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January 31, 1969 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-01-31

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Friday, January 31 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Paqe Three

Friday, January 31, 1969 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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STUDENT-WORKER UNITY

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THE PAWNBROKER
ROD STE IGER
(Best Actor 1964 Film Festival)
Directed by SIDNEY LUMET
NOTE: More seating available
at 7 P.M. showings

Suicides
By NICK JANKOWSKI with a t
News Analysis pie then
First of Two Parts a distan
tion was
PRAGUE (CPS)-Two hun- then the
dred thousand people in the safest c
streets of Prague, weeping. Fac- these s
tories shut down. Hunger strikes that all
springing up all over: in Prague, certain,
in Pilsen, in Ostrava, in Gott- often ur
waldow. Emergency sessions of One c
the Central Committee of the out oft
Communist Party, the highest during t
Czechoslovak political body. A are thei
day of national mourning. Stu- operatio
dent demands accepted by the at the n
Government. Onlya
Ten days ago no one foresaw it was a
these happenings. Life went on bility"

enuous smoothness. Peo-
nremembered August as
t black experience; cau-
s the watchword. And
e burnings: Perhaps the
onclusion to draw from
tartling occurrences is
is flux, that change is
often unpredicted and
nexpected.
clear point is emerging
the myriad of activity
the past week: students
majof political force in
n in the country
moment.
a few months ago, when
a "question of responsi-
(as Ivan Reus, vice-

spur Czech

* . * * *1
HELD OVER!!
Ta at 7th Big Week
nfo: 662-6264

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SINGLES

Graduate Party

!

_
______
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i
's
E
.. _____I

SUNDAY, FEB. 2

chairman ofithe Union of Stu-
dents, put it). students would
not demonstrate. Jan Palach, a
21-year-old philosophy student,
brought on the volcanic erup-
tion. His death brought tens of
thousands into the streets. Four
other young people have ap-
parently followed his lead. And
they brought the top govern-
ment officials - Dubcek, Svo-
boda, Cernik, Smrkovsky - in-
to negotiations. Student leaders
are now using their moment of
importance wisely by sharing it:
both student and workers met
with the four government offi-
cials.
This student-worker coalition
again indicates the way to an
external political pressure group.
Czech student leader Michael
Dymacek suggested such a coali-
tion in a television address Jan.
19, when he said, "In the next
two days and in the next weeks
our acts will be an attempt at
a well thought-out, organized
reply that we want to formulate
with the working class."
He continued, "We shall re-
quire, by concrete acts, respect
of all demands, respect of the
will of the whole Czechoslovak
public, respect of our collective
force-because we want to be
equal partners in politics."
With the development of this
pressure, group, students are
most likely going to decide not
to join the National Front at
their Second Annual Congress
in April. Technically,'all organ-
izations are required to belong
to the National Front. Most stu-
dent leaders are opposed to join-
ing ,the Front because they feel
membership would rob them of
their independence.
All forecasts for the future
must be prefaced -by the as-
sumption that the coming weeks
remain calm, that Czechoslo-
vakia does not become another
Hungary. Given that condition
there will probably a period of
reflection and assessment of
the past year's events.
Out of this evaluation will

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graduate council
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""

anger
emerge a heretofore missing
theoretical base, formulated by
the Czechs, for the Czechs. At
the Brno Conference held two
weeks ago for coordination be-
tween Czech and Slovak stu-
dents, the Czech political anal-
ysis recommended "extending
the space between the Russians
and ourselves." At this moment,
they seem to be accomplishing
that feat, most notably through
the recent government promises
to hold Party elections, remove
censorship, and detail the econ-
omic situation of the public.
With a theoretical base,
Czechs will begin to make the
rules for their own game; they
will not find themselves re-
sponding to forces generated by
others.
The past week demonstrated
again the strong weld between
the affairs of students and the
affairs of the country. There is
no dualism between the activity
of those who are students and
those who are not. It is through
this weld that the students are
gaining a large degree of their
strength. Interestingly, t h e
American student movement has
been most successful when it is
also able to perform this fusion.
One of the results of the stu-
dent action may be the decline
and fall of Dubcek. His life was
literally saved by the Czech peo-
ple during August when the
Russians took him at gunpoint
to Moscow. His popularity after
August was fantastic. Some
polls showed 95 per cent of the
population, firmly behind him.
But as the occupation wore on,
as the Russians demanded more
- press censorship, economic
curtailments-so did the people
demand more. They became the
"Second Reality" for Alexander
Dubcek.
Some students were ready to
cast him to the Russians in
November. Since then his sup-
port has not increased. After
Jan Palach's death he issued the
impertinent statement t h a t
"such acts could lead to a cata-
strophic collision."
Dubcek is now being pushed
from behind; he is no longer
leading. Such a situation could
mean several things. If the stu-
dents and the workers continue
to at least tacitly support the
government, the country may be
able to ward off another in-
vasion. If, on the other hand,
Dubcek completely loses the
support of the people, the situ-
ation will be ripe for occupa-
tion.

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jthe
news today
}- The Associaed Press and College Press Service
SECRETARY OF DEFENSE Melvin R. Laird an-
nounced yesterday a high-level review of the Pueblo
affair.
Laird, in his first Pentagon news conference, said the
review will seek to determine whether such espionage mis-
sions should be continued and, if so, how they can be pro-
tected.
"Laird also announced a major review of the $78-billion
defense budget to consider cuts or increases in such pro-
jects as the disputed Sentinel anti-ballistic missile system,
and the Air Force's FB-111 swing-wing bomber and M5A
cargo plane. He gave strong endorsement to the Sentinel
system, tying it to a strong bargaining position in the event
of arms-limitation talks.
THE SECOND FULL scale session of the Vietnam
peace talks ended last night with no sign of progress.
From apparently hardening positions, North Vietnam
and the National Liberation Front rejected U.S. efforts to
begin discussion of military de-escalation. The talks will
formally resume next Thursday.
The day's talks crystallized the differences between the
sides. North Vietnam and the Front made clear they will
not accept division of the talks into military and political
questions. They demanded a "peace cabinet," to replace the
present "puppet" regime in Saigon, so that political matters
may be taken up.
0* 0
A FEDERAL COURT yesterday ruled Mississippi's
program of aid to private schools unconstitutiontal on
racial grounds.
The three-man panel ruled the five-year 'old program
had "fostered the creation of private segregated scho6ls."
They said it had been used to offer "an alternative to white
students seeking to avoid desegregated public schools.
ISRAEL DENIED its jets attacked troops in Jordan
yesterday.
However, authorities in Tel Aviv were reported under
mounting pressure to strike back if any more Jews are hanged
as spies by the Baghdad regime.
The accusations came in a Baghdad radio broadcast
charging that seven Israeli planes struck at Iraqi units east
of the cease-fire line with Jordan. The Israeli denial follow-
ed immediately.
0 0 0
THE HOUSE Ways and Means Committee has sched'
uled a sweeping review of the nation's tax laws.
Hearings expected to last several months are scheduled
to start Feb. 18 with the operations of tax-exempt founda-
tions, already under congressional scrutiny, to be examined
first. For later hearings the committee announced an agenda
including such explosive topics as the oil depletion allowance,
stock options for executives and the use of subsidies and
trusts to reduce income and estate tax.
However, Ways and Means Committee chairman Wilbur
Mills (D-Ark.) cautioned against expecting a radical tax
code revision this year.
"" '' '' "" '' '* ..
THE PUEBLO'S intelligence, officer was called to
testify yesterday before a secret meeting of the court
of inquiry.
Lt. Stephen R. Harris was regarded as a key witness be-
cause of the testimony given last week by the Pueblo's
captan, Cmdr. Lloyd M. Bucher. Bucher told the court Har-
ris was ordered to destroy secret material which eventually
fell into North Korean hands.
* . S
LEFTIST DEMONSTRATIONS took place last night
in Frankfurt against West German Chancellor Kurt Kies-
inger.
Demonstrators pelted his motorcade with rocks and fire-
crackers after screaming the Nazi salute "Seig hell."
Several persons were injured and a number arrested
when police moved in to break up the demonstration by.about
1,000 young people.

11

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Thurs., Fri., Sat., Sun.- 1 :00 P.M., Separate AdmissionE
ANDY WARHOL'S
"THE CHELSEA GIRLS"
(vith dual projection)
"CONSIDERABLE TALENT AND BEAUTY! Warhol is documenting a
sub-species of the New York sensibility that Paddy Chayevsky
only mimicked, that Clifford Odets only hinted at. When the 'Pope'
of Greenwich Village talks about sin and idolatry, when a creature
in drag 'does' Ethel Merman in two of the funniest song numbers
ever-it's time to send the children home and scrap Lillian Hell-
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real. Their party is never over. The 'Pope' character is the closest
thing to the late Lenny Bruce. An extraordinarily sustained slice
of improvisation. Certainly worth a visit if you're interested in life
on this planet.' -Village Voice\
- I

The Fun Place
To Go
Dancing:
Thursday-Friday-
Saturday

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Arbor, Michigan, 420 Maynard St.,
Arbor, Michigan 48104.

Ann
Ann

215 S. Ashley
Downtown

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