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January 22, 1969 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-01-22

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Page Iwo

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WednPsdnv lnniinrv 7-7 1 9F9

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'.,A/uric,4ur Ju!rrlu u,v'.LLB 177~

lectures
Voniegut: Humor to cope with suffering

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

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By MARCIA ABRAMSON
If Kurt Vonnegut had not
made it as a writer he could
have been a great comic. The
same wry humor that pervades
his books is the visible essence;
of this whimsical-looking man
with the big mustache.. s.
But beneath the exterior is
the infinite sensitivity and com-
passion that makes Vonnegut
not a comedian buta man who
knows our times well enough
to detest them and move towards
finding a way to preserve man
from the overgrowths of "civil-
ization."
And that was what Vonnegut
and Prof. Marvin Felheim talk-
ed about yesterday noon at Can-
terbury House instead of "The
Paranoid Vision in American
Literature" as scheduled.
After some vague rambling
about Celine and paranoia, Von-
negut brought in his theory that
"humor is a way of coping with
real trouble." Humor comes be-
cause you can do nothing else
but laugh.
This gave Vonnegut the op-
portunity to explain his point in
the terms he knows best. "My
next book,"' he explained, "is a
comedy. It is about the largest

massacre in the history of Eur-
ope."
In his first lecture Vonnegut
called his forthcoming book,
The Slaughterhouse Five, his
masterpiece. The novel takes its
name from the underground
meat locker where Vonnegut
spent the bombing of Dresden.
Vonnegut was a prisoner of
war working in a factory in
Dresden, which was supposedly
a non-target' city and was not
fortified. When Dresden became
an allied target, 135,000 people
died. "More people than at
Hiroshima," Vonnegut said.r
He discounted the calculated,
long-range extermination of the
Nazis, because, like the previous
Writer-in-Residence Jerzy Kos-
inski, Vonnegut realizes that
massacre on such a scale simply
does not register with the mind.'
Vonnegut knows all about the
careful bombing of Dresden, and
he tells it, drily, although under-
neath the steadiness there is an
intensity in his voice that ex-
plains why he said earlier,
"Don't kill. Don't even kill in
self-defense." After Dresden,
Vonnegut found himself unable
to write about what had hap-
pened until 1966, in an intro-

duction to Mother Knight.'
First came a load of high ex-
plosives which provided kindling
and drove the firemen into
shelters. Then a load of a spe-
cial new incendiary. As the little
fires joined and began their
destruction, more explosives
were dropped to keep the fire-
men underground.
After the war, Vonnegut wrote
the Air Force to ask them why.
In 1962, the Air Force finally
sent Vonnegut a response: the
information on Dresden is clas-
sified.
Classified? said Vonnegut.
Classified from whom? The
Germans? They know about it.
The Russians? They probably
know about it too, since they
occupied what was left.
At this point Felheim sym-
pathetically put in that he re-
membered, he had been in 'the
Air Force.
"Oh. Were you on the raid?"
Vonnegut answered immediate-
ly.
He continued, "Today, we'vq
gone on to napalm. I was at
Harvard when they were pro-
testing against some guy from
Dow. He was treated very badly,
I thought.

"But walking through that
crowd was the professor who
invented napalm, and don't
think they didn't know it."
And then Vonnegut raised the
apparently dormant issue of war
research to an audience that
supposedly included the self-
avowed opponents of war in this
society.
"Why is it you guys don't go
after him, the man who invents
the napalm? The Dow recruiter
might as well have been an
usher at the Roxy. Let's go out
and find who's really doing the
bad stuff."
Vonnegut had one other thing
to say, since literary pretenses
had by this time been aban-
doned. He insisted that his gen-
eration is not only the father
of this one, but the brothers
as well. My children have been
with me half my life," he ex-
plained. "Don't think we don't
hate what you do. We've worked
for the machines, too."
Whether Vonnegut is right if
of course another question. Per-
haps what he said unfortunate-
ly applies only to Vonnegut, who
is not a normal member of his
generation.
Incidentally, Vonnegut was

not the entire show. Much credit
should be given to Felheim for
attempting to guide the conver-
sation as scheduled and for
abandoning the attempt when
he realized that Vonnegut had
something else he really wanted
to talk about.
Perhaps it would have been
better if Vonnegut had talked
about the paranoid vision in
American literature, since he
will have other opportunities to
discuss social responsibility and
human ethics. But what he had
to say was worth hearing.
Also, the program schedulers
should be forced to spend an
hour in Canterbury House with
500 other people, half of whom
are carrying around boiling
paper cups of soup. The seating
was totally inadequate, the
acoustics terrible, the room stif-
ling. Vonnegut could certainly
be expected to draw an extreme-
ly large crowd, and other facil-
ities should have been arranged
since Canterbury House was also
conducting its usual noon soup
kitchen.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no edi-
torial responsibility. Notices should
be sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3528 LSA Bldg. before 2 pm.
Friday for Saturday and Sunday.
General Notices may be published a
maximum of two times on request;
Day Calendar items appear once
only, Student organization notices
are not accepted for publication:
For more information call 764-9270.
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22
General Notices
Interdepartmental F'luid Mechanic
Seminar: Prof. Chia-Shun Yih, Er
gineering Mechanics Dept.. Universit
of Michigan, "Proof of the Principlet
Exchange of Stabilities for Taylor Vo
t ices", Wed., Jan. 22, Room 315 We.
Eng. Bldg., 4:00 p.m. (Coffee 3:30 p.m
Room 214 W.E.).
Department of Chemistry: John M
Stoddard, Dept. of Chemistry. Univer
city of Michigan. "Eight-Membere
Cyclic Azo Compounds", Room 13(
Chem. Bldg., 4:00 p.m. .
Department of Zoology Seminar: D
Martin Michener, Shintron Compan;
Cambridge, Massachusetts, "P i g e o
Homing: Pursuit by Plane and Radio
1400 Chemistry Building, 4:00 p.m.
Classical Studies and History Le(
ture, Prof. Sir Ronald Syme, Camde
Prof. of Ancient History, Oxford Uni
versity, England, "Julius Caesai
Drama, Legend, History", Auditoriur
B, Angell Hall, 4:00 p.m.
Comparative Studies in History: Proj
Paul Lucas, washington Universit)
"The Influence of Legal Systems upo7

Economic Developinent: A Comparison Mental Health Research Institute
dofFrance and England, ca. 1700-1840". Seminar, Thursday, Jan. 23. Daniel B.
Wed., Jan. 22. Michigan Room of the j Suits. Dept. of Economics, University
Mich. League. 4:15 p.m. of Michigan: "Economic Analysis and
Botany Seminar: Dr. Otto T. Solbrig. Forecasting: A Look at 1969", R oo m
Dept. of Botany, U. of M. will speak o? 1057, 3:45 p.m. Tea for those attending
"Systematic and Evolutionary Impli- at 3:15 p.m. Room 2059.
cations of Iscenzymes" Wed.. Jan,22,
1969 at 4:15 pm., 1139 Nat. S J. B 2ldg, Broadcasting Service: WUOM R a d i o
Cinema Guild: D. W. Griffith's Or- { 1.7 Mc. 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. daily,
phans of the Storm: Architecture Aud- {Wednesday 11 a.m. The Eleventh
i p torium, 7:00 and 9:0 ~mHour (repeated at 7 p.m.) Ed Burrows
Thet hou Stanley Quartet: Gilbert Ross, tion about the arts and terare.
Violin: Gustave Rosseels, Violin; Ho- Get az uhrtuate onr.
bert Courte, Viola; Jerome Jelinek, Cel- Gut:.Jazz authority Father O'Connor.
10: Rackham Lecture Hall, 8:00 p.m. Wednesday. 1:00 p.m. Latin America
Univrsiy Msicl Soiet ArhurLecture Series - "The Peasant in Latin
Univers sicl Set: A r American Church and Society Today"
Rubinstein, pianist: Special Recital, at with Ivan Illich, founder and Direc-
Hill Auditorium, 8:30 p.m. tor, Intercultural Documentation Cent-
cr. Cuerdnavaca, Mexico; and, E r r 0
n- Day Calendar Wolf. U-M anthropologist. Wednesday
ty a 4:45 pm Campus News, produced by
of ;students in the speech department.
Regents Meeting: Feb. 21. Communi- Wednesday 5:00 p.m. The Press and
Reet'Mein:Fb 1 World :Affairs, with Prof. Ben Yablon-
Stcations for consideration at this meet-
ing must be in the President's hands ky. Wednesday 8:00 p.m. Stanley Quar-
no later than February 6. (Continued on Page 3)
N.
r-( The make-tp exa i conlomics 201

I

Jo
r.
n
C-
n
f.
an

for any student who received an X in
the Fall term and whose absence has
been excused will be given on Tues-
day.mJanuary 28th at 7:30 p.m. in
Room 207 Economics Building. Direct
all inquiries to Mrs. Shulman.
Rhododendron Discussion G r o u p
meeting. U. of M. Botanical Gardens,
Thursday,: Jan. 23, 8 p.m. Public wel-
come.
Department of Chemistry: Dr.' 0.
Bastiansen, University of Oslo, "Elec-
tron Diffraction and Intramolecular
Motion". Thursday, Jan. 23, Room 1300

Rent your
Roommate with
a Classified Ad

S
4,

100- ATTEND:
Students, professors debate
language requirement at Hill

kithen

Chem. Bldg., 8:00 p.m.

Studentsask change
in resources school

U '
i
i

11

Cr Festival

4'i

(Continued from Page 1)
go to the john' and when to put
their heads on the desks," he said.
He accused the faculty of be-
lieving that "given half the
chance, students will ignore class-
es and- required courses."
Levine argued against what he
called the "top-down relationship
between faculty and students,"
and suggested that the faculty try
to "solve educational problems
educationally and not bureaucrat-
ically."
Following Levine, Prof. Lowell
Kelly of the psychology depart-
Healt h service
chan ges polic
Those seemingly endless waits
to see a doctor at Health Service
will be a,, thing of the past if a'
new method of operation is suc-
cessful.
On Jan. 12, Health Service be-
gan' seeing students on an ap-
pointment basis for the first time
since its creation in 1913. Under
ordinary circumstances, a student
should now call Health Service to
make an appointment before go-
ing there for treatment. In the
past, students, simply went to the
center and waited for a doctor on
a first-come, first-served basis.
A number of appointments will
always be kept open for emergency
walk-in cases, however.
General information on. doctors
and appointments is available to
students by calling 764-8230. Ap-
pointments may be made by call-
ing 764-8325.
Something To Swap?
Try oily Classifieds
..S,{"f:e w~ i:.:...vt.. n n . v., . n' 4 .."......

ment spoke at Dean Hays' request
in defense of the requirement.
"There has always been an ap-
prenticeship-type relation be-
tween those who know and those
who don't know," he argued.
"I see this problem as a chal-
lenge' to be creative," Kelly said.
He suggested the creation of an
alternate degree to the existing
bachelor of arts.
"Perhaps we could have another
B.A." he said, "Bachelor of At-
tendance, or B.P.C.-Bachelor of
Personal Choice" if the require-
ments were dropped.
On the less hilosophical side,
Prof. George Piranian of the math
department suggested the estab-
lishment of a bachelor's degree
granted by student organizations
such as SGC.
"Students could meet and de-
cide what requirements they want-
ed for this degree," Piranian ex-
'plained. "Many' have complained
about -the lack of relevance in
their educations," he added. "Let
those with strong feelings about
relevance proopse a degree and in-
stitute it."
In addition to Piranian's pro-
posal, other suggestions were of-
fered in floor debate to solve the
problem. James Noble, '71, sug-
gested the college try an "experi-
ment" in which ten per cent of
the students would be granted
degrees 'without having fulfilled
the language requirement.
"The college could then check
on them ten years later to see
whether the lack of a language
had hurt their careers," he said.
Michael Davis, a teaching fellow
in the philosophy department,
accused faculty members of "un-
dertaking to coerce people with-:
out giving a reason for it. The
faculty has only given very strong
evidence that the system of re-
quirements has failed," Davis
said.

Perhaps the prevailing faculty
attitude toward the matter was
expressed by Prof. Louis Orlin of
the Near Eastern languages de-
partment.
"We must consider the philoso-
phical tradition and intent be-
hind the requirements," Orlin
said. "The study of a language
should make the student some-
thing else besides a provincial.
You must allow us to produce the
best and most creative thoughts
of man."
- -

(Continued from Page 1)
must equip its students to meet
the requirements set by the job
market.
Consequently, faculty agree that
only they have the practical pro-
fessional knowledge to determine
what is necessary for advancement
in the natural resources field,
McCullough says.
McCullough suggests that stu-
dents can best effect change by
offering solutions that would at-
tempt to restructure courses rath-
er than eliminate them. He says
that students might plan changes
which would eliminate redund-
ancy in the curriculum.
Under the present format, for
example, wildlife students take

courses in big game and in up-
land waterfowl. Both courses
study the population dynamics
and ecology of specific animal
.groups, The program could be re-
structured, McCullough suggests,
so that students would cover the
principles in general rather than
in relation to different life forms.
McCullough says the faculty will
not act before receiving recom-
mendations from the students,
however. The guerrilla conserva-
tionists ale expected to present
their demands to the faculty this
week.
The students say they are op-
timistic. But 'Rothenberg believes
the conservationists should have
a plan of retaliation if the de-
mands are not met.

presents
anyone who wan/s to know where 'modern theater is going, will have
to see it."
N. Y. Times,

JANUARY 26 and
8:30 P.M.
Union Ballroom

27

$2 student

$ 3 non-student

READ
BOOKS'
Every
Sunday
inl

Tickets available in Fishbowl and CAF offices, 3rd floor League
SUBSCRIBER TICKETS STILL AVAILABLE

_'i

141
It.GO/ - -
Ma ize!

Airetha Franklin Tickets Still Available in the SAB

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WeN

ave It

ave It!

nil

- _ --

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TONIGHT
HOOT'
Thursday--T-LABS"
A confrontation dialogue-prostand cons
of sensitivity training
FRIDAY and SATURDAY-

1421 Hill St.
8:30 P.M.

4

MON.-FRI.
NOW " -OXZATE RNTHEaTRESiN :091
SHOWING FOX ILL E SATSUN
375 No. MAPLE RD. "769.130(} 2:15-4 ;30-.
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The incredible mind and music of
BOB FRANKE and his
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YeI I IWU S6fl8PIO r

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Ending
Wednesday

-TiMMUM
V--&'7na 1 yj I jag

Dial
8-6416

Mad Marvin Invites
You to Trip with him
Sand his friends
I in his 2nd colossal
laugh program
Thurs., Fri., Sat., Sun.-11:00 P.M.
Vth Forum-separate admission

Christopher
Plummer

Orson
Welles

Lilli
Palmer

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© KING FEATURES SYNDICATE- SUBAFILMS LTD. 1968
IIae BEALBS
New, Albua
Yellow Subxiaartuae

An unsurpassed cast in one
of the great plays of the ages!
OEDIPUS THE KING
A Crossroads Film Production/Universal
Pictures Production
A UNIVERSAL RELEASE * TECHNICOLOR

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Thank you for making last weekend's program No. 1 such a success.
If you missed program No. 1 because of the sold-out shows
be sure to come early for program No. 2-It's equally hilarious.
THE COMEDY GREATS-Program No. 2
W. C. FIELDS-"The Pharmacist"
LAUREL & HARDY-"Double Whoopeee" a really great one featuring an appear-
ance by JEAN HARLOW.
CHARLIE CHAPLIN-"Easy Street" The best knowns of his Mutual Series, a sub-

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INTRODUCTORY PRICE
A149,

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