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July 13, 1963 - Image 6

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Michigan Daily, 1963-07-13

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

wo

Tie for 'Open' Lead

WESTERN OPEN:
NU's Riessen Tops
Semifinalist Field

MAJOR LEAGUE ROUNDUP:
Koufax Tosses Ninth Shutout

ST. ANNE'S, England (P)- Phil
Rodgers, a pudgy ex-Marine from
La Jolla, Calif., and Bob Charles
of New Zealand, the only top-
flight left-handed pro golfer in
the world, shot steady par fours
on the final hole yesterday and
tied for the British Open Golf
Championship.
They will play off over 36 holes
of the 6,757-yard Royal Lytham
and St. Anne's course today.
Rodgers and Charles finished
with 72-hole totals of 277, one
Palmer May
Take Layoff
ST. ANNE'S, England (P - Ar-
nold Palmer, dethroned in the
British Open, said yesterday he
might take another layoff from
golf after next week's PGA
Championship at Dallas..f
"I'm tired," he said, after he
shot a final round 76, for a 294
total, which tied for 26th place.
"I may take a rest again."
Palmer even intimated he
might not return for the British
Open next year. Reminded that
he had promised "always" to play
in the British championship so
long as he was competing, he'
said:
"I don't know whether I'll play
next year. There is some ques-

stroke over the Open record 276
posted by Arnold Palmer at Troon
last year. Palmer skied to a final
round 76 and finished at 294-17
strokes back-in his try for his
third straight championship.
Nicklaus Blows rinish
But it was Jack Nicklaus, the
Ohio strong boy and U. S. Masters
champion, who let the tournament
slip from his grasp during the
wild three-man charge down the
stretch. Nicklaus faltered on the
last two holes and finished with
278, a stroke behind the co-lead-
ers.
Nicklaus, playing ahead of
Rodgers and Charles, knocked in
a 17-foot putt for a birdie three
at the 16th hole and seehed to
have his first British Open firmly
in hand.
However,, he knocked a two-
iron over the green at the par
four 17th, fluffed his first ap-
proach and settled for a five. He
hit his drive into a bunker on the
18th and got another five.
Both Finish Strong
That left it up to Rodgers and
Charles. They matched Nicklaus'
three at the 16th, got fours on the
17th, and while the crowd of 5,000
gathered around the home green
both reached it in two.
Charles was about 35 feet away,
Rodgers only 15. Charles putted
some 30 inches past and Rodgers
left his putt nine inches short.
The 25-year-old ex-Marine put-
ted out, although the ball wobbled
on the edge for a fraction of a

second. Then Charles calmly
canned his to force the playoff.
It is the first playoff in the
British Open since 1958, when
Peter Thomson of Australia won
his fourth championship over D.
C. Thomas of England.
Rodgers had rounds of 67-69-71
and a final 69.-
Hits Course Record
Charles shot 68-72-66 and 71.
His third round 66 was listed as a
course record, since the links has
been lengthened and toughened
since Thomson shot a 63 in 1958..
Nicklaus had 71-67-70 and a
final 70 for his 278.
Kel Nagle of Australia, who
defeated Palmer by one stroke in
the 1960 Open, finished with 283
for fourth place.
Thomson, only a stroke off the
pace set by Charles after 54 holes,
skied to a 78 and finished fifth
with 285.
Player Finishes 10 Back
Gary Player of South Africa,,
the 1959 winner, finished with 287
-10 strokes off the leaders.
Rodgers was highly pleased
with his play. The perky, porky
ex-Marine who won the Texas
Open earlier this year, said no
matter what happens in the play-
off, "I want to come back and
play in the British Open again."
He said he figured at the 15th
hole, where Nicklaus three-putted
from 12 feet for a five, that he
had a chance. "I thought if I
could finish 3-4-4 I'd catch him,
and I did."
Charles, who is 27 and won the
Houston Open this year, has
never threatened in the British
Open before.
A HAIRCUT
IN A HURRY?
* 4 Master Barbers
" Air-Conditioned
Welcome to
U-M BARBERS
near Kresge's

:I

-- I

By The Associated Press
MILWAUKEE - The top four
seeded entries, led by Big Ten
champion Marty Riessen of Evan-
ston, Ill., advanced through the
quarter-finals yesterday in the
73rd Western Open Tennis Tour-
nament.
Moving into the semifinals with
the top-rated star from Northwest-
ern were Bill Lenoir of Tucson,
Ariz., Larry Nagler of North Hol-
lywood, Calif. and Andy Lloyd of
Shreveport, La.
Riessen, the NCAA runnerup,
ousted Gary Rose of Orinda,
Calif., 6-2, 6-0. Lenoir, Arizona
standout seeded second; eliminat-
ed Eduardo Zulueta of Ecuador,
6-4, 6-1.
Nagler, seened number three,
rallied to defeat Brazil Davis Cup-
per Ronald Barnes, 6-2, 3-6, 6-4.
Lloyd, seeded fourth, scrambled
to a 6-2, 3-6, 6-3 triumph over
Clark Graebner of Shaker Heights,
Ohio. Graebner held a 4-2 lead in
the third set, but pulled a thigh
muscle and was unable to hold off
Lloyd.
The women duplicated the men
in sending the four seeded en-L
tries into the semifinals today.'
Top-ranked Nancy Richey of Dal-
las, Tex. and third-seeded Gwyn-
eth Thomas of Shaker Heights
joined Vicky Palmer and Justina
Thomas, who won quarter-final
tests Thursday.
* *,*
McKinley Makes Semi's
BAASTAD, Sweden--Chuck Mc-
Kinley, newly-crowned Wimbledon
champion from San Antonio, Tex.,
advanced to the semifinals of the
Baastad tennis tournament yester-
day with a 6-3, 4-6, 6-3, 10-8 vic-
tory over Joergen Ulrich of Den-
mark.
McKinley will meet Boro Jova-
novic of Yugoslavia. Jovanovic
romped over Mexico's Antonio
Palafox, 6-2, 6-1, 8-6, yesterday.

DUBLIN - Carole Caldwell of
Santa Monica, Calif., made it an
All-American women's final in the
Irish Tennis Championships yes-
terday by defeating Judy Alvarez
of Tampa, Fla., 6-3, 6-2.
In today's final Miss Caldwell
will meet Billie Jean Moffitt of
Long Beach, Calif., who won her
semifinal Thursday.
* * *
Osuna Meets Emerson
BIRMINGHAM, England-Raf-
ael Osuna, Mexican Davis Cup
star, avenged his Wimbledon de-
feat yesterday by beating Manuel
Santana of Spain, 6-3, 3-6, 6-4,
and gaining the final round of the
English Midlands tennis cham-
pionships.
In today's final he will meet
Roy Emerson of Australia, who de-
feated Mike-Sangster of Great
Britain 4-6, 6-3, 7-5.
* * *
'Peaches' Still Tops
CHATTANOOGA - Three de-
fending champions had little trou-
ble yesterday in defending their
titles against three California
threats in the USLTA boys and
girls championships.
Jane (Peaches) Bartkowicz of
Hamtramck retained the girls 14-
under title by defeating Lynne
Abbes of Orinda, Calif., 6-3, 6-2.
The boys 12-under champion-
ship was taken, again by Dickie
Stockton of Riverdale, N.Y., who
put down fourth-seeded Erik Van
Dillien of San Mateo, Calif., 6-1,
6-2.
* * -*
McKinley Favored on Clay
CHICAGO -- Chuck McKinley,
the first American to win the Wim-
bledon crown since 1955, is strong-
ly favored to repeat as National
Clay Court champion in the week-
long meet at the River Forest Ten-
nis Club opening Monday.

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK-Sandy Koufax
gave another dazzling pitching
performance last night, firing his
third straight shutout and ninth
of the season with a three-hitter
as the Los Angeles Dodgers beat
New York's stumbling Mets, 6-0.
Koufax led the National League
leaders to their fifth successive
victory and pinned the last-place
Mets with their 13th loss in a row.
The young left-hander, winning
for the eighth straight time, be-
came the first 15-game winner in
the majors.
* * *
Kolb Helps Cards
ST. LOUIS-Gary Kolb's first
major league home run with a
man on climaxed a four-run third
inning that gave the St. Louis
Cardinals a 5-3 victory over the
Milwaukee Braves last night.
Bob Gibson scattered nine hits
in 7% innings but needed relief
Major LeaEue
Standings
NATIONAL LEAGUE

help from Barney Schultz to gain
his ninth victory in 13 decisions.
Solo homers by Gene Oliver in
the second inning and Mack Jones
in the ninth and a pinch-hit dou-
ble by Don Dillard in the seventh
gave Milwaukee its runs.
* * *
Cubs Beat Cinci
CINCINNATI .- The Chicago
Cubs scrambled to a 4-1 victory
over Cincinnati last night, hand-
ing the Reds' ace left-hander Jim
O'Toole his fourth straight loss.
The Cubs tagged O'Toole for 10
hits and three of their runs in
his seven innings. He now has
lost seven and won 13.
* * *
Schofield's Homer Downs Houston
PITTSBURGH-Dick Schofield's
homer and three straight sixth
inning singles gave the Pittsburgh
Pirates a 2-1 victory over Hous-

ton last night.
Schofield hit his third
into the lower right field
off starter and loser Bob
with one out in the sixth.

homer
stands
Bruce

powered the Boston Red Sox to a
3-2 victory over slumping Minne-
sota.
The left-handed hitting out-
fielder, the American League's
leading hitter, stroke his eighth
homer of the season over the left
centerfield fence and tagged the
Twins with their fifth straight
loss.
** *
Freehan's Hit Wins
CHICAGO - Rocky Colavito's
leadoff double in the 12th inning
and a run-scoring single by Bill
Freehan lifted the Detroit Tigers
to a 7-6 victory over the Chicago
White Sox last night.
The White Sox scored four runs
in the first inning, capped by Ron
Hansen's two-run homer, and
wiped out a 2-0 Detroit lead, but
the Tigers battled back and tied
it in the fifth with a pair of runs
on Bubba Phillips' sacrifice fly
and Freehan's run-scoring single.
Freehan is a former Michigan
catcher.
Mars Beter
After Surgery
NEW YORK (M)-Roger Maris,
slugging right fielder of the New
York Yankees, was operated on
yesterday afternoon and was re-
ported feeling fine after brief sur-
gery.
Maris is expected to remain in
the hospital until Tuesday or Wed-
nesday and rejoin the Yankees in
a week. The Yankees open a se-
ries at home against Cleveland
next Friday.
The operation for a rectal fis-
sure took only 30 minutes and
was completely successful.
The other half of the slugging
Yankee combo, Mickey Mantle,
was reinstated on the active list.

Los Angeles
San Francisco
St. Louis
Chicago
Cincinnati
Milwaukee
Pittsburgh
Philadelphia.
Houston
New York

W
53
49
48
47
47
44
43
42
34
29

L
33
39
39
39
42
42
43
45
56
58

Pct.
.6x6
.557
.552
.547
.528
.512
.500
.483
.378
.333

i
2
2

A

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Los Angeles 6, New York 0
Philadelphia 7, San Francisco 5
Pittsburgh 2, Houston 1
St. Louis 5, Milwaukee 3
Chicago 4, Cincinnati 1
TODAY'S GAMES
Los Angeles at New York
San Francisco at Philadelphia
Houston at Pittsburgh
Chicago at Cincinnati
Milwaukee at St. Louis
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct.
x-New York 51 31 .617
Boston 47 37 .563;
Chicago 48 39 .552
Baltimore 49 40 .552
Cleveland 45 40 .529
Minnesota 45 41 .5261
x-Los Angeles 41 47 .466 1
Kansas City 36 47 .434 1
Detroit 36 48 .432 1
Washington 30 58 .342 24
x-Playednight game.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Baltimore 4, Washington 3
Detroit 7, Chicago 6
Boston 3, Minnesota 2
New York at Los Angeles (inc)
Cleveland at Kansas City (ppd),
TODAY'S GAMES
New York at Los Angeles
Detroit at Chicago
Cleveland at Kansas City
Boston at Minneapolis
Baltimore at Washington
Edelen Beats

GB
5~~
6
72/
9
0
11Y2
1
24f2
GB
5
522
3
16
24

Phillies Rally
PHILADELPHIA - Doubles by
Roy Sivers, Don Demeter and Clay
Dalrymple sparked two big Phila-
delphia rallies last night and drove
in all the runs as the Phillies de-
feated San Francisco, 7-5, despite
three Giant homers.
* * *
Orsino'sBlast Beats Nats
WASHINGTON - John Orsino
blasted a two-run homer in the
ninth inning last night and
brought the streaking Baltimore
Orioles their eighth victory in
nine games, a 4-3 triumph over
the Washington Senators.
* * *
Red Sox Edge Twins
MINNEAPOLIS - ST. PAUL -
Carl Yastrzemski lashed an oppo-
site field home run in the top of
the 12th inning last night and

VAN BOVEN SEMI-ANNUAL SALE
ALL ITEMS of clothing and furnishings offered in this sale represent excellent values in only the finest
of imported and domestic goods. Every article is from regular stock and reduced for quick clearance.
CLOTHING
SUITS TO PCOATSSpr os
U S33V% to 50% offpo Coats
SPECIAL GROUP SPECIAL GROUP
33% to 50% off
SPECIAL GROUP SPECIAL GROUP
3 PANTS...20%1io 50% off 3
SPECIAL GROUP SPECIAL GROUP §
20 oJACKETS ..... Now
off ~~Were $15 2oof
Swiss Cotton, Zipper Front
FURNISHINGS
BERMUDA DRESS SHIRTS SPORT SHIRTS
SHORTS (Short and Long Sleeves) (Including Knits)
Were Now i
Were 7.95..... NOW 5.95 Were 6.50 to 8.95 §
Were 8.95....NOW 6.95 NOW575(3for1650) 4.95 to 5.95 . . . .. 39
Were 10.00 ..... NOW 7.95 6x95
Were 10.95 ......NOW 8.50 .50 to 6.95..
BERMUDA HOSE .. 50% off S L7.50 to 8.95 . . . . . 650
Robes 333%% off This Sale represents a fine selection 9.50 to 10.00 . . . 795
BELTS of our specially designed man-tailored
.BELTS Ladies' Shrts, Sirt
Were 3.50.....,NOW 2.65 and Bermudas Were 3.50.....NOW 2.65
Were 2.50..... NOW 1.65Reutosfm Were 2.50..... NOW 1.65 §
Reductions from Were 3.50 . . . .NOW 2.65
§ Straw Hats. 50% off 20% to 50% Were 5.00 to 7.50 NOW 3.65

U.S. Record
LONDON (RP) - America's Bud
Edelen was pushed to a U.S. rec-
ord in the six-mile run and Cali-
fornia's Davie Weill won the dis-
cus in the British AAA Track and
Field Championshipslast night.
A former Big Ten champion
from Minnesota and now a school
teacher in England, Edelen re-
corded the fastest six-mile time
ever produced by an American
while finishing fourth behind
Britain's durable Ronnie Hill in
the final. Hill's time of, 27:49.8
was only six seconds off the listed
world mark. Edelen came home
70 yards behind the leader but
in 28:00.8-well inside the 28:26
U.S. record he set last year.
West Coast
Slams Publinx
SACRAMENTO (MP)-Long hit-
ters Steve Oppermann and Bob
Lunn turned the National Public
Links Golf Championship into an
all-San Francisco final following
semifinal victories in.36-hole
matches yesterday.'
Oppermann, 21, who has been
playing 3% years, ousted the tour-
nament upset king, 49-year-old
Dante Vicini of Ottawa, Ill., 4 and
3.
Lunn, 18, who graduated only
last month from high school, broke
a 30-hole tie and beatthe home-
town favorite, 20-year-old Jerry
Yuke, 3 and 1.
II ZINDELL OLDSMOBILE

FIND OUT SUNDAY:
It May Not Be Baseball
But It Sure Is Crieket
By CHARLIE TOWLE
Co-Sports Editor
Ferry Field will be the scene of one of the rarer sporting eventst
in the United States this Sunday at 2 p.m.-a cricket match.
The Michigan Cricket Club is hosting an aggregation of like
inclined gentlemen from Cleveland for the second annual Michigan-
Cleveland match.
Last year the local club engaged in two matches, winning its
Cleveland game but losing to a Windsor squad.
Fasten Your Safety Belts
In trying to explain the game of cricket to an American, the Eng-
lishman usually'starts out by pointing out that cricket is "rather like
that game you play here in the Colonies-yfu know the one you see
on the tube during the summer." Besides immediately alienating the
audience by not knowing the name of baseball, this statement also
points out one of the more established facts known on this side of the
Atlantic about the sport-Englishmen will never wholly understand
baseball and Americans will never fully comprehend cricket.
For those who are inclined to attempt? the solution of insoluble
puzzles, however, this Sunday's match will offer a fine opportunity to
further develop this psychosis. Anyone tempted to visit the Ferry Field
confines had better pack a lunch. Cricket matches are able to, and
often do, hang on for a matter of days.
Bring Cushions
Jagdish Saluja, spokesman for the local group, predicts, how-
ever, that Sunday's encounter will last four sun-filled hours.
In attempting to solve insoluble problems, it is always more frus-
trating if there are a few mystifying clues laid out. With this in mind
I will draw a few "red herrings" across your path (besides, I can't
figure the game out myself).
The clues:
1) Forget the term "field." The cricket playing area stretches
radially out from the wickets and encompasses all playable surface
area in the immediate neighborhood.
Six Acres of Field
The average cricket field is an area of six acres in a circular
shape having a diameter of 180 yards. As a result there is no such
thing as a ball being hit in foul territory.
2) The cricket team consists of 11 men. The bowler and wicket
keeper correspond to the pitcher and catcher in baseball. The remain-
ing nine men are termed the point, cover point, mid off, mid on, deep
mid off, deep mid on, short slip, third man, and the square leg. As to
who or what these men are-well, the last three named are not Bri-
gitte Bardot, Michael Rene or Captain Hook.
3) Two men are at bat at the same time, standing at opposite
wickets. Each man gets six hits on the ball. If in these six hits he
scores six runs, this is termed a home run. There are 11 outs in an
inning and two innings in a match. To score a run the hitter and his
partner must exchange wickets after the hitter has struck the ball in
defending his wickets. It is not necessary that the batters run ,on
every hit, however.
Hit Wicket
4) The wicket consists of three posts in the ground, 42" apart on
top, which are placed to spindle-shaped "bails." The bowler tries to
hit the wicket with the ball, which is one of the methods of scoring an
out. There are two wickets placed 22 yards apart.
5) Don't bother asking questions at Ferry Field this Sunday. It
will be every spectator for himself.
The starting eleven (and finishing eleven since there is no sub-
stitution) for the Michigan club, which has around 25 members, are
Dinesh Kamdar, Datta Kharbas, Push Bindarsingh, Yatish Shah, Raj
Nagori, Amar Badhuri, Sudhir Sabkar, Mohan Hede, Prem Pathak,
Vilas Mane, and (who let him in?) Ron Palmer.
The first 10 players are natives of Indi% which despite some past
differences have out-Britished the British in many customs, and the
last an intrepid, considering his teammates, Englishman.

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