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January 21, 1969 - Image 10

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-01-21

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Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, January 21, 1969

Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, January 21, 1969

ORWARD TOGETHER':

Yixon inaugurated-
imid sporadic demo
(continued from Page 1) Paratroopers were rushed into;
overnment will listen," Nixon the streets to form a second line
nised. "For all of our people, behind the police as Nixon ap-
will set as our goal the decent proached. Three smoke bombs and
r that makes progress possible a firecracker sailed over the cor-
our lives secure. don into the ranks of the Marine
he angry clashes which mark- band and other units preceding
he parade ceremonies came in the President.

G
r'

arp counterpoint to Nixon's in-
gural theme of "Forward To-
her." Most of the arrests were
disorderly conduct but two
)ple were charged with burning
American flag and one with
ault on an officer.
The antiwar outbursts at the
i m a x of the first mass
tuguration day demonstrations
the nation's history. And they
irred massive security arrange-
nts much tighter than in past
auguration rituals.
Police, pummeling protesters
th nightsticks, repulsed a
arge against the cordon guard-
, the inaugural parade about
minutes before Nixon passed
his triumphant procession from
e Capitol to the White House.

USSR: Size, high expectatios SPANISH LECTURE
Presid~en Dntioeenl -adelcneio
leave actual achievement bel nd J e
' IDr. Fritz Schalk
n SI ( ] By MICHAEL JOHNSON A restaurant built into the Os- descendant of the Maxim Gor- .k
Associated Press Writer tankino television tower, to pro- ky, an eight-engine monster built roftssr RoUlfd/I C !.dfuL. ar s
MOSCOW (P) - Soviet super- vide a panoramic view of Moscow in 1933 and advertised then as the Unit 'rsI/0 o c;olIg(e
"Ho, Ho, Ho Chi Minh, the latives are running into a law of often finds itself in the clouds. It biggest in the world. It blew up
NLF is going to win," the pro- diminishing deturns. makes for eerie dining, but likely in flight, killing everybody aboard. TUESDA Y, JANUARY 21 West Conference Room
testers shouted.theaRussian people are ambi- no view, day or night, from the Moscow itself was laid out by :001 P.. Rackam Building
The National Liberation Front tious and prestige-conscious. They men with big ideas. The Garden
NLF is a formal name for V i e t like to think and build on a The AN22 turboprop plane, first Ring street circling the business - - -
Cong, whose flags the protesters grand scale. made public in Paris in June, district is so wide in some places -- - -- -- ___-
carried. But the lure of sheer size has 1965, was designed to carry 724 it can be crossed only in two cy-
run into pitfalls on several pro- persons. The prototype was billed cles of the stoplight.
Washington National Guardsmen jects recently. e-as the world's largest, but the Intourist. the travel agency that
backed up by 82nd Airborne Di- Russian history is full of ex- plane never has appeared for pas- handles foreigners, is quick to
vision paratroopers from Ft amples of official efforts to im- senger or cargo use. remind visitors of various Soviet NNOUNCES
Bragg, N.C., guarded the inaug press people, especially foreigners, The AN22 apparently was a firsts, bests and mosts UNION-LEAGUE
urto'ndprd.with showcase projects. The So- I____.
uration and parade. iets have carried on the tradition, PETITIONING FOR THE CHAIRMAN
The chants of invective and ob- sometimes with greater enthus-
scenity often were .drowned out iasm than their prerevolutionary
by cheers for Nixon ancestors.te p v in
anetr.Attention 16 u m rBusFsia
The antiwar demonstrators who A new 4,000-room hotel in Mos-19S m mer Blues Fes J g Ua I
spread through the streets after cow is so huge that tourists are The Michigan
Nixon passed never succeeded in constantly getting lost in it. A Doil displa A Completely New Midwest Festival
getting within a block of the pre- reporter who showed up there for
sidential reviewing stand at the a late-night appointment found adv. staff
White House. his host's room empty. He de- is looking for unuali- Petitions can be picked up of the
Denied the target of their fury, ;cended to the lobby on the op- fied, inexperienced per- UACoffices, 2nd floor Michigan Union
they milled through the down- posite side of the hotel - a 20- sonnelI g
town area with occasional win- minute walk, one-way - andf"
dow cracking. Police moved with came right back. By the time he ifyou fill the qualifications PETITIONS ARE DUE JANUARY 26
their march and continued the returned to the room his host call 764-0554 for appointment
scattered arrests. was asleep. ~~-=~=~__~

4

A band of antiwar protesters
surrounded three isolated police-
men and attacked them. Police
beat one youth to his knees, and
demonstrators threw rocks at
police.
The running melee through the
streets of Washington came after
a march by 5,000 to 10,000 persons
on the Capitol Sunday to pro-
test the war in Vietnam.
Demonstrators brandished t h e
same orange banners yesterday
mocking Nixon's campaign slogan
with the phrase "Nixon's the One
-No. 1 War Criminal."
They chanted obscenities at
Vice President Spiro T. Agnew
and Gov. George Romney, now a
member of Nixon's cabinet.

,__

i

Opportunities

for

Growth

In

Religious

Understanding

GUILD HOUSE
802 MON ROE
NOON LUNCHEONS 12:00-12:55
BUFFET-25c
with speakers on relevant themes
Mondays, Tuesdays,,Fridays'
(Watch Daily and posters for announcement)
Friday Evening Dinners-6:00 P.M.
International cuisine
GUILD HOUSE OPEN DAILY--8:00 a.m.-1 :00 a.m.
Hi-Fi, Grand Piano, Coffee
Counseling
ECUMENICAL CAMPUS CENTER
921 Church St.;
TUESDAY--International Center, 603 E. Madison
A Noon Luncheon-Discussion. Analysis of world issues from
the perspectives of international students and scholars.
THURSDAY-Ecumenical Campus Center, 921 Church
" Noon Luncheon-Discussion beginning February 6 on "THE
ROOTS OF PREJUDICE." An examination of prejudice as it
is expressed racially, religiously dnd ideologically.
' 7:30 P.M.-a film series on "THE RELIGIONS OF MAN,"
beginning January 23.
FRIDAY-Curtis Room, First Presbyterian Church
* 7:30 P.M.-four part series on NEGRO LIFE AND CULTURE
led by Eugene McCoy, school principal in Batt 9Creek.
For further information about these programs, call 662-5529

Many opportunities are provided within the University commu-
nity for growth in knowledge of one's own faith and in an under-
standing of the religious life of others.
In addition t' seminars and lectures sponsored by the Office of
Religious Affairs, study programs are offered through the more than
33 religious centers and are open to all interested persons. Some of
the programs for the Winter Term are announced on this page. Par-
ticipation in these studies can be of great assistance in relating reli-
gion to contemporary issues and in correlating religious thought with
other disciplines.
Courses about religion are provided by several University depart-
ments. For a listing, consult the section on "Studies, in Religion" in
the catalog of the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.
-The Office of Religious Affairs
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
ALFRED T. SCHEIPS, Pastor
Phones: 663-5560 & 668-8720
Monday evenings at 8:00 o'clock: Course in "Christian
Theology" with emphasis on doctrines and practices
of major Christian groups. The Rev. Alfred T.
Scheips, Instructor
Sunday morning: Class on "Contemporary Theological
Issues," rreets at 9:30 and 11:00, alternating Sun-
days. Judy Koucky, Leader

UNIVERSITY FELLOWSHIPr
HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
Meeting Sundays temporarily in Ann Arbor "Y"
Bunlding under construction on Glacier Way, NC
9:30 A.M. Coffee.
9:45 A.M. Open, frank, study-discussion in the Gospel of Luke:
"Jesus of Nazareth as Seen thru the Eyes of a First Century
Scientist."
9:45 A.M. Stimulating Bible discussions in Young Married Couples
Class.
11:00 A.M. Morning Worship Hour.
7:00 P.M. Evening Service with variety in format and personnel.
Coming weeks to include a film series, "The Religions of
Man," at 6:00 or 7:00 P.M. in area homes.
in area homes.
8:30 P.M. Campus & Careers informal 'fellowship with refreshments
Phone Rev. Charles Johnson, 761-6749, for further information
and/or transportation.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw-1/2 block north of U Towers
Donald Postema, Pastor
WORSHIP-10:00 A.M. and 5:00 P.M. each Sunday.
Holy Communion celebrated first Sunday evening of
the month.
The chapel is open all day and night for meditation.
The lounge is open 8 A.M.-11 P.M. for study and
relaxation.
DISCUSSIONS on social and theological issues:
Jan. 25, 26-Retreat. Topic: "Education and the
Secularization of the Christian Faith"
U of M Fresh-Air Camp
6:00 P.M. Sundays (includes supper)
Feb. 2-"Social Ministry"-"Evangelism?"
Feb. 1 6-"Crises in Black and White"-study
of current literature on the racial situation
March 9--"The Price of Involvement"
March 1 6-"Existentialism"
ACTION-opportunities for social action such as tutor-
ing, youth group work, etc. Call 668-7421.
FEBRUARY 21-SQUARE DANCE with "Shorty" Hof-
meyer.

Lutheran Student Chapel and Center
801 S. Forest at Hill St.
Phone 668-7622
DONALD G. ZILL, Pastor
WINTER TERM SEMINARS . . .
SERIES A: 1. "THE MAN FOR OTHERS: RECENT THEOLOGI-
CAL THOUGHT ABOUT CHRIST"
Wed. afternoons, 4:00-5:00, Jan. 22-Feb. 19
Instructor: The Rev. Wilson Kotchenruther, Assoc.
Pastor, Emmanuel Luth. Ch., Ypsilanti' (Gradu-
ate work in theology at Univ. of Hamburg)
2. "THE ETHICS OF DISSENT"
Sun. mornings, 9:30-10:30, Jan. 26-Feb. 23
Instructor: Dr. Paul Kauper, Professor of Law
SERIES B.: 1. "THE STEWARDSHIP OF ENVIRONMENT"
Wed. afternoons, 4:00-5:00, March 12-April,9
Instructor: Dr. A. Nelson Dingle, Professor of Me-
teorology.
2. "BIBLICAL STUDY: A NEW APPROACH"
Sun. mornings, 9:30-10:30, March 16-April 13
Instructor: Miss Roberto Purdon, Lab Technician,
Parke-Davis.
GOD IS LOVE
Seminars are open to all who desire to attend!
A true understanding of God is available to us every day, and everyone
has, here and now, the opportunity to know and to prove in his or her
life the presence of good and the power of God. At each meeting of
the Christian Science Organization,.testimonies can be heard which
relate the teachings of Christ Jesus, and their present application, to
all problems and to every need. We find that a knowledge of the
truth of man brings to destruction every kind of fear, reveals our real
identity, and daily re-adjusts our lives toward more excitement, joy,
health, and harmony. You are welcome to join with us in a growing
awareness and practical demonstration of the ever-present power of
divine Love.
Consider these seven synonyms for God explored in Christian Science:

#1

WESLEY FOUNDATION

Corner of State and Huron

668-6881

MIND

TRUTH
LOVE

SPIRIT
PRINCIPLE

SOUL

NOON DISCUSSION GROUPS (beginning week of Jcn.
20 and running for 6-8 weeks):
12-1 P.M. 25c for lunch
TUESDAY-"Are the Arabs and Israelis Pawns in
the East-West Conflict?",
-Rev. Bartlett Beavin
WEDNESDAY-"The World at Our Doorstep"-A
look at Africa, India, Latin America and the
Far East
-Rev. William Lutz
FRIDAY-"Encounters Necessary When in Mission"
-Rev. Bartlett Beavin
HOLY COMMUNION - (Wednesdays beginning Jan.
22) : 7 A.M. with breakfast, out by 8 A.M.
JANUARY 31-FEBRUARY 2, 1969
Winter Retreat with Professor Leroy Augenstein of
MSU Biophysics Dept. He will be dealing with the
ethical decisions necessary in light of modern medi-
cal phenomenon. For further details contact Wesley
Office.

Friday

12 noon

Michigan Union

LIFE

(through doors along south side of basement cafeteria)

The CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION meets on every Thursday
evening at 7:30 in room 3545 of the SAB.
The, Christian Science Church is located at 1833 Washtenaw. There,
Sunday morning services are held at 10:30, and Wednesday evening
testimony meetings at 8:00.
The Christian Science Reading Room at 306 East Liberty, is the place
to go for individual study and more information. A copy of the Chris-
tian Science textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures
by Mary Baker Eddy, and other literature, can be found in the Religious
Affairs Library-on the 2nd floor, of the SA'B.
You are invited to attend a lecture on Christian Science entitled
"Freedom and True Identity" to be given by Edward C. Williams, on
Friday, February 14, in the UGLI Multipurpose Room at 8:00 p.m.

CAMPUS ISSUES LUNCHEON

Discussion With

JANUARY

JOHN L. CASH, Coordinator of Human Relations, Pro-
grams, Office of the President
January 31-
RONALD THOMPSON, Black Student Union
Discussions free and open to the public-
Bring your lunch or buy your lunch here
Office of Student Organizations, 1011 S.A.B.
Office of Religious Affairs, 2282 S.A.B.

NEWMAN CLASS PROGRAM
WINTER SEMESTER, 1969
CLASSES BEGIN WEEK OF JANUARY 20-REGISTRATION AT FIRST CLASS
THEOLOGY AND SCRIPTURE

i

THE RELIGIONS
OF MAN-

100 FUNDAMENTALS OF CATHOLIC CHRISTIANITY. De-
signed as a basic survey course in Roman Catholic doc-
trine and practice for prospective converts and those
contemplating marriage to -a Catholic, Those who are
merely curious to know what the Catholic Church is all
about are particularly welcome.
Instructors: Fr. John J. Fauser Time: Monday and Thurs.
Fr. Charles Irvin 4:00 or 7:00 p.m.
Length of Course: 12 weeks,
101 CONTEMPORARY .ISSUES IN THEOLOGY. An investiga-
tion of freedom and authority, faith and intellectual hon-
esty, secularization and the value of human endeavor, the
dynamics of prejudice, the quest for dialogue. Recom-
mended to those who have had Theology 100 or equiva-
lent..
Instructor: Fr. William Hutchenson, S.J.
Length of Course: 12 weeks Time: Monday, 8:00 p.m.

A National Educational Television
series prepared under the direction
of Huston Smith, Professor of Phil-
osophy, M.I.T.; author of The Re-
ligions of Mon.
Jan. 21-26
Relevance of the Religions of
Hinduism: Part 1

Mar. 11-16
Judaism: Part 1
Judaism: Part 2
Mar. 18-23
Christianity: Part']
Christianity: Part 2
Mar. 25-30
Christianity: Part 3
"Final Examination"

PERSPECTIVES ON
WORLD RELIGIONS
A series of Wednesday noon book- Director Zen Mediation Center,
discussion luncheons is being Rochester, New York,
planned by the Office of Religious
Affairs for March 12, 19, 26, and J. M. LOCHMAN March 23-25
April 2. Books to be reviewed and Professor of Theology, Comenius
discussed will present the varied Faculty University of Prague; Vis-
views on world religions of several iting Professor, Union Theological

pastoral foundations of Christian communities. Focuses on
practical ways in whicheach member can contribute to
each of their living situations (family, friends, dorm,
apartment, random contacts) becoming more of a Chris-
tian community.
Instructor: Mr. Ralph Martin
Length of Course: 8 weeks Time: Tuesday, 8:00 p.m.
203 PEACE-IN CHRIST. A seminar designed to explore the
foundations for Christian peace Pacem in Terris and other
texts will be used in discussion.
Instructors: Misses Mary Ann Hazen and Lucy Smeltzer
Length of Course: 8 weeksT:
Time: Wednesday, 8:00 p~m.
204 PSYCHOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS OF MORAL LIVING.
An introductory seminar investigating the bases of Chris-
tian sexual-morality in the light of modern psychology. An
analysis of the nature of sin, human freedom, responsi-
bility. Special attention is given to the problem of mastur-
bation, homosexuality, and premarital sex.
Instructor: Fr. Michael Donovan
Length of Course: 12 weeks Time:,Tuesday, 8:00 p.m.
301 EASTERN RELIGIONS. Basic orientation of Hinduism,
Buddism, Confucianism, and Taoism seen in relation-to
Christianity.
Instructor:.Sister Constance
Length of Course: 10 weeks Time: Thursday, 7:00 p.m.
302 THEOLOGY AND LITERATURE. A consideration of the
theological implications of basic themes in modern 'lit-
erature.

01

102 LIVING THE MESSAGE OF CHRIST. Many people know
a lot about religion from an intellectual point of view. Not
many have had much direction on how to make it a vital
power in their lives. A workshop rather than a course, it
deals with how to live a life contract with God and com-
munity. Led by four young laymen engaged full time in
the Christian Apostolate. Highly recommended to all.
Instructors: Messrs. Jim Cavnar, Gerry Rauch, Steve
Kirlin, Miss Patti Gallagher
Length of Course: 8 weeks Time: Tuesdays, 8:00 p.m.
200 SACRED SCRIPTURE. Liturgical themes and the Eucharis-
tic celebration in the Gospel of John. A study of John 6-21

Jan. 28-Feb.
Hinduism:I

Part 2

1 Tha mi-inva liStArl films will be

Hinduism: Prn 3 I"it U.O~oveitseaT m WllD

U

I!

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