMBLY
CALL
665-8489

ON A
FALL ORIENTATION
LEADER INTERVIEW

Feb.

3-11

Sign up
UAC Offices
Second Floor of the Union

1-5 P.M.

I

1207 PACKARD

'

1'y 'f 7
,

Engineers ... would you rather start your career in management and practice engineering
instead of starting in engineering and working up to management? You can, with Charmian
We will interview at the Student Placement Office
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6
BS and MS degrees in ChE, CE, IE, EE, ME, Pulp and Paper Technology, and MBA's
with BS in any technical discipline. For Opportunities in
" MANUFACTURING PLANT MANAGEMENT
* PLANT MAINTENANCE MANAGEMENT
* PROJECT ENGINEERING
* PLANT INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
* PLANT CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
Already 10th largest industry in the U. S., papermaking is exploding with new growth.
And Charmin, as a producer of personal paper products only, is a pace-setter in the seg-
ment that is growing 3 times faster than the total industry!
Charmin's entire operations are alive with new methods, new ideas, new processes, new
product concepts - and Charmin engineers are in the forefront of these developments.
Now, as our marketing area expands beyond 45% of the U. S. population, we need more
engineers capable of bold new thinking.
At Charmin you can expect (1) Substantial responsibility within a short time after you

""

HEALTH SERVICE INFORMATION

University Health Service is now seeing stu-
dents on an appointment basis in an effort
to decrease waiting time and more effi-
ciently schedule doctors' time. A certain
number of appointments will be reserved
each hour for emergency walk-in patients.

For special services or information, call your
Health Service or
Emergencies, any hour

1

ZUt

For appointments call:
No specific doctor
Dr. Robert Anderson
Dr. Thomas Clark
Dr. Max Durfee
Dr. Paul Durkee
Dr. Albert Girz
Dr. Lucile Kuchera

764-8325
or 764-8326
764-8336
764-8338
764-8334
763-0284
763-3144
764-8328

Tuberculosis contact
Dental emergencies
Problems relating to women
students: (Infections, pre-marital
advice, contraceptive advice,
mentsrual problems) o
Problems relative to Male
students: (Infection, pre-marital
advice, contraceptive advice)
Food poisoning, Environmental

763-0284
1 764-8331
764-8335
r 764-8327

own doctor at
764-8320
764-8320
764-8330
764-7385
Male doctor
Female doctor
Female doctor
Female doctor
764-8336
764-7330
764-83V10

I

,AM/)

i',

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan