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January 26, 1969 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 1969-01-26

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Page Ter

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, January 26, 1969

'N

/

Text of President Flemings statement

The following is the text of
President R o b b e n Fleming's
statement yesterday concerning
the play, "Dionysus in 69."
"It is an unhappy fact that,
issues unworthy of the attention
they receive often seem to occupy
a disproportionate share of our
time these days. With specific
reference to "Dionysus," I have
the following six comments:
"1. The University of Michigan
is not a sanctuary, therefore the
law applies on campus as well as
in the community, including De-
troit, where "Dionysus" was sched-
uled to be performed on Saturday
night.
"2. Whatever o u r individual
views may be of the type of the-
ater represented by "Dionysus,"

we must recognize that it is re- problem they did not seek. At our4
garded by both academic and pro- invitation these officials sat down
fessional theater people as worthy with 'our people, including those
of serious consideration. This fact from the sponsoring group, and
is reflected both in the reviews of discussed in constructive fashion!

over 20, and the average age of
our graduate students, who make
up 40 per cent of our student
body, is just over 26. They can
hardly be called immature.

such critics as Clive Barnes of the
New York Times (who will lecture
at the University on Sunday af-
ternoon on "Obscenity in the The-
ater"), and by the comments of
our own faculty members with
whom I have discussed the issue.
"3. The human body is hardly
obscene, thus nudity-in and of
itself-is difficult to describe as
obscene. The question is one of
the context within which nudity
occurs.
"4. It is unfair of us to criticize
the local prosecutor and the police
because of a law enforcement

the problems posed by the per- "6. "Dionysus" is being pon-
formance of "Dionysus."' They sored by the University Activities
showed both sympathy and under- Center. This is a responsible stu-
standing for freedom of expression dent organization. The current
in the theater. Naturally, they re- controversy has been discussed by
served the right to make their own the officers with the governing
decisions as to whether the per- boards of both the Michigan Un-
formance violated the law. I may ion and the Michigan League.
or may not agree with their ulti- Both boards have approved the
mate judgment, but I do not pro- engagement. These boards have
pose to criticize them for fulfill- faculty, student, and alumni
ing their obligations under the members.
law. "If, as some of the critics have
"5. A University audience is not said, this type of theater is un-
a juvenile audience. The average utterably boring, it will soon be
age of our undergraduates is just consigned to oblivion."I

_ _.

Hays sees possible language compromise

(C ntinued from Page 1)
disregarded as too demanding for
the current level of public school
instruction. Prof. Michel Benamou
of the Frenich department for-
warded the suggestion four years'
ago in an editorial in The Daily.
However, the 'difficulties it would
entail, 'even including summer
language courses before the fresh-
man year, have generally made it
unacceptable to students as well
as faculty.
Pfof. James iplndin of the Eng-
hsh department; chairman of the
curriculum coimittee, didn't look
upon Smith' proposal too favor-
ably. He challenged granting
credit for cbrses taken outside
the University, although he con-
ceded it was a debatable issue.
Gindn said he favors the pro-
posal made by Prof. William Cres-
sey of the Spanish department at
last week's curriculum committee.
meeting for a "contact" require-
ment.
Te proposal-which Cressey
said he only offered as a sug-
gestion-the detail have not been
worked out-is really an entrance
requirement. Two or three years
of high school language courses
would be required for admission,
but the college would also accept
one year of language instruction
here for students whose high
schools did not offer language
courses.
Cressey emphasized that this is
not just a lowering of the require-
ment, but, a different approach.
First year courses would include
more culture and less grammar,
although he thought that ap-
proach should be followed in first
year courses even under the cur-
rent requirement.
He argued that most defenses
of the language requirement em-
phasize contact with different dis-

ciplines, not necessarily proficien-
cy, for the educated person. He
said he feels one year of contact
is sufficient.
Reportedly Assistant. D e a n
George Anderson, an ex-officio#
member of the curriculum com-
mittee, suggested that proficiency
rather than quantity be made the
criterion. Cressey said he finds
that acceptable, although he would
urge a lower level of proficiency
than is now required-just enough
to insure contact, not necessarily
competence.
Pass-fail for elementary courses
is an old suggestion. Gindin said
it was first proposed by student
members on the curriculum com-
mittee about a year and a half
ago, but that it was seen then as
a partial solution which would on-
ly buy time.
"It would only temper the in-
equities of the current system,"
he said, "not solve them." He
added that this is one proposal
which would probably win com-
mittee approval easily.
Another suggestion, a very old
one, in fact, was also brought up
by students on the committee-
culture or history type courses.
This proposal, however, has not
been considered extensively and
course outlines have not been
worked out.
A similar suggestion was for a
more extensive humanities re-
quirement in place of the language
requirement. Gindin found the
proposal reasonable because of its
"anti-provincial" nature.
If the major defense of the lan-
guage requirement is its counter-
ing effect on the provincialism
'of American students, he said,
then an expanded humanities re-
quirement might be a .suitable
alternative.
Another possibility under serious

consideration is a track] system,
offering students the option of
either a speaking or reading pro-1
ficiency in a foreign language.
Both the French and Spanish
departments are currently running
experimental 200-level courses
along these lines, and "the cur-
riculum committee is interested'
in these experiments," Gindin I
said.
The two experiments, both re-
actions to student pressure for
complete abolition of the require-
ment, take two different routes.'
Spanish offers reading courses
in 232, which is largely reading
anyway, on specific tdpics. This
semester there is a course dealing
with love themes in Spanish and
another on social revolution. Oth-
ers are planned for next semester.
In French, an' actual two-track
system is being tried. In both 2311
and 232, sections are being run.
which specialize in reading and
in speaking.r
Both departments will continue
the experiments at least until next!
semester, barring any quick
change in the requirement by the
faculty. Results are yet to be
analyzed.,
Finally, there is the possibility
of complete abolition of the re-
quirement. The arguments for {
abolition are largely attacks on
the credibility of those in defensej

In any event, Gindin said, the
committee will meet the time-I
table set earlier this year, with a
recommendation for the faculty
by' March 3.
The committee will hold hear-a
ings tomorrow and in two weeks,
Feb. 10. Tomorrow they will hearI
from language department chair-
men and in February they willz
talk with the teaching fellows,
who do almost all of the elemen-
tary level teaching.
That leaves them two and a
half weeks - two Monday meet-
ings - to come up with a propos-
al. Gindin said he thinks that is
enough time.
Also, by the middle of next
month the committee expects to
receive a "rough report" on the
findings of a study they commis-
sioned with the Survey Research
Center of the Institute for Soc-
ial Research. The study, plan-
ned last year and begun in Jan-
uary, will survey the attitudes of
students on campus, especially,
those who have completed the re-
quirement.
A "fine report"; collating the
findings and giving more pre-
cise analyses, may or may not be
ready by March 3.
Gindin said the committee con-
sidered a survey of alumni views
on the significance of the require-
ment last winter, similar to the
survey Prof. Richard Brandt, theI

luterfaith Council for Peace
A DISCUSSION-LECTURE SERIES
TOPURSUEPEACE
- the honest recognition of obstacles4
the ability to.hope and trust
-- the willingness to assume responsibility
PROF. KENNETH BOULDING Monday, Jan. 27, 1969, 8 p.m. First Methodist Church
Institute of Behavioral Science, University of Colorado; formerly of the U. of M. and the Center for Conflict
Resolution. "How Can We Work Effectively for Peace?" A discussion of the relation between the search
for peace and the economic, social, and military structures of our society.
MR. HIBER CONTERIS Monday, February 10, 8 p.m. First Methodist Church
From Uruguay, Mr. Conteris is a graduate of Union Theological Seminary in Buenos Aires. For the past year
and a half he has been in Paris involved with a program concerning economic development in the Third
World. During the summer of 1967 he was one of the most challenging spokesmen from the Third World
who participated in the World Council of Churches' Church and Society meeting in Geneva, Switzerland
rMR. SEYMOUR HERSCH Thursday, Feb. 27, 8 p.m. First Methodist Church
A former Associated Press Pentagon correspondent-former press secretary to Sen. Eugene McCarthy. Mr.
Hersch has done an extensive investigation of chemical-biological warfare research. He will speak on "Chem-
ical-Biological Warfare: America's Hidden Arsenal".
MR. GERARD PIEL, Editor, Scientific American Friday, March 7, 7:30 p.m.
MR. RONALD YOUNG Sunday, March 16,7 p.m.
Director of Youth Work for the Fellowship of Reconciliation, Mr. Young will speak on "Violence: Can it be
used to achieve social justice?"
MR. RICHARD BARNETT Wednesday, March 26, 8 p.m. First Methodist Church
Formerly an official of the State Department and of the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, and
consultant to the Department of Defense; a founder and co-director of the Institute for Policy Studies, auth-
or of the book Intervention and Revolution, 1968.
THE REV. RICHARD NEUHAUS Tuesday, April 15, 8 p.m., First Methodist Church
Pastor of St. John the Evangelist Lutheran Church, Brooklyn, New York; Editor of Una Sancta, a founder and
presently on the steering committee of Clergy and Laymen Concerned About Vietnam. "Conscience and the
Draft."
Arranged by -m---m ------mmmm mmm--m mmmmm
INTERFAITH COUNCIL FOR PEACE REGISTRATION FOR THE SERIES
,U
Office: First Floor, Wesley Foundation $3.00 per person; $5.00 per couple; students $2.00 ;
Tel. 663-1870 * Separate Lectures: $1.00; students 50c
Director: Mrs. Russell Fuller Send registration slip and fee to
Assistant: Michael Donnelly MR. DAVID HOUSEMAN
917 Church Street
CO-CHAIRMEN Ann Arbor, Michigan (04)
Prof. John Bailey Mrs. James Barrabee or register at the door at 7:45 p.m. on Jan27th
Rev. Bartlett Beavin Rev. Erwin Gaedeon
Mrs. Richard Post Rev. Theodore Zerwin a Please register me for the "TO PURSUE PEACE" ;
lecture-discussion series
FOR THE LECTURE SERIES COMMITTEEl e sr
Richard Singleton NAME
This series is being co-sponsored by: : ADDRESS-
Church in Society Dept. of the _
Ann Arbor-Washtenaw Council of Churches -~
and the Ain't. enclosed
EC s
Ec. e icl.am us Ce te -.:...,::.:: m nmm}vm mm ::.vmmK:},<a m r:,}w m i smm mm mmm mm mmmmm minm m i",:;r ,w,,mm
:...........: }i}l:::..N ,. ..., v: : ...} . Y }:n ", .:t" }.
....... ,. : .:::ii}:". i.::... .... . - ., ... ... .... ::::.. .:::..:::::::: "}}:4:4}:^?::::4::L:G{.p>}?::: }?::i^:{ s:^ i"} iu...r....{.......... ."..... . .... .... . .. . .... ... ... nr..... ..... .....v :.n .xv . , n. Y:{..:::: Yl~, 4 ...r }...} }};+, ,.$d:.

4-1

i

of the requirement. These argu- chairman of the philosophy de-
ments may be effective in some partment, cited at the open forumk
ways, as Cressey's proposal tends last Tuesday.
to indicate, but whether they will Brandt briefly described a sur-
succeed in abolishing the require- vey taken of alumni by the cur-
ment is impossible to assess now. riculum committee at the Uni-
The curriculum committee itself versity of Pennsylvania w h I c h
is open to many possible courses showed a general attitude that
of action. Gindin said he has urg- language had done little good.
ed them to "stay loose" in con- Gindin said the plan was then
sidering the proposals, and as far dropped when ISR personnel in-
as can be assessed, they have done dicated the high cost and diffi-
do.j culties of such a survey.

k

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