100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 21, 1969 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-01-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY''

Tuesday, January 21, 1969

'Page Eight THE MICH!GAN DAILY Tuesday, January 21, 1969

Howe leads Eastern All-Stars
against West's net-minding duo

i
I
f
E
F
i
t

Icers find skating hard in great divide

By ELLIOTT BERRY

By The Associated Press
Detroit's great Gordie Howe,
making his 20th All-Star appear-
ance, leads the Eastern Division
against the West tonight in the
NHL All-Star gane at Montreal.
The West features St. Louis
goalies Jacques Plante and Glenn
Hall-two of the best in NHL his-
tory.
The game, which begins at 8
p.m., will be televised on Chan-
nel 9.
Splitting the goaltending chores
between them, Hall and Plante
have opened a wide lead in the
race for the Vezina Trophy. Their
88 goals allowed is 24 less than
any other team in the league.
Prior to Tuesday's game, the
formula has been for the defend-
ing Stanley Cup champions to take
on a team of All Stars chosen from
the other clubs. This year marks
the first time the players will be
paid for participating, with $500
going to each member of the win-
ning squad and $250 to each on
the losing side.
Of the 19 players scheduled to
appear for each side, only one will
likely miss the affair, although
one other may see only limited
action.
Pat Stapleton, the Chicago de-
fenseman, wil be missing from
Coach Toe Blake's East line-up
because of a recurring eye prob-
lem.
Stapleton was struck in the eye
by a stick recently and will remain
in Chicago for further examina-
tion and -treatment of resulting
double vision. An NHL spokesman
said Monday that no replacement
has been called.
Tommy Ivan, Chicago general
manager, said that Bobby Hull, a
unanimous choice for the left
wing position on the Eastern team,
will play.
Hull has been hampered for the

Mountains-the objects of phi-
losophers' dreams and athletes'
nightmares.
Falling into the second of the
above categories, the Wolverine
icers who traveled to Colorado
Springs last weekend for a two
gane. series with lowly Colorado
College, did indeed find the lofty
heights of the Rockies somewhat
of a nightmare as they struggled
for a split.
Coming to Colorado equipped
with their own supply of oxygen
but seemingly little else, the Wol-
verines gasped to a 6-4 victory
Friday night in a game which
Michigan coach Al Renfrew called
"our poorest effort of the season."
Following the same baffling
pattern of the Denver series the
week before, the Wolverines won
the opener despite playing poorly.
However, they came out on the
short end of a 5-4 score on Satur-
day even though their play showed
marked improvement.
While a split with Denver, often
regarded as the league's finest
team, was satisfactory to the Wol-
verines, the split with 7th place
Colorado College was acceptable
to none of them. High scoring left-
winger Dave Perrin moaned, "We
played terrible in both games, the
whole team."
While not looking at things
quite so bleakly as Perrin, Ren-
frew's assessment of Friday's play
was hardly very cheerful. "We just
weren't playing hockey but for-
tunately we did take advantage
of the chances that presented
themselves."
Nothing illustrated this fact
more than the statistic showing
the Wolverines scoring on its only
shot on net in the first period.
The heroes of Friday's contest
were sophomore forward Brian

Gordie Howe

last month by a fractured jaw, an
injury that required his teeth to
be wired together. As a result, he
has been unable to eat solids and
has become weakened by the en-
forced fasting.
Blake will use Gerry Cheevers
of Boston and Ed Giacomin of the
New York rangers in the net.
On the eve of the game, per-
sistent reports have coaches Ber-
nie Geoffrion on his last legs at
New York and Red Sullivan in
trouble at Pittsburgh.
Geoffrion returned to New York
Monday after spending the week-
end in an Oakland hospital. He
collapsed in the dressing room fol-
lowing the Rangers' 3-1 victory
over the Seals Friday night. Doc-
tors diagnosed his condition as a
lack of sufficient sugar in his
blood brought on by the flu and
unstable eating habits.

Billboa rd

Slack who notched two goals and
four assists, and netminder Jim
lIecugh, who turned away 40 Tiger
shots.
Perrin, the team's leading goal-
getter, collected two goals while
Doug Galbraith and Barny Pashak
each tallied once.
On Saturday, in a repetition of
their previous Saturday's per-
formance, the Wolverines opened
the game by blitzing the opposi-
tion net for the first ten minutes
of play but were again unable
to bulge the mesh.
The Tigers then scored three
times within the span of a min-
ute and a half to pull in front
for good. Michigan played what
Renfrew called "their finest period
of the series" in the final stanza
of Saturday's game as the Wol-
verines narrowed the gap to 5-4
while outshooting the Tigers 14-3.
The difference proved to be the
phenomenal goaltending of the
Tigers' Don Gale.
In trying to explain Saturday's
defeat Renfrew noted, "We played
only a period and a half of good
hockey and that wasn't enough.
I guess we mentally let down a
little from the big series with Den-
ver, figuring we should beat a
team like that (Colorado College
1-7 through last Friday) ."
He was imperative about his
team's improvement over the night
before. "We definitely should have
won Saturday and lost Friday,"
he mused.
The weekend split kept the Wol-
verines in second place in the
WCHA with a 6-2 league record,
three games behind league-leading
North Dakota and a game in front
of third place Michigan Tech.
NHL
SCORING LEADERS
G A Pts.
1. Esposito, Bos 29 38 67
2. B. Hull, Chi 30 32 62
3. Howe, Det 21 37 58
4. Mikita, Chi 17 38 55
5. Berenson, St. L 21 29 50
6. Uliman, Tor 23 26 49
7. Beiveau, Mtl 18 31 49
8. Delvecehio, Det 17 32 49
9. Hodge, Bos 21 25 46
10. Pappin, Chi 20 26 46

'*

The U
hold its
meeting

of M Rugby Club will
annual organizational
on Wednesday, Jan-

uary 22, at 7 p.m. in room 131
of the Business Administration
Building. The club will elect
new officers and discuss t h e
previous season. The meeting is
open to anyone interested in
joining the club.
* * *
The Markley Fan Club is
chartering a bus forthe gym-
nastics meet at. Western Mich-
igan Saturday, January 25. The
bus will return that night. For
information call 662-4331.

-Daily-Richard Lee
MICHIGAN'S BRIAN SLACK (8) digs for the puck in the Minnesota Duluth zone in an early-sea-
son encounter won by the Wolverines 8-2. Slack showed his explosiveness last Friday against Cold-
rado College, breaking loose for ,2 goals and 4 assists in a 6-4 Wolverine victory. Previously against
Michigan State, he scored both goals in a victory.
RAN WITH THORPE:
Hopi track man races last mile
on trail of A rizo na reservation

4

WCHA

i

Standings
W L T

Centa Student.,Judiciary
(formerly Joint Judiciary Council)
Announces Open Petitioning
for
FIVE SEATS
Sign up for interviews at SGC offices
1st floor, SAB
Petitions due Tuesday, January 21, 5:00 P.M.

North Dakota
MICHIGAN
Mich. Tech.
Denver
Minnesota
Mich. State
Colorado College
Minn. - Duluth

10
6
5
8
4
z
1:

2
2
2
4
5
5
7
11

0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0

... :...,u_. .......".....,..5 .... r.. .... " ",.: .. .:..a . . ."::. .":.. . . . . . . . . . .:«":;-;rr:;;.. .:.":"r;":a,;rry;,:.>::a.::.;.:..'::. .::a.
.>.:.9. ; k :: - . " r n.. . : ,-.... .. X: : . :". r v - : ..... ** .** . : .\ "x , rr?}:':::.;: . *; . "" a i , r~
ATTENTION:
.4j THE19 9
.MICHIGA NENSIA N
_t Ally be reserved inz the
EFISHBOWL
This Week
Tutesday thru Friday IJ1.00 to 4:00
M} Reserve Your Yearbook
3IlA

{I
i
I
<:
i
4
::,

We. can leach you to read
faster - (3-4-5 Times Faster)
with better comprehension.
EVELYN WOOD READING
DYNAMICS FOR
IMPROVED
:.GRADES
.CONCENTRATION
. COMPREHENSION
"STUDY SKILLS
e RECALL SKILLS
MRS. EVELYN WOOD " RESEARCH SKILLS
It is difficult for those who read in the plodding, old-fashioned
way to appreciate the sense of freedom that comes with
effortless reading. Most of you read the way people did a century
ago-word by word, at rates of perhaps 150 to 350 words
a minute.
But now there is a new and modern way to read. It is called
Reading Dynamics. With it you can read at least three times
faster than you now do, without skipping or skimming.
You can learn this new way of reading in just a few hours a
week. It will help you to understand better what you read and
to remember it longer. And you'll find you enjoy your reading
more.
The Reading Dynamics method has been used by many
students, United States Senators, Congressmen, educators,
business executives and professional people. President Kennedy
asked us to give this course to members of his staff in the
White House.
In the last decade Reading Dynamics has shown more
than 400,000 persons how to increase their reading speed
and comprehension substantially. We may be able to
do the same for you.
In fact, if you follow the course correctly, you will at least
triple your reading-comprehension rate, or your tuition will be
refunded.
Learn the facts about Reading Dynamics-plan
to join us in this exciting new experience.
FREE Mini-Lesson DEMONSTRATION
0 THURSDAY, JAN. 23
N YW-YMCA-350 S. 5th Ave. N
L across from Ann Arbor Library L
Y 4 P.M., 6 P.M.-8 P.M.J Y
See a TV Mini-Lesson
Tonight, Channel 62, 10:15 P.M.
If You Cannot Attend a Demonstration,
callcollect 353-5111 or malcoupon
EVELYN WOOD

SECOND MESA, Ariz. (P)-
Louis Tewanima, who left the
Hopi Indian Reservation for
Olympic track fame in the days
of Jim Thorpe, is dead.
Feeble and more than 90 years
old, the one-time distance runner
fell from a 70-foot cliff to his
death late Saturday night on the
reservation where he had spent
all but five years of his life.
In those five years, he went to
the Carlisle Indian School, and
ran on Coach Glenn "Pop" War-
ner's track teams.
He finished ninth in the 26-
mile run in the 1908 Olympics at
London, and four years later came
in second to the Flying Finn, Kan-
EASUME CUESTr
FAMILY ME ALS, GE T TOGET HERS
PICNICS, L ATE EVENING SNACKS
Phone your order ahead for
immediate pick-up service
FAMILY RESTAURANT

Professional Standings

nes Kolehmainen, in the 10,000 "Me run fast good," the Indian
meters at Stockholm. No American youth replied. "All Hopis run fast
bettered his time at that distance good."'
until Billy Mills did it at the 1964 Writing in 1940, Thorpe recalled
Tokyo Games. that he, Tewanima, and a third
He attended a religious cere- Indian, Frank Mount Pleasant,
mony at the Kiva here Saturday made up a team that-beat the 20-
night, according to a nephew, Al- man team at Lafayette College,
fred Joshongeva, and was return- and later won a dual meet with
ing to his home at Shonogopovi, Syracuse.
about a mile away. He apparently Thorpe and Tewanima were
mistook a beacon light, the nephew
sai, tok he ron tril nd el good enough that they were se-
said, took the wrong trail and fell
donthe cliff. lected for the U.S. Olympic team
He was found early Sunday,
and, according to Hopi custom, Tewanima spent about a month
buried the same day. at Carlisle after the 1912 Games,
When he enrolled at Carlisle then returned home to tend his
Indian s c h o o 1 weighing 110 sheep and raise his crops. He rare-
pounds, Tewanima reportedly ly left the reservation.
asked Warner for a track suit. In 1954, the Helms Foundation
"What for?" asked Warner. flew him to New York to be hon-
"You're not big enough to do any ored as a member of the all-time
thing." U.S. track and field team.

1

N H L
East Division

Boston
Montreal
Toronto
Chicago
Detroit
New York
St. Louis
Oakland
Los Angeles
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh
Minnesota

Wv L T Pts. GFGAj1
26 8 9 61169 112 Baltimore
25 12 7 57 148 119 Boston
20 12 10 50 129 112 Philadelphia
23 19 3 49 160 135 New York
21 17 7 49 146 132 Cincinnati
22 18 4 48 120 112 Detroit
Milwaukee

NBA
Eastern Division
W L
34 11
31 15
a 30 14
32 19
25 22
19 28
15 34
Western Division
s 32 15
30 17
21 27
sco 20 27
19 29
15 35
9 39

Piet.
.756
.674,
.682
.627
.532
.404
.306
.681
.638
.438
.426'
.396
.300
.188

West Division
22 11 11
16 24 6
15 20 6
11 23 11
10 28 7
9 29 7

GB
3%
3%
5
10
16-
21
2
11Y2
12
13%
18Y
23Y2

55
38
36
33
27
25

126
111
92
95
115
101

88 Los Angeles
146 Atlanta
118 Chicago
125 San Franci
158 San Diego
155 Seattle
Phoenix

Sunday's Results
Boston 5, Toronto 3
Philadelphia 3, Detroit 1
St. Louis 3, Minnesota 1
Oakland 6, Pittsburgh 3
Only games scheduled.
Today's Game
Al-Star Game at Montreal
Only game scheduled.

Last Night's Results
Milwaukee 102, Detroit 101
Baltimore 122, Boston 109
Only games scheduled.
Today's Games
Los Angeles at Milwaukee
Seattle at New York
Baltimore at Chicago
Atlanta at San Diego
Cincinnati at San Francisco
Only games scheduled.

4

i

February 34, 1969
Become a part of the better idea company in the following fields:

Design Engineering
Design implementation-packaging-cost manu-
facturing feasibility-vendor consulting.
Development Engineering
Vehicle systems and component development-
engineering evaluation.
""" Test Engineering
Program, facilities, and methods development-
vehicle systems and component testing.
Technical Computer
Systems Engineering

Manufacturing Engineering
Process engineering-pJant layout-tool design--
material handling-Industrial engineering.
Plant Engineering
Maintenance control and scheduling-equipment
installation-stru'ctural changes-utility services.
Quality Control
In-process inspection and material testing-sup-
plier quality control-machine capability-product
testing.
Prrbuir'rnn Crnntrni

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan