100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 25, 1969 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-01-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, January 25, 1969

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, January 25, 1969

WINS SULLIVAN AWARD:

Tankers invite 'outside threat'

Debbie Meyer top amateur in'68

NEW YORK (R) - Debbie Mey-
er, the indomitable spirit of the
U.S. Olympic swimming team in
1968 and a triple gold medal win-
ner, became Friday only the
fourth female in 39 years to win
the Sullivan Award as the out-
standing amateur athlete in the
country.
Miss Meyer. in winning the
award bestowed by the Amateur
Athletic Union, gained the honor
in the closest vote tabulation in
history, edging two other Olym-
pic standouts - discuss thrower
Al Oerter and decathlon star Bill
Toomey.
A 16-year-old high school girl
from Sacramento, Calif., M i s s
Meyer competed at Mexico City
despite illness and achieved a
unique distinction by becoming
the first swimmer ever to win
gold medals in three individual
events.
Miss Meyer won the 200, 400 and
800-meter freestyle races and
added the gold medals to a trophy
case already bulging from h e r
efforts in setting all standard
world freestyle records in races
from 200 to 1,500 meters.
The medals and the records
brought Miss Meyer the A wa rd
named in the memory of James E.
Sullivan, one of the founders of
the AAU, and given to the "ama-
teur athlete who by performance,
example and good influence did
Evmnas i a v

the most to advance the cause of
good sportsmanship during the
year."
Miss Meyer, whose blonde tress-
es no longer are as close cropped
as they were in Mexico City, said!
at her home in Sacramento:
"I'd have to say it's really about
the highest honor I've received."
And she left no doubt about her
immediate goals.
"I hope," she said, "to break
some of the records I broke last
year."
Her coach, Sherman Chavoor,
agreed that Miss Meyer was cap-
able of that and pointed out she
would soon be back in the pool
by pointing at her hair and say-
ing:
"We'll have to get it cut off
pretty soon."
Oerter, of West Islip, N.Y., wonI
the discus at the Mexico C i t y
Olympics, becoming the f i r s t
Olympian to win four consecutive
gold medals in regularly schedul-
ed Summer Games. Toomey took
the gold medal in the decathlon,
always one of the Olympic's gla-
mor events.
In becoming only the fourth fe-
male winner, Miss Meyer joined
swimmer Ann Curtis, 1944: diver
Mrs. Pat McCormick, 1956, and
sprinter Wilma Rudolph. 1960.
Besides Miss Meyer and Miss Cur-
tis, only one other swimmer ever
has won the award-Don Schol-
lander in 1964.

By ROD ROBERT
Most of the good swimmers in
f . the Big Ten this year are either
Wolverines or Hoosiers. So Michi-
gan-s Gus Stager has gone outside
k the conference to meet some
Sworthwhilecompetition besides
the perennial Olympian power-
house at Indiana.
Michigan will face its first non-
league opponent, Southern I111-
nois this afternoon at 3:30 in Matt
Mann Pool. The Salukis finished
15th at the NCAA's a n d could
probably make a respectable show-
ing in the Big Ten. Even the third
and fourth best teams in the con-
{h ference, Michigan State and Wis-
consin, who finished just a few
notches above SIU at the NCAA's,
would have a tough time holding
their own against the Saluki
swimmers.
At first, Coach Stager thought
he could play around with his
line-up. But after looking o v e r
Southern Illinois carefully, he
changed his mind and probably
y will put his swimmers in their reg-
ular spots.
In fact, Stager calls today's con-
test "the second toughest home
meet next to Indiana."
Southern Illinois Coach Ray
Essick believes the Wolverines are
-Daily-Andy sacks favorites largely because of Olym-
olt off the blocks with the gun lan BilJuMahoe. Commenting
ers will get a stiff test from on SIU's prospects, Essick said,
ol. The Salukis from SIU hope "Despite Michigan's talented per-
sonhel, we'll be competitive in ev-
ery race."
FREE STYLE STRENGTH
What probably has Stager wor-
ried' is Southern Illinois' freestyle
strength, both in the sprints and
distance events. SILlt's 400-yard
seaso n freestyle relay finished sixth at
the NCAA's last year and three
In the shorter distances. gridmembers of that team are return-
. George Hoey, Leon Grund-r

-Associated Press

Debbie Meyer

-b

Y

WH Y
Is ULRICH'S Ann Arbor's busiest bookstore ?
THERE must be a GOOD Reason-

1.

Lokenexpects
The Michigan-Western Michi-'
gan gymnastics meet at 1 p.m. in
Kalamazoo today is really no big
thing.
Last year's final score, 187.45 to
66.40 for the Wolverines, indicates
the extent' of the competition the
Michigan team will encounter.
With his team in their third.
season of varsity competition,I
Western'sgymnastics coach Fred
Orlofsky is more optimistic. "We'll
be improved," Orlofsky said. "We'll
have better depth.
"We'll have about 18 on the
squad 'this season while last year
we only had 12. Most of our
strength will be built around soph-
omores."
While the meet may not be

gel to Western;
lo sided meet
particularly fired with competi-
tion, it may be of great impor-
tance. Looking forward to Big Ten
and national competition, Coach;
Loken said, "We'd like to score
between 159 and 160 without tram-
poline since Southern Illinois Uni-
versity scored 157.0 in their vic-
tory against MSU, and Penn State
beat Army with a 160. We want
to do at least as well."
In addition to the varsity meet,
the freshman teams of both
schools will also compete. The
freshmen include all-arounders
Jim Scully and Pete Rogers, Tedi
Marti, Lee Sandler and Paul Kyp-
rie on trampoline, Chuck Weibel
in floor exercise, and two side
horse specialists Ken Saffier and
Dick Kaziny.
These performances have beenE
exceptional in exhibition and it1

RORY MORE, BOB HARMONY, AND GREG ZANN (right to left) b
for the 50-yard freestyle against Indiana. These three Michigan sprint
Southern Illinois' speedsters this afternoon at 3:30 at Matt Mann Po
to do well in the freestyle events in their bid to upset the Wolverines.
MIDWEST COLLEGES COMPETE:
Relays open thincia
By MITCHELL BURKEN rate divisions for freshman and 7
Michigan initiates its indoor varsity competition. The frosh sta
track season tomorrow with the events will be run in the morning, ste
Michigan Relays, playing host to starting at 11. Varsity prelimina- I so
600 competitors representing over ries will be'held in the afternoon, sh
15 colleges of the Midwest. I and the finals will be held in the 1
The relays will be held in sepa- evening at seven. ti
The large number of entries will K.
vary the significance of the meet. Bi
No official team scores will be wh
kept, so individual performances hi
wilbeof prime importance. Wol-
verine Head Coach Dave Martin vi
said, "I'm Just interested in seeing th
how the boys will be doing the first of
time out this year. rn

ein, Sol Espie, and talente
phomore Lorenzo Montgomer
ould also be top competitors.
Highlighting the field compet
on will be Ira Russell and Gar
nickerbocker. Russell holds th
g Ten record in the long juml
hile Knickerbocker holds th
gh jump mark.

dI
ry
a--
ry
he
LP,
he

__S' UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES CENTER
Announces
PETITIONING FOR
SOPH SHOW'69
CHAI RMAN

E
E

The visiting schools will pro-
de some tough competition for
e Wolverine cindermen. Some
the outstanding performers re-
'esenting other schools will be

.1C VA1U111A ullu ,u,., llu U
lj t/ 'will be interesting to see their
Petitions available at UAC Offices, 2nd floor response to a crowd.
Michaigan Union-Petitions due January 26.'h Da Y The varsity should do well, I
udging from performances at the
OPEN TO ALL FRESHMEN 1S f exhibitions. The team ran up over
Spors Stff f a 190 total a week ago and, on I
the whole, looks even better this
week.
TV BFNTAL
*0* Y
1FREE service 0
Ciper mon and delivery
NE .JAC TV RENTALS 662-5671 INDIA ART SHOP O
330.Maynard
SERVING BIG 10 SCHOOLS SINCE 1961 (adjacent to carport) ii
0<-50 ->0< >< <-o<->

Assistant Coach Ken Burnley Herb Washington, Michigan
remarked, "Even though the boys State's exciting freshman sprint-
aren't at their physical peak yet, er; Western Michigan's excellent
I'm confident they'll do just fine." dash man, Tom Randolph; and
The Wolverines will be led by Emmett Taylor, one of the mid-
captain Ron Kutchinski, back west's top quarter-milers, f r o m
from the United States Olym- Ohio University.
pic team in Mexico. Along with All the action will be held in
Tom Kearney and Paul Arm- Yost Field House with it's n e w
strong, the Michigan thinclads rubberized asphalt track. The
have their main strength in the $35,000 improvement will provide
middle distances. Coach Burnley a much better running surface.
said, "Kutchinski will probably
compete in only one or two relays
because he took a training break Texas smashes
after the Olympics."
-....___pr-nt--relay mr

Vern Dasch a n d Bob Schoos
should g i v e the. Saluki's a 1-2
punch in the 200 free, as both
have already done a 1:47.5 this
season. Sprinter Scott Conkel is
Southern Illinois' best in the 50
and 100-yard freestyle. In the lat-
ter event, Conkel has a fast 47.3
clocking.
So Michigan's speedsters, Juan
Bello, 'Bob Kircher, Bob Harmony,
and Greg and Bob have their work
cut out for them.
Distance freestyler Bruce Stein-
er will be bidding for victories In
the 500 and 1000 yard events for
the Salukis. Steiner has already
swum an excellent 5:01 time- in
the 5001yard f r e e this season.
Gary Kinkead is Michigan's only
long distance man who has ap-
preciably bettered that mark this
season.
In the remaining events, Wol-
verine swimmers should be rated
as favorites. Peter Reid, Austra-
lia's individual champion, gives
Southern Illinois strength in the
200-yard IM, but might have to
face Olympian Juan Bello. Tom
Ulrich set a new Saluki record in
the 200-yard backstroke last year,
but he'll be swimming against
Kinkead in the dorsal event.
The Saluki's will also find it
hard to win, the butterfly a n d
breastroke. Michigan's "flyers"'
Lee Bisbee and Tom Arusoo will
be tough to beat, while Canadian
Bill Mahoney is fresh from his
upset victory in the 200 breast
against Indiana.
Coach Stager might stack his
medley relay team. If Gary Kin-
kead, Bill Mahoney, Lee Bisbee,
and Juan Bello all swim the event,
the time should be close to a rec-
ord.

SOb ESPIE

................ .

R&

University Activities Center

announces
Open .Petitioning
SENIOR OFFICERS

HOUSTON {m)-The University
of Texas sprint medley relay team
bettered the world indoor record
yesterday while qualifying for last
night's finals in the federation
national relay championships at
the Astrodome.
Tommy Colgin, Boyd Barnett,
David Matina and Martin Mosely
had a time of 3:22.9 on the new
one-fith mile track. The sprint
medley includes a pair of 220-yard
dashes, 440-yard dash and an
880-yard run.

tF

Petitions can be obtained at UAC offices,
2nd floor, Michigan Union
PETITIONS ARE DUE FEBRUARY 6, 1969

!,

(1

The Sale Is On!
Suits, Sport Coats, Topcoats, Car
Coats, Slacks ..Sweaters reduced
up to .50%.
Group of shoes up to 50% off
Sport shirts savings of 50%

. s S'
N>w

M0

.

Last Day of the
3 Paraphernalia.
Salef
Open 'til 6
Tonight
215 S. State
At

G
0

Swlmig

M
A
1
Z

41

- I
4; //
~~ V

I

Open Monday Evenings

11

II

Ifil

I

r.1

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan