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January 26, 1969 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1969-01-26

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kary 26, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

cry 26, '1969 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Paqe Three

PN
Sup cpZ
SPOST
+-TEHNE MORN
DIAL 8-6416 ITECHNICOLOR,

FRUSTRATION AND DESIRE
Czech students battle Reality

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""THE LAST LAUGH"
directed by the magnificent
FRIEDRICH MURNAY
A Monument of
German Expressionism
MON DAY, JAN. 27-7:30-9:30
AT THE ARK-1421 HILL

By NICK JANKOWSKI a year ago and making its debut Smrkovsky, one of the eight mem-
College Press service into politics Nov. 17. That day is bers of the Central Committee of
PRAGUE (CPS) - There are remembered in Czechoslovakia as the Czechoslovak Communist Par-
few similarites between the Czech' International Students Day-the ty and a "progressive," was not
student movement and the Move-moment in history the Nazis closed invited to attend the meeting in
mtuentmvAmena.thesMnovear-'the universities 29 years ago. In Kiev between the Committee and
ment in America. There is no war 1968, that day was the inception the Russians. People felt a fore-
have a draft, but it does not bother of a three-day national student boding in the air.
them. Their educational system isstrikeItawas thbytCz fa The motivations for student ac-
archaic, but no one seems to mind. political action by Czech students tion were clear; the methods were
There are strong reasons for drop- intwentyyearsnot. Prague radicals opted for a
ping out of Czech society, but no The reasons for the November mass demonstration through the
one does. strike centered around frustra- streets of Prague, Bratislava, and
The most immediate and sig- ' tion over the country's political other university towns. More con-
nificant reason for these differ- situation and the desire of stu- servativd students hesitated about
ences is the presence of the Rus- dents to do something about it. a demonstration because of the
sians. The reality of that presence Six weeks before that day the warning issued by Dubcek and
pervades every move, every action "Prague Radicals" began planning. fear of confrontation with the
by Czechoslovaks. For some stu- Dissatisfaction with the Dubcek Czech police. They argued that
dents it is cause for action. Most regime had been growing since with a blood bath, the government
recently, it meant suicide by fire August. Students and the general would likely crumble and the Rus-
for Jan Palach. For dthers, it is public were upset over the secret sians would inevitably step in with
reason to remain quiet, to support meetings with the Russians, the their personal replacements. The
"our leaders." The Czech student withholding of information on ne- Prague radicals accepted these
movement vacillates between these gotiations, and the threat of in- objections against a demonstra-
feelings. creased censorship in the press. tion.
Their movement is young, born Others were disturbed t h a t Some neoole were dissatisfied

I +..JVaaac: N--Vv IK4 wGlu Ul.o al olluu

- - with DubcekA and Svoboda. At the
time of the strike a minority stu-
dent faction was pushing for a
public denouncement of these
men. The effort failed to rally
much suppo-t for issuance of a
)declaration, but it did clear the
SATURDAY and SUNDAY wayfora later differentiation be-
tween personalities and issues.
Earlier this year, at the height'
of the Smrkovsky controversy,
Prague radicals concluded that he
Directed by Francois Truffaut, 1964 was not worth a strike. But the
issues underlying his removal were
From the director of The 400 Blows, more important. These issues-the
Shoot The Piano Player, Jules and Jim. clandestine maneuver to oust a
Starring FRANCOISE DORLEAC governmental official and the un-
"Truffaut was born to make films.'' announced agreements with the
-Stanley Kauffman Russians over the management of
7:00 & 9:05 ARCHITECTURE the country-were clearly worth a
7:0& :575c ACIECUEfight.
662-8871 AUDITORIUM s it turned out, "on Jan. 13,
Smrkovskyrvoluntarily accepted a
lower level post, in deference to
DAILY AT a progressive Slovak, Peter Colot-
u- . DIAL ! ka, for the-position of chairman.

JANUARY 26-8:00 P.M.
dd(a9 Fte
Graduates! Enjoy Yourselves!
Meet someone! Meet everyone.
FOLK ENTERTAINER
9 P.M.-JOHN SUNDELL
Pizza-Music-Atmosphere
Graduate Council of

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G~umh~

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"The Best Suspense Western Since'High Noon"
-Los Angeles Herald-Examiner

H illel

1429 Hill

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HELD OVER

6th WEEK

*- 0 0

The movement at that moment
lost its vehicle for protest. But
the fifteen-member student sui-
cide ring became a new vehicle.
I On Nov. 17, during the debate
over the strike versus the demon-
stration, Dubcek had made it quite
clear-as clear as Mayor Daley of
Chicago-that he would not tole-
rate a demonstration. Czech
troops and tanks were surrounding
Prague in preparation for the
demonstration and? for the vio-
lence.
A remarkable characteristic of
the November strike was the rap-
port it developed between students
and the public, the professors, and
the unions. Some of these coope-
rative liaisons have grown into
strong alliances.
As the strike was churning mo-
mentum, the "Action Committee"
doing the organizing was tele-
phoning all over the country, at-
tempting to coordinate the event.
When operators learned that the
Action Committee was on the line
they processed the call free of
charge, wishing them the best of
luck. On the second day of the
strike a cooperative farmers as-
Mark's Coffee House
605 E. William
769-1 593
D.C.M.A.
Jazz Quartet
SUNDAY AFTERNOON
3:30
$1.50 Downstairs

GEN. LUDVIK SVgBODA
sociation brought in 7000 eggs for
the student strikers.
Professors almost unanimously'
backed the strike, at minimum
through silent assension, but often
through participation and leader-
ship. The groovy ones conducted
"anti-seminars." As expected, the
medical school professors and the
aging professors from other de-
partments were reluctant to risk
their positions and their "futures"
through participation in such an
affair. As for administrators, they
do not exist as such in Czecho-
slovak universities; professors di-
vide up the tasks.
Even without ideological fac-
tions, there are clear differences
in approach tactics. Ivan Reus,
vice chairman of the student
Youth Organization, is conserva-
tive by Prague standards. He was
opposed to a demonstration dur-
ing November. He was opposed to
a strike over Smrkovsky. And he
stressed after Jan palach's immo-
lation that he is opposed to open
conflict with the government.
Prague radicals, on the other,
hand, initially argued for a mass
Idemonstration in spite of govern-
ment threats; they were not en-,
thusiastic about Smrkovsky as a
leader, but took strong issue with
the procedure for his removal.
Prague radicals have been active
in the creation of an external
pressure force to push for their
demands; they are opposed to
what they call the "unity of com-
promise."
Czechoslovakia is a small coun-
try, too-smaller than Illinois in
area. Smallness often produces
egocentrism. Czechs thought of
themselves as the "belly button
of the world" between January
and August. "They were the ones
going to the moon," in Kavel
Kovanda's .words. That centricity
vanished after August. Now peo-
ple,-especially students, are going
through a period of reflection and
a looking around.
What tomorrow will bring de-
pends on the strength and deter-
mination of the' new student-
worker-intellectual alliance, on
the middle-of-the-road Czechoslo-
vak government, on the pervading
Russian Reality, and finally, on
the students who have decided to
die. Part of the problem is main-
taining the momentum of the peo-
ple, keeping them from returning
to the apathy common before
January 1968. Jan Palach re'
energized the Czechs for the mo-
ment. For how long.. . no one
knows..
Second Class postage paid at Ann
Arbor, Michigan, 420 Maynard St., Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Published daily Tuesday through
Sunday morning University year. Sub-
scription rates: $9.00 by carrier, $10.00
by mail.

the
news today
b) ,The Associated Press and College Pres Service
EXPANDED PEACE TALKS began yesterday in Paris,
but U.S. proposals to immediately re-establish the de-
militarized zone as a buffer between North and South
Vietnam and to work toward agreement on the withdraw-
al of foreign troops from South Vietnam were rejected by
the Communist delegations.
The National Liberation Front and North Vietnam de-
manded that the Saigon government be replaced by a "peace
government" which would negotiate in Paris for an over-all
peace. They also stated they would accept no settlement in
Vietnam that did not mean a decisive role for the NLF.
An American spokesman said the first session was "just
about what we expected it would be." While the language
sometime sounded harsh, the atmosphere was one of courtesy,
he said.
The peace talks will resume Thursday.
TENS OF THOUSANDS OF CZECHOSLOVAKS turned
out yesterday to watch the funeral procession of Jan Pal-
ach, the student who set himself on fire Jan. 16 to pro-
test the Soviet occupation of his homeland.
Although government officials had fearei, the funeral
would spark a new outburst of anti-Soviet demonstrations,
there were no reports of incidents during 'the 'procession
However, security forces were on full alert as polWemen, ap-
parently under orders to remain inconspicuous, wer stationed
on side streets and in back alleys.
The funeral climaxed a week of tension that began Jan.
16 when Palach poured gasoline over himself 4In Wencelas
Square and set himself on fire.He died last Sund~ay.
Since then, more than half-dozen self--immolation at-
tempts have been reported in Czechoslovakia, Hungary and
Yugoslavia.
HUNDREDS OF NEAPOLITAN STUDENTS rioted and
Naples University was set afire yesterday as students
staged angry 'protests against the Soviet Union to mark
the funeral of Jan Palach, the Czech martyr4. "A
Scores of students and police were injured when the anti-
Soviet demonstration flared into clashes between rightists
and leftists who fought with sticks, stones, cans of burning
gasoline and Molotov cocktails. Several gasoline bombs ex-
ploded inside university buildings driving teachers, students
and administrators from the buildings in panic.
ANGRY MOBS OF PAKISTANIS set fire to govern-
ment buildings, buses and cars yesterday as violent dem-
onstrations against the regime of President Mohammed
Ayub,,Khan continued into their second day.
Defying a government ban on demonstrations, rioters
spread through downtown Karachi, ripping d o w n street
lamps and signs, overturning government vehicles and setting
buildings afire.
Most of the demonstrators were students, angered by the
jailing of opposition political leaders and a crackdown on stu-
dent dissidents.
NORTHERN IRELAND'S GOVERNMENT CRISIS
stirred increasing bitterness yesterday as a powerful sec-
tion of the'ruling Unionist party demanded 'it' resigna-
tion of Prime Minister Terence O'Neill.
O'Neill has come under pressure for his handling of the
nation's civil rights campaign which since October has pro-
duced repeated clashes between reformers and the pollee.
O'Neill is opposed to the campaign's main objective-one-
man, one-vote for local elections.
ELECTORAL COLLEGE REFORM is needed, agree
most Congressional leaders of both parties. But they
remain divided over what changes should be made and
whether any new system can be put into effect before the
1972 presidential election.
Any alteration of the present system would require the
approval of two-thirds of both houses and the ratification of
a constitutional amendment by three-fourths of the states.
Under the present system the candidate receiving the
most popular votes in each state wins its entire electoral
vote. Sen. Hugh Scott (R-Pa.) has proposed an amendment
that would allocate electoral votes by congressional dis-
tricts to the candidate who tops the popular balloting in
each individual district.

THE APOLLO 9 MISSION will be the key test of whe-
ther the United States can successfully land men -on the
moon, the flight commander, Col. James McDivitt, said
yesterday.
The 10-day earth orbit, se't for launching' Feb. 28, will
involve elaborate tests of the Apollo spacecraft and the{

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