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January 28, 1969 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-01-28

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, January '28, 1969

IT'S A ZONE!

The

Kaleidoscope: How it worked

4

By BILL CUSUMANO
"They're in a 1-3-1 zone,I
ZONE !"
Michigan State coach John
Bennington had to yell at sopho-
more guard Rudy Benjamin after
Michigan had sprung a zone de-
fense on the Spartans and jumped
into an early 19-10 lead Saturday.
But neither Benjamin nor the rest
of the State players could be
blamed because the zone was a
totally new weapon for the Wol-
verines.
"We felt we needed a change
after losing," commented Mich-,
igan coach Johnny Orr, and a
pleasant change it turned out to
be. The key to the Wolverines'
75-70 victory was, obviously, the
zone. It was certainly an unex-
pected move, as was evidenced by
the surprise of Benjamin and his
cohorts, and Orr feels that the
surprise was the new defense's
greatest asset. "It completely
eliminated any plans they might
have bad," he commented yester-
day in retrospect. "We got them
out of their patterns."
But the zone had another ad-
vantage besides the element of
surprise. It also enabled the Wol-
verines to bust out quickly on their
fast break.
"The break worked better than
it has in a long time," said Orr.
"It was the best it has been since
the Iowa and Indiana games." The
indication of the effectiveness of
the Michigan break was that Orr
and assistant coach Fred Snowden
could only remember one break
situation that was not capitalized
upon.
The zone that the Wolverines
used was, as Bennington astutely
noted, a 1-3-1. Ken Maxey played
the point position with Bob Sulli-
van and Dan Fife handling the
wing spots. Rudy Tomjanovich pa-
trolled the area between the wings
and Dennis Stewart had the re-
sponsibility of protecting the base-
line.

i

Big Ten Standings

I

Ohio State
Purdue
Iowa
Illinois
MICHIGAN
Mich. State
Northwestern
Indiana
Wisconsin
Minnesota

W
3
3
3
2
3
2
2
1
1
1

L
0
1
1
3
3
3
3
3
4

TP
272
286
349
246
509
383
407
328
284
360

OP
2361
243
315,
233
541
379
414
340
308
406'

the pass to the middle. During all
of this the low man in the zone
continually has to protect the
baseline depending upon which
side the ball is on.
The zone requires a great deal
of movement but the Wolverines
managed it well enough Saturday
to pull out a big victory. Michigan
fans should not expect to see the
zone entirely for the rest of the
season, however. "We did not run
it that well," Orr admitted. "We
only worked on it for about on
hour last Thursday night."
But the change did shock the
Spartans and gave Michigan a
new weapon which their oppo-
nents must now reckon with. "I
still have more confidence in the
man to man and I may never use
the zone that extensively," were
Orr's thoughts on the subject.
That does not mean that the
Wolverine coaching staff will
abandon the zone, though. Com-
menting upon one reporter's de-
scription of the defense as a.
"kaleidoscope" zone, Orr said, "I
like the sound of that." From the
final score he probably liked the!
looks of it too.

I

I .Today's Game
Illinois at Ohio State.7
Zones do not have the action of
a man to man defense and looki
immobile, but this is not so. The
Michigan zone, like any other, is
designed to shift according to the'
offense used against it. For in- ;
stance, should the attacking pat-
tern be in the form of a 1-2-3;
then the zone moves into the same
formation. Since there would now
be two offensive men in the base-
line area but none in the middle,
the center man in the zone must
make a corresponding adjustment
by dropping down low.
"The shifts that the zone makes
actually depend on the placement
of the pivot man," Snowden said.
"When the center plays a high$
post, then the 1-3-1 is used," Orr
continued. "If he pulls out, then
you have to move with him. Each
player has a certain set of rules
that he must follow depending on
the offensive action."
The defensive players have to
move to cut off the passing lanes.
Should the offense use a 1-2-2
and send cutters across the mid-
dle, then the wing men have to
pick up these cutters man to man.
If the offense is in a 1-3-1 situa-
tion and the cutter breaks down
the side of the lane, then the mid-
dIe man must front him as he;
makes that move.,
While all of this is going on the
other defenders also have duties
to perform. The wing men have to
drop into the lane to protect
against lob passes into the low
post while the point man has to
cut off either the outlet pass or

-Daily-Larry Robbins
Stretching for a win
Three hurdlers make a determined effort at the Michigan Relays held last Saturday. There were
no team scores kept, so each of the 600 entries was racing for himself. It was Michigan's first meet
of the season, and the results showed that the Wolverines have some work to do if they want to
win the conference title this year.

*

LISTLESS:

ASMflr CM ST
IDEAL FOR:
FAMILY MEALS, GET TOGETHERS
PICNICS, LATE EVENING SNACKS
Phone your order ahead for
immediate pick-up service
MISTER4
FAMILY RESTAURANT

-Daily-Thomas R. Copi
+ MICHIGAN COACH John Orr
talks over strategy with - his
players during .Saturday's 75-70
victory over Michigan State at
East Lansing. It was State's in-
ability to cope with Orr's 'ka-
leidoscope' zone that gave the
Wolverines the win,

MSU ol
By JIM BERLUCCHI
The Michigan State hockey
team, as usual, wore green jerseys
for 1 a s t weekend's two-game
home'n away series.
But Michigan's floundering icers
looked even greener, as they drop-
ped both games to the high-scor-
ing Spartans, 7-3 and 5-1.
State, usually considered a de-
fensive-minded team, came out
with a bang both nights, scoring
two goals in Friday's first period,
and four tallies in Saturday's
qpening frame.
The Wolverines were able to
keep pace during the first two
periods at East Lansing Friday
night, evening the score at 3-3
going into the final 20 minutes.
THE SPARTANS then unleash-
ed a high - powered attack on

rfense overwhelms lcers

U of Ski Club
SIGN UP TONIGHT FOR
LARN-TO-SKI-DAY/
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 1
and for.
SUGAR LOAF TRIP
FEBRUARY 7-9
MEETING TONIGHT
7:30 TUESDAY, JAN. 28
UNION ROOMS 3R & S

Tigers named top team
after Series comeback

DETROIT (P)-It's been said
that "all good things come to those
who wait." The Detroit Tigers
wanted 23 years for a pennant and
World Series championship and
now the "good things" won't stop
coming.

* Crrency in
COM is devalued.
Help wanted:
How can we protect our
iutomotive investments
on the contine.nt?
Situation: If a member nation of the
Common Market devalues its
currency as the speculators appear
to be betting, other Common
Market nations may follow suit.
Question: Faced with this possibility, could
you develop a plan of action
detailing how we can best protect
our large automotive investments
in each of the member nations?

-Latest honor bestowed on the
world champions came Sunday
when Detroit was named The As-
sociated Press 1968 Team of the
Year.
Although everyone associated
with the team probably had little
doubt which was the "team of
the year," sports writers and
broadcasters made it official by
giving Detroit 553 points, includ-
ing 109 first place votes in nation-
wide, year-end balloting,
Surprisingly, the New York Jets
received only 17 points in the vot-
ing. Their victory in the Super
Bowl over the Baltimore Colts
came in 1969 and therefore was
not considered.
The U.S. Olympic basketball
team was second in the voting
with 96 first place votes and 913
points The Colts were third with
264 points,
bm Rochester, New York
04
SA representative
asm
Jwill-be on
this campus
SJanuary 31

goalie Jim Keough to rack up
three quick goals to put the game
out of reach. '
Wolverine Coach Al Renfrew
then remove the battle-weary
Keough for understudy Bill Busch.
State's Randy Sokell rounded out
the scoring with a power-play goal
against Busch in the final four
minutes.I
The Wolverines' tallies were all
scored in the first period-by Dave
Perrin, Barney Pashak and Paul
Gamsby. That was enough to off-
set the early Spartan barrage, and
give Michigan a temporary 3-21
lead. But the home town Greenies
could not be held in check, and!
the Wolverines returned home on
the short tend of the final 7-3
total.
IN THE OPENING minutes of
Saturday's game, played in Ann
Arbor, the Wolverines looked de-
termined to avoid a repeat of the
previous night's performance. Af-
ter a few furious minutes of heavy
forechecking and alert passing,
however,they slackened notice-
ably.
The eager and opportunistic
Spartans took advantage of every
break, converting Michigan errors
into four big goals in the first
period.
Beleagured by penalties, the
Wolverines managed to post their
first and only goal at 12:05 of the
second period, as Barney Pashak
beat the sprawled Spartan goalie,
Richard Duffet, on a pass from
Brian Slack,
The productive stick of MSU's
Sokoll soon offset the Michigan
tally however, as he scored the
final goal (his third of the series)
three minutes later.
DISAPPOINTED, but not sub-
dued, the capacity crowd at the
Michigan Coliseum released some
frustrations during the second in-
termission. Delighting in the an-
tics of a faulty ice machine, the
fans followed and howled its en-
deavors m o r e enthusiastically
than the previous 40 minutes of
hockey.
Both sides played even hockey
for most of the last two periods.
Several brilliant saves by goalie
Duffet, along with the impenetra-
ble play of the Spartan defense,
thwarted every Michigan threat.

QUITE SIMPLY, the Wolverines ting and aggressive play by both
seemed incapable of scoring. Mich- teams.. Michigan suffered more
igan Coach Renfrew noted, "The from this style .of play, however,
puck takes funny bounces, but you picking up an array of penalties,
have to work hard for your breaks. including a needless two minute
We just couldn't get going. We infraction for too many men on
just' couldn't score." Summing it the ice Saturday night.
up Renfrew admitted, "We just THE TWO LOSSES to State
didn't play well." may have e n d e d Michigan's
It is indisputable however, that chances to capture the WCHA
I the Spartans played solid and championship, but the playoffs to
alert hockey. Renfrew honestly send representatives to the NCAA
appraised their efforts saying, tournament take place at the end
"State checked hard and played of the regular season and the
l well. We gave up a lot of bad
goals, but they took advantage of Wolverines hold a chance at the,
our mistakes." national title higher than the
Both games featured hard hit- league crown.

0*1

-Daily-Larry Robbins
MICHIGAN'S TOM MARRA (5) chaces puck in MSU zone at
State's Bob DeMarco (5), Alan Swanson (12) and goalie Richard
Duffet defend. State swept both games in last weekend's home
and home series.

____ ._.. _..._ _ _ r _
f

A

FRATERNITY

MEN

C
*
'A
0
* -
=

to interview prospective
graduates interested in
career opportunities on
the University staff in
a wide variety of fields
including:
" accounting
" biology & chemistry
research
" business administration
" clinical lab. technology
" data processing
" dietetics
" electronics
t health physics
" medical photography
" medical research
" medical technology
" nursing
" occupational therapy
" pharmacy
" physical therapy
* radiology
" rehabilitation counselor
" secretarial
" social work
" student personnel

Petitions for positions on the Interfraternity Council, 1969-70, are
now available at the l.F.C. offices, 1510 Student Activities Build-
ing, 662-3162.
The following schedule has been established'
SENIOR OFFICES
Petitions due Jan. 30
Election by F.P.A. on Feb. 4, 6

Positions Open :

president
internal vice president

Consideration: Remember the importance of the
Common Market agricultural
agreement concerning price
stabilization, cost considerations
and exchange restrictions. Need
your thoughts on this A.S.A.P.
Thanks.

f

i
* -
'r
C

administrative vice president
external vice president
executive secretary
JUNIOR OFFICES
Petitions due Feb. 4
Interviewing on Feb. 8

there are many
attractive job
openings for
women graduates!
The excellent benefits
program includes a

Positions Open:

academics
Big Ten Information Bureau

I

El -

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