100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 29, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-01-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Wednesday, J anuafy 29, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three t

Wednesday, January 29, 1969 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

ATATE
Info: 662-6264

HELD OVER
6th WEEK..

WITHIN DECADE:
Space agency plans exploration
of planets with Mars launching
CAPE KENNEDY, Fla. (A') - launchings to Mars in February In its fiscal 1970 budget, sub- the heavens in such a way that
The space agency plans a vig- and March. mitted earlier this month, the a single spacecraft could f 1 y
orous planetary exploration The extensive 'project might National Aeronautics and Space past all four. Such an alignment
program in t h e next decade, be climaxed by a ground tour of Administration is asking $146.8 will not occur again f o r 179
starting with a pair of Mariner four distant planets with a large million for planetary programs, years.
-mmaredwith $81 R millio i

bad cops
and thoro
cos-and
then~
there'stt

It
tY

TVE IICJEN
AS T>ULTT'
MSUSESTED FOR MATURE AUDIENCES-TECHNICOLOR"FROM WARNER BROS.-SEVEN ARTS
SHOWS AT 1 :00-3:00-5:00-7:00 & 9:15S
A Premiere Production.
BANG!
BANG!.
YOU'RE
DEAD!
by
Mack Owen

i
-THIS WEEK-
Thursday & Friday
BORIS
GUDINOV
Russian, 1954
Mussourgsky's opera with stars
of the Bolshoi Theatre
Saturday & Sunday
BEFORE THE
REVOLUTION
Italian. 1964
The experiences of a young
revolutionary idealist

spacecraft in the late 1970s. The
series could I e a d to eventual
manned flights to these faraway
worlds.
Feb. 23 and March 24 are the
present launch dates for Mari-
ners 6 and 7. With in-flight
steering maneuvers, they are to
fly within 2,000 miles of Mars
between the end of July and
mid-August.
Both are to gather scientific
information and relay television
pictures of the red planet. Scien-
tists hope the photos will reveal
for the first time whether there
is an intelligent pattern to the
dark lines, called canals,ewhich
some astronomers have ob-
served criss-crossing the surface.
Rent your
Roommate with
a Classified Ad

I

the current year.
A total of $45.4 million is al-
loted to two Mars Orbiting Ve-
hicles slated for launching in
1971. This is an increase of $27
million over fiscal 1969 funds
for the project,
These two probes are to orbit
1,000 miles above t h e Martian
surface and help scientists se-
lect suitable landing sites for
two Project Viking payloads
planned for 1973 launches. Forty
million dollars is asked for the
project next year, with the to-
tal cost expected to reach 10
times that figure.
Three million dollars is re-
quested to start development of
a Mariner craft that would
swing by both Venus and Mer-
cury in 1973, snapping pictures
of both planets. The mission is
expected to eventually cost $87
million.
NASA is asking $8 million as
a start for a series of five plane-
tary explorers which would or-
bit Venus and Mars during the
next decade. They would pro-
vide scientific information at a
total runout cost of $133 million.
The grand tour proposal is a
dream scientists have harbored
for years. Between 1977 an d
1979, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus
and Neptune will be lined up in
--4
SA RICIK

No money is requested for the
grand tour in fiscal 1970. Dr.
John Naugle, NASA associate.
administrator for space science
and applications, said such a
mission can not be planned ade-
quately without more informa-
tion on the meteoroid belt be-
yond the orbit of Mars and on
the atmosphere of Jupiter.
Naugle says it is hoped this
information c a n be obtained
from two Pioneer probes sched-
uled for launching into orbit
around the sune in 1972.'
Naugle said several payload
possibilities a r e being studied
for a grand tour. He said 1,600
pounds could be launched by a
Titan 3D-Centaur rocket at a
cost of about one billion dollars.
He said a m u c h larger craft
could be carried by a Saturn 5
using a nuclear-powered upper
stage, but he had no estimate on
the cost of such an ambitious
mission.
"It would take the payload
about 10 years to reach the far-
thest of the four planets, Nep-
tune.
No money is requested in the
budget for manned missions to
the planets. Dr. George Mueller,
NASA associate administrator,
for manned space flight, said,
however, "there have been stud-
ies made of what would be re-
quired to carry out manned pla-
netary expeditions."
Officials said flights to the vi-
cinity of Mars or Venus might
be feasible in the 1980s.
Second Class postage paid at Ann
Arbor, Michigan. 420 Maynard St., Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Published daily Tuesday through
Sunday morning University year. Sub-
scription rates: $9.00 by carrier, $10.00
by mail.

I

the
news today
by T he Associated Press and College Press Service
PRESIDENT NIXON is considering possible U.S.-Sov-
iet Union action to de-escalate'the Middle East crisis and
to limit nuclear arms.
. Concerned that a new eruption of Arab-Israeli warfare
could lead to a confrontation between the nuclear powers,
Nixon said at his news conference Monday that new initiative
is needed to cool off the situation in the Middle East.
Nixon emphasized the importance of settling Middle East-
ern and other outstanding political problems at the same time
as the prospective nuclear arms talks.
The Soviet Union has called for action on both issues also.
The U.S. has stalled the arms talks since last summer because
of the Soviet march into Czechoslovakia.
PAKISTANI TROOPS cracked down yesterday on dis-
orders in Peshawar, near the Khyber Pass, and quiet was
restored quickly according to government officials.
Radio Pakistan said police fired tear gas to disperse a
crowd in Peshawar. The crowd was trying to start a protest
march in defiance of a ban on public gatherings.
The Pakistani government announced that all schools in
Peshawar will be closed indefinitely. Students have* been in
the forefront of months-long demonstrations a ni d rioting
across the country for governmental reforms.
PRESIDENT NIXON told Republican congressional
leaders yesterday that he wants the 10 per cent income
surtax continued, more money to fight crime, and author-
ity to reorganize government agencies.
Senator Everett M. Dirksen of Illinois said that the ad-
ministration's legislative program will probably be in the form
of individual bills accompanied by messages from Nixon out-
lining the reasons for them.
Legislation aimed at crime will get high priority and may
reach Congress later this week.
" . "
SENATE BACKERS of a move to ease the filibuster
rule lost yesterday for the second time this session.
Fifty senators voted to end debate and 42 against - 12
short of the required two-thirds margin to stop debate - on
a rules change that would permit filibusters to be cut off by
a three-fifths majority of the senators voting.
The vote marked the second time in less than two weeks
that reform backers failed to muster the necessary votes to
cut off debate in a rules fight that broke "out shortly after
Congress convened.
* . *
THE SHIFT in the emphasis of the Vietnam war from
the battlefield to the peace table should cause a major
cutback in U.S. arms production this year.
Defense officials say their department's budget projec-
tions through Dcember of this year show a $1,.3 billion drop
in orders for both air and ground ammunition.
Both the halt in the bombing over North Vietnam last
November and a slackening of the ground war in the South
have reduced munition consumption projections from last
year's $7.4 billion level.
SIGNS FOR ANOTHER DEADLOCK in the Vietnam
peace talks emerged yesterday.
A National Liberation Front spokesman has already dis-
missed President Nixon's comment that the talks were off to
a good start and that progress depended upon what the NLF
and North Vietnamese would do in response to U.S. proposals.
Despite American hopes for progress, few on the scene
expected little more than a standoff.
CIVIL RIGHTS LAWYER for the Nixon administra-
tion, Jerris Leonard, has cut ties with two all-white clubs.
Leonard, a long time Wisconsin legislator known for be-
ing favorable to civil rights legislation, is already under fire
for membership in another whites-only organization.
He is expected to face questioning on the issue today
when Senate hearings begin concerning his appontment to
head the Justice Department's civil riglhts enforcement
branch as assistant attorney general.
GROWING SIGNS, yesterday, pointed that conserva-
tive Communist forces, seeking a showdown struggle with
liberal Czech leaders, were trying to discredit Jan Palach's
fire suicide.

Liberal sources said pro-Soviet elements were contending
that Palach was forced to kill himself for propaganda against
the Russian occupation.
One pamphlet, circulated at a recent nmeeting of Com-
munist party members, asserted that Palach intended to use
a special nonlethal fluid, called "cold fire," but someone had
substituted gasoline.

Trueblood Theatre-January 29-February
presented by
Department of Speech-University Players
Department of English-Creative Arts Iestival

I1

NATIONAL GENERAL PICTURES Presents
GREGORY PECK " EVA MARIE SAINT
n a Pakula-MulHganT
Producionof THESTALK NG MUUN
TECHNICOLOR'-PANAVISION'

I

IV

I

BOX OFFICE

TICKETS

Jan. 27, 28-12:30 - 5 p.m. Jan. 29, 30-$1.25-$1.7S
Jan. 29, Feb, 1-12:30-8 p.m. Jan. 31, Feb. 1-$1.75.$2.25
All performances begin at 8:00 p.m.!

.CAMPUS

STARTING
THURSDAY

Tonight-Tonight-Tonight
A NIGHT WITH
CHARLIE CHAPLIN
SHOULDER ARMS-1919
(a hilarious parody of war)
THE GOLD RUSH-1925
(Charlie in the Yukon)
7:00& 9:05 ARCHITECTURE
662-8871 AUDITORIUM
Proceeds from these showings for "Dionysus 69" Defense Fund

Ending Today-
"MARAT DE SADE"
POETRY READING
with
DONALD HALL Poet
TOM SNAPP,
ANDREW CARRIGAN
GUILD HOUSE
I. 802 Monroe
Friday, Jau. 31, 7:30 P.M.
..?<:::::..i..... .. ........y...::;}g.:^.x "xti}r:. "t .:}.;?w"-..:a
i}}??L....... :::k.~.*.*'. . :r*. ;:::................*.."ti: :. .........."......{ .h^:v::i'4".. :"...' }:
CREATIVE ARTS FESTIVAL
PR ESENTS TONIGH T

we

C. FIELDS

w
!F t
*EXPLOSIVELY FUNNY... 4
,I NT MISS IT!" pL A.Times
"NOTNINS LIKE IT INTDW...

RETURNS

I

BLCK POETS FESTIVAL
DUDLEY RANDALL, AHMED ALHAMISI,
NAOMI MOIDGETT, XAVIER NICHOLAS
All poets invited to participate
League Snack Bar 8 P.M.
Admission Free
and
ROBIN KENYATTA AND THE AFRICAN
CONTEMPORARY ENSEMBLE

I

605 E. William
769-1593

//'ube

I

1

i1
f
i
I
I
f
4
,,
j

"TROUBLE IN PARADISE"
DlIRECTOR-LUBITSCH
with Herbert Marshall, Kay Francois

7:30 P.M.
$1--Student

Union Ballroom.
$1.25-Non-Student

ABSOUTELY HILARIOUS !"

Jan. 29-Wed.
75c

8 and
DOWNSTAIRS

10 P.M.

I

"Hollywood Reporter
"DEVASTATING,
SIDE-SPLITTING SATIRE..."
''Coltege dmes "
"RIOTOUS...PENETRATING
IVELY AND F ES..."-Varety
'aK

Everybody's favorite dirty old man is back in town. Putting it
down once more for a whole new generation of potential
Fields' cultists. And a whole generation of devoted Fields'
addicts. Whatever the subject, whatever the treatment, W. C.
Fields' humor is more up-to-date than the hippest of contem-
porary flicks.
Catch "My Little Chickadee" with the incomparable Mae
West. Then see "You Can't Cheat An Honest Man." That's all
it should take to make W. C. your favorite dirty old man, too.
STARTS TOMORROW-3 DAYS ONLY
"MY LITTLE CHICKADEE"
with MAE WEST-7:30
"YOU CAN'T CHEAT AN

This time, everyone with tickets guaranteed admittance

nrmr

I

UNION-LEAGUE
LITTLE CLUB

I

m

OPEN SALES
TICKETS FOR
"CAMELOT"

COLOR

COMMONWEALTH UNITED
PRESENTS

a'

I wl

I

iI

I

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan