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January 21, 1969 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1969-01-21

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Tuesday, January 21, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Tuesday, January21, 1969 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

NO 2-6264
STEVE
M~cQUEEI I
AS;
Detective It. Fran
IulIitt--0some
other hind of cop.

HELD OVER
6th WEEK:
SHOWS AT
1:00 -3:00 -5:00 -7:10
and 9:15

SHUNS CONTROVERSY:

':

Inauguration: Nixon 's trip from
obscurity to consensus politics

I

~.

By FRANK CORMIER
Associated Press Writer
WASHINGTON (P) - Richard
Milhous Nixon, returned from
the p~olitically dead to become
37th President of the United
States, is shunning the contro-
versies of yesteryear in a new
search for consensus.
Marching under the inaugural
banner of "Forward Together,"
Nixon moves into the White
House with the same air of deli-

beration and caution that mark-
ed his election campaign.
To a generation of voters once
removed from those who cast
first ballots in 1968, this stance
seems almost alien to the Nixon
of 15 or 20 years ago known for
his hard-nosed partisanship.
If Nixon's apparent shift away
from narrow partisanship is
part of the Nixon phenomenon,
more remarkable is the fact that
he sits in the White House just

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six years after many politicans
and commentators presided at
what they were certain was his
political autopsy.
After losing the closest presi-
dential election in 76 years to
John F. Kennedy in 1960, Nixon
two years later was defeated for
governor of California. Standing
before television cameras, he
voiced to newsmen the bitter-
ness of a two-time loser:
"You won't h a v e Nixon to
d kick around any longer because,
gentlemen, this is my last press
confer once."
The Nixon career has been
marked by obstacles encounter-
ed and, one way or another, ov-
ercome. Although he professes
no fondness for the Horatio Al-
ger-type myth, there is a bit of
that in his past.
His Quaker parents, Frank
and Hannah Nixon, never knew
dire poverty y e t flirted fre-
quently with economic distress,
because of ambitious plans gone
awry and costly illness t h a t

Ending

E

Wednesday
Christopher
Plummer

Orson
Welles

Dial
8-6416
Lilli
Palmer

An unsurpassed cast in one
of the great plays of the ages!
OEDIPUS THE KING
A Crossroads Film Production/Universol
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A UNIVERSAL RELEASE 10 TECHNICOLOR

6

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mo' yJERRY BOCK
Pen tbJSOR N ICK
[ie P-od,(t an "' o "'"gaphed b f
Per AEROME ROBBINS

claimed the lives of two of their
five sons.
Parttime jobs, a scholarship
and some help from the family
enabled Nixon to graduate from
Whittier College and the Duke
Law School. He was elected
student body president at each,
excelled on the debating teams
and won high scholastic honors.
With law degree in hand,
Nixon considered becoming an
FBI agent and was promised an
interview with J. Edgar Hoover.
Instead he returned to Whittier
and worked in a private law
firm headed by the Republican
city attorney.
With the Japanese attack on
Pearl Harbor, Nixon offered his
services to the federal govern-
ment and moved to Washington
to help set up rubber rationing
for the wartime Office of Price
Administration. Pat Nixon went
to work for Uncle Sam, too.
After a few weeks in the capi-
tol, Nixon sought a Navy com-
mission, although as a Quaker
he could have claimed exemp-
tion from active service. The
commission was granted in the
summer of 1942 and Nixon serv-
ed successively in landlocked
Iowa, the combat-scarred is-
lands of the South Pacific,
Southern California and Wash-
ington.
While still wearing the uni-
form of a lieutenant commander,
Nixon entered politics in 1946
by invitation-not through his
own initiative.
Republicans back in Whittier
were seeking a candidate to
challenge a 10-year House vet-
eran, Jerry Voorhis; they even
rana help-wanted advertise-
ment in a local newspaper.
Someone suggested "Nixon's the
one" and he flew home for a
job interview.
The campaign transformed
Nixon into a controversial polit-
ical figure-and a winner.
Second Class postage paid at Ann
Arbor, Michigan, 420 Maynard St., Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Published daily Tuesday through
Sunday morning University year. Sub-
scription rates: $9.00 by carrier, $10.00
by mail.

* 6rSpecial Ph miss:o« of#Arnold

MON.-TU ES.
JAN. 27-28
HILL AUDITORIUM
THREE PERFORMANCES ONLY!
ADVANCE SALES ATHPTP TICKET OFFICE
MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
HILL AUD. BOX OFFICE OPENS AT 5:15 P.M. MONDAY
Professional Theatre Program

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f '
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Creatigve Arts Festival
UNION-LEAGUE
presents
CLIVE B-ARNES
Drama, Dance Critic, New York Times
SPEAKING ON
"Theatre'9: New and, 1ivin
Sun., Jan. 26 Union Ballroom
2:00 P.M.
75c STUDENT $1 NON-STUDENT
Tickets available in Fishbowl and C.A.F. Offices-
3rd floor League
SUBSCRIBER TICKETS STILL AVAILABLE

the 'a
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
IN THE SOVIET UNION'S first official statement to
the Nixon administration yesterday, Moscow told Presi-
dent Nixon it is eager to begin talks with the United
States on limiting nuclear missile systems, including anti-
ballistic missiles.
A Soviet government statement, given by Leonid Zam-
yatin, head of the Foreign Ministry press section, said agree-
ment with the United States on restricting the arms race "Is
quite feasible though not an easy thing."
. The United States had stalled on opening negotiations
because of the Soviet-bloc occupation of Czechoslovakia.
AIR FORCE STARLIFTERS landed at Nuernberg's
airport yesterday carrying U.S.-based combat troops for
maneuvers near the Czech border.
The exercises, in which about 15,000 troops will partici-
pate, come under the direction of the North Atlantic Treaty
Organization.
The participating U.S. forces will be about 20 miles from
the frontier behind which the Russian A r m y now lies In
strength.
The Soviet Union called the planned maneuvers a provo-
cation.
THE NATIONAL GUARD guarded the streets of Wi-
mington, Del. last night for the last time a f ter nine
months of dusk-to-dawn patrols to prevent a repetition
of last April's riots
Governor-elect Russell W. Peterson announced Sunday
night that one of his first official acts 'after his inauguration
today would be to deactivate the guard patrols.
* . .
THE SUPREME COURT yesterday ruled that cities
and states cannot require referral of anti-discrimination
laws in open housing to voters.
In an 8-1 decision, the Court held that laws intended to
improve housing conditions for blacks- and other minorities
cannot constitutionally be subjected to voter sanction not
demanded of other laws.
The decision answered a procedure instituted in Akron,
Ohio in 1964 to give voters veto-power over open housing or-
dinances.
THE SENATE confirmed 11 of President Nixon's 12
new Cabinet members,
The only nominee not given immediate approval was Gov.
Walter J. Hickel of Alaska as secretary of the interior.
The Senate Interior Committee had approved his ap-
pointment yesterday after five days of close scrutiny that
produced controversy over his policy views and financial
holdings. The Senate is expected to vote on his appointment
today.
THE SPEED which marked the agreement on the new
phase of the Vietnam peace talks caught the United
States by surprise.
Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge, who only arrived in Paris
last night, announced that there would be no talks today.
Lodge will be briefed by his colleagues, including Ambassador
Cyrus R. Vance, the holdover deputy chairman of the U.S.
delegation.
* . .
VIET CONG BROADCASTS called yesterday for a
stepped up, war to drive out the United States forces and
overthrow theSaigon government.
They also proposed a national general meeting to discuss
peace and a political settlement.
The broadcasts followed a weekend of intensified Viet
Cong shellings and terrorist incidents. However, a U.S. spokes-
man said there had been no reports of new thrusts against
towns or military posts.
* . .
CMDR. LLOYD M. BUCHER, captain of the USS Pu-
eblo, said yesterday that there was no destruct system on
board to destroy secret equipment and code when the in-
telligence ship was captured by North Koreans.
In his opening testimony at a court of inquiry Into the
seizure of the Pueblo last year, Bucher said that he had ad-
dressed a classified letter to the chief of naval operations re-
questing the system, but was told that it was impossible to
include it without a "great deal of expense and time."

THE TRIAL OF CLAY SHAW, accused of conspiring
to kill President John F. Kennedy, is scheduled to begin
today in New Orleans.
Dist. Atty. Jim Garrison withdrew a motion for a delay
yesterday. An assistant to Garrison said the prosecution was
ready to proceed but refused to discuss the reasons behind
the withdrawal.

ULYSSES'A

SUPERB FILM!"
-life Magazine
'owl

Mad Marvin Invites
You to Trip with him
and his friends

IKTITAF

in a colossal

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Thurs., Fri., Sat., Sun.-11:00 P.M.
Vth Forum-separate admission

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"ULYSSES" 7:00-"BALCONY" 9:15

THE COMEDY GREATS-Program 1
W. C. FIELDS-"California Bound"
MARX BROS.-"Incredible Jewel Robbery"-pantomine
LAUREL AND HARDY-"Big Business"-one of their really great ones with one
of the wildest comic destruction scenes ever filled. "It will drive you mad."
"THE GREAT CHASE"-Uproarious! 60 years of great movie chases. Featuring:
Douglas Fairbanks, William S. Hart, Perils of Pauline, 30 minutes of Buster
Keaton's greatest comedy epic THE GENERAL.
"HAPPY ANNIVERSARY"-Highly creative, experimental French comedy-Aca-
demy Award Oberhausen Film Festival, 1963.
PLUS-Continuing BUCK ROGERS space serial and BETTY BOOP cartoon.

DIAL 5-6290
ENDS Thursday
"-r
* FRIDAY *
GREGORY PECK
in
"THE STALKING
MOON"

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