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January 24, 1969 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 1969-01-24

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Page °T om "

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, January 24, 1969

Page Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday, January 24, 1969

RC faculty reaffirms
support of pass-fail

SIT-IN REJECTED:
SGC declines to alter by-lain

1

(Continued from Page 1)
'A', it gets done by some mem-
ber of the staff anyway."
Prof. Sheridan Blau, chairman
of the Pass-Fail Study Commit-
tee, added that "it is unfair to
judgeq RC students on the basis
of verbal evaluations and LSA
students on the basis of grades.
It is inevitable unfair to one side
or the other."
Blau initially suggested t h a t
Residential College instructors at-
tach grades to their written eval-
uations, or ask that LSA appro-
priate proportional scholarship
funds for distribution according to
RC's own criteria.
"Any dogmatic commitment to
a single grading system without
reference to its educational sign-
ificance is foolish", Blau declared,
advising that the RC retain pass-
fail in a limited number of cour-
ses.
Committee member Jeanne
Brockman, '71, objected that the
adoption of a grading system
would compromise the RC's ex-
perimental educational purpose.
"The fact remains", she insist-
ed, "that there are 40okids in this
college who were attracted by
pass-fail. If it were eliminated,
a lot of us would leave RC."
Prof. Alfred Meyer supported
her position. "One of the purposes
of the college is to permit stu-
dents to liberate themselves edu-
cationally," he said.
"I would suggest that after a
student has been here two years,
he should have an automatic pass
option, and that his evaluations

not be entered in the record. A
student will do the work accord
-ing to his own interest and not
because of some arbitrary bureau-
cratic system of measurements.
"We (the faculty) can't alwaysI
be the judge. The grading system
is an indignity to both students
and faculty. I would admit an
exception only where a student's
progress is readily measurable,
suchas language studies."
In response to insistence that
some students' education depends
on the availability of a scholar-
ship, teaching fellow Lois Addison
proposed that funds be solicited
for an RC scholarship fund. She
said that "if we give up pass-fail,
then the legitimacy of the RC as
a more expensive educational al-
ternative to LSA would be elim-
inated."
Dean Robertson pointed out that
standard criteria would also be
necessary for determining schol-
arship recipients even within the
RC. He added, "I can't see why
adding a grade would vitiate a
whole semester's working relation-
ship between student and teach-
er. , We are developing standards
in our students within an imper-
fect world. If this can't be done
without the sinful stamp of an
'A' on the bosom, then it can't
be done without sin."
During the meeting, Blau re-
versed his earlier position. "I've
realized," he said, "that the most
important thing is our relation-
ship with our students. I think
what the students will gain and
what we will gain more than off-
sets our possible, losses.

(Continued from Page 1) to respond soon to these legiti-1
indicate Council opposition to mate demands, he said, most stu-
. dents will probably support a sit-!
changes in the language and dis- in.
tribution requirements, according The legitimacy of any conclus-
to one Council member. ion which might be reached at

The motion, submitted by Bruce
Levine, contended that the faculty
"has no right to impose compul-
sory distribution courses.'

mnaa mass meeting wa ques-
tioned by several Council mem-
bers. "We don't know exactly how
representative of student b o d y
feeling the meeting will be," said

!with the timing of the sit-in.
They feel that all the means for
change within the system have
not yet been exploited.
Gayle Rubin countered by say-
ing all the legal means had al-
readybeen exhausted. "We're not
being unreasonable here," she ar-
gued. "The faculty is the unrea-
sonable one."
"I don't see us doing any harm
to our constituency at all," Koen-
eke said after the meeting. I

Central Student Judiciary
3 seats open
for GRADUATE Students
Sign up for interviews at SGC Offices,
first floor SAB by Tues., Feb. 4th

It charged that since "quiet one member.

I

I '. '. - - - I

pressure has failed to produce a
change in the attitude or policy
of faculty," there remained no

Other representatives disagreed

6

other alternative but to engage in
disruptive activities.
Levine asked for Council sup-
port in order to "further student
control over their own lives."
At-large member Mark Rosen-
baum, in opposing Levine, said he
had been discussing the sit-in
with a random selection of stu-
dents and expressed doubt over
student support for. disruptive ac-
tion at this time.
However, if the faculty refuses
f(

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La dl rd "We have already seen that:
Lan or s pass-fail works in establishing the
kind of educational values we
want," Blau declared. "The rein-
hol d key totroduction of a competitive sys-
tem would destroy these values."
"This college sees itself as a
re n sir. e non-competitive island in a com-
S L petitive world," objected Prof.
Richard Stewart. The RC is not
(Continued from Page 1) about grades or even about pass-
of the strike extend beyond the fail. It is a community of educa-
recruitment of strikers. Legal aid tion in the 'core' courses, and it is
will be an important concern working closely with students.
throughout the strike and a legal "It is not about progress or in-:
defense committee, composed of dividual effort, it is about achieve-
law students, has been formed. ment," he, continued. "The failure
The law students will act as to distinguish the poor achiever
lawyers' aides, do research and is also the failure to distinguish
prepare briefs. Some will be as- those who achieve more."
signed to individual tenants with Blau contested this as "imita-
an eye toward "preventing evic- tion of the outside system," and
tion and avoiding immediate judg- proposed that "at the end of the
ments against a striker." sophomore year, a student's teach-I
So far, the strike committee has ers would simply recommend
counted about 500 pledges, but whether or not a student should:
more have not yet been reported remain."
by organizers. The committee Meyer expressed hope that "we
hopes the number of pledges "to could certify any student who has
rise sharply" in the next week. been here four years, as a studious
In any event, most students and high - achieving individual.
sympathize with the goals of the Our students may have difficulty
strike, according to Stu Katz, in getting into graduate schools.
Grad, a member of the steering "But we should try the experi-
committee. "We're involved in the ment this time, and make it stick!
process of convincing people that by arguing responsibly for it,"
the strike is a low risk, high pow- Meyer said. "The costs must be
ered operation," he says. Many made clear to the students. We:
students apparently fear eviction can make this opportunity avail-
or legal charges if they withhold . able, but they must make the de-
rent, according to Katz. cision to accept it."
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