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July 10, 1963 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1963-07-10

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aA O' THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JULY 10

Came e Lgroiherj "
eSALE
We feel confident that this is a sale that,
you will not want to miss . . . all items on
sale are from our unusual and distinctive
stock of only the very finest of domestic
and imported merchandise.
CLOTHING

,_

I Summer Weight Suits

:.

and'

-Associated Press
WILLIE STEALS SECOND-American League all-star second baseman Nellie Fox looks at the base-
ball as Willie Mays of the National League turns to get the word and sign from Umpire Al Smith
after stealing second base in the second inning yesterday. Mays got to first on a walk. He scored two
runs, batted in two and stole another base besides this one in leading the Nationals to a 5-3 victory.
MAYS HAS BIG DAY:
Nn-aAll-Stars Wi

Regular Weight Suits,
values to 125.00
NOW 20% OFF
Regular and Summer Weight Sport Coats
Values to 85.00
NOW 20% OFF
SLACKS, SELECTED SPORT COATS, SPECIAL
FEW TOPCOATS ...
20 to 50% OFF
FURNISHINGS

11

CLEVELAND (/P) - Wonderful
Willie Mays drove in two runs,
scored two and stole two bases yes-
terday for' the favored National
League in a 5-3 victory over the
American League in the 34th All-
Star baseball game.
A crowd of 44,160 amused them-
selves by booing the New York
Yankee contingent on the frus-
trated American League squad
that collected 11 hits to only six
singles for the winners.

dress Shirtsr
5.95 to 6.95 4.95 ea.
3 for 14.45

Manager Al Dark of the San
Francisco Giants stuck with his
National League starters most of
the way %while Ralph Houk of theI
Yankees substituted freely, using
21 of his 25 men.
Nationals Pull Close
The victory enabled the Nation-1
al League to cut the American's
lead in the series to 17-16-1. It
was the National's fifth triumph
in the last seven games and one
of the others was a tie.
Bobby Richardson of the Yanks
grounded into two rally-killing.
double plays and first baseman
Joe Pepitone of the Yanks chose
to make an unassisted out at first
base in the fifth while Tommy
Davis of Los Angeles scored from
third with the tie-breaking run.
Mays, who has been slumber-
ing in a season-long slump, helped
rewrite the All-Star record book
by topping two of his own marks
with the two runs and the,/two
stolen bases. He also tied Stan
Musial's high of 20 hits over a 20-
year span.
Bunning's Streak Broken
Jim Bunning of Detroit, unscor-
ed on in nine consecutive innings
of All-Star play, saw his streak
broken by an unearned run in the
fifth that made him the losing
pitcher.
Bunning had walked Tommy
Davis of Los Angeles, first man
up in the inning, with the score
tied at 3-3. After 'Hank Aaron of
Milwaukee flied out, Bill White of
the All-St. Louis Cardinal infield
hit a slow hopper to third. Frank
Malzone of Boston hesitated mo-
mentarily and then threw to sec-
ond to try for the force play.
Richardson dropped the ball as he
sped past the bag and Davis con-
tinued to third base.
Easy Way Out
When Mays grounded to Pepi-
tone, the Yankee first baseman
played it safe by running to first
for the, unassisted out. Many in
the stands thought he had a
chance to get Davis at the plate.
After pounding out seven hits
and three runs in the first three
innings, the Americans went
quietly the rest of the way while
the National added an insurance
run in the eighth when White sin-
gled, stole second and scored on
a single by Ron Santo of the Chi-
cago Cubs. -
Dick Radatz, the jumbo - sized
Boston relief man, then settled
down and struck out five men in
his two-inning relief stretch.

7.95 to 8.95

5.95 ea.

10.95 7.95 ea.
(Whites- Included)
Sport Shirts

RALPH HOUK
. go ahead; boo me."

Were

4.50 to 4.95
5.95 to 6.95

Now
3.70
4.95
5.95
6.95
7.95

7.95
8.95

Yankees Get
Biggest Boos
By The Associated Press
CLEVELAND-The New York
Yankees are still the team every-
body loves to hate, and the Yanks
say they don't mind it much,
themselves.
Neither first baseman Joe Pepi-
tone nbr manager Ralph Houk
would admit that he was bothered
by the booing showered down on
the Yanks in the All-Star game
here yesterday.
"We get that booing in all the
American League parks," said the
Yankee manager. "As soon as they
see the pinstripes they start it.
But that's why we draw people
into the park."
"It doesn't bother me when they
boo," said Pepitone. "It just
makes you try a little harder."

From the third to the eighth the
National did not manage to get a
hit off Bunning, Jim Bouton of
New York and Juan Pizarro of
Chicago.
The proud Yankees, who are
pulling away from the pack in the
American League race, did little
to enhance their image in this
contest. Richardson's error, the
two double plays he hit into and
Pepitone's debatable decision not
to try for the man at the plate
helped the Nationals.
Giant Star
Stubs Toe
CLEVELAND (P) - Willie Mays
laughed off an incident when he
stubbed his toe on the bottom of
the wire fence while making a
catch on Joe Pepitone in the
eighth inning' of yesterday's All-
Star game.
Mays insisted there was noth-
ing wrong with him in the club-
house after the game. He said the
toe on his right foot wasn't even
bruised.
"I can't hurt myself," said the
San Francisco Giants' star center
fielder. "I got to play tomorrow. I
play every day."
Alvin Dark, manager of the
Giants and manager of the Na-
tional League All-Stars, said,
"When I see Willie limp I know
he's okay. If he really gets hurt
he never wants anyone to know
about it."
Colleges Adopt
Letter of Intent
HOLLYWOOD, Fla. (IP) - A
government professor believes he
has succeeded in curing one of
college football's major headaches
-the recruiting of star players.
Dr. William Davis, a professor
at Texas Tech, devised a "letter-
of-intent" agreement which has
been accepted by most athletic
conferences and several major in-
dependent football powers.
The program has been "surpris-
ingly successful," Dr. Davis said
last Friday. He was heresto attend
the annual meeting of the Na-
tional Association of Collegiate
Commissioners.
Under the program, any athlete
who signs a letter-of-intent with
one school may not enroll in an-
other school which is party to the
agreement, without in effect los-
ing two years of collegiate eligi-
bility.
Six major conferences agreed
at the NCAA meeting in January
to give the idea a try. Volunteers
by the April 1 deadline included
the Atlantic Coast, Southeastern,
Southwest, Big Eight, Missouri
Valley and Big Ten conferences.
"The Southern Conference will
definitely join the agreement next
year and the Western Conference
has expressed interest," he said.
Many college coaches, particu-
larly those in smaller eastern
schools, opposed a national letter-
of-intent at the last NCAA meet-
ing. Several felt, Davis said, that.
since their schools do not give
grants-in-aid, signing of any com-
mitment made the athlete a pro-
fessional. Others felt that the pro-
gram would be unenforceable.

Oakland
May Get
Franchi Se
OAKLAND, Calif. (P) - This
city of 370,000 across the bay from
San Francisco mixed surprise and
hope over reports an American
League baseball team might move
to Oakland.
The report Monday that the
owner of the Kansas City Athletics
might move his club west grew
yesterday.
Robert T. Nahas, president of
a corporation which will build an
all-sports coliseum in Oakland,
told the Oakland Tribune in a tel-
ephone interview from Cleveland
he has been negotiating "with a
number of major league clubs."
'Prime Prospect'
"The American League owners
I've talked with all agree the East
Bay area is a prime prospect for
a major league baseball club,"
Nahas added.
More than anything else, in
case the Athletics should transfer
to Oakland, the boosters of this
East Bay center of a two-county
population of 1.5 million would
like to erase the notion that Oak-
land is a poor sports center.
The notion has been longin the
building. The old Oakland Acorns
faded out of the Pacific 'Coast
League before the National
League's Giants pushed the PCL
out of the bay area by moving
from New York's Polo Grounds to
San Francisco in 1958.
The notion was promoted also
by failure of the Oakland Jets in
professional basketball.
Pro Football Fails
And pro football has run into
tough sledding under circumstan-
ces striking similar to what the
Athletics would encounter if they
came to Oakland.
When the Oakland Raiders be-
came a part of the American
Football League three years ago,
there was no place in Oakland
for them to play. And a rival, the
San Francisco 49ers of the Na-
tional Football League, already
was well established.
If the Athletics came to Oak-
land, they first would have to try
to find a temporary hole, per-
haps in the Giants' Candlestick
Park.
'Usual Fee'
"We'd be happy to accept the
Athletics for the usual fee," said
San Francisco's Mayor George
Christopher, referring to the re-
ported wish of the Athletics to
use Candlestick Park when the
Giants are out of town.
He touched on a sticky prob-
lem. The City of San Francisco
built the park and has a contract
with the Giants' for its use.
Palmer Fires
Open' Tuneup
ST. ANNES, England (P) - Ar-
nold Palmer shot a four-under
par 66 yesterday in his final prac-
tice round for the British Open
golf championship with an exhi-
bition of driving that left most of
his .119 rivals gasping "his drives
were marvellous,"
The 33-year-old Latrobe, Pa.,
pro sets out today as the 2-1
favorite to take hi third straight
British Open crown.
Peter Thomson of Australia is
the only golfer who has won the
Open three straight times in mod-
ern history.
"Arnold missed only one fair-
way," Phil Rodgers of La Jolla,
Calif., said. "His driving was mar-
vellous. He missed the fairway
at the 15th-and then only by

about 10 feet."
Palmer, Rodgers, Jack Nicklaus,
the U.S. Masters champion from
Columbus; and Gary Player, the
South African who is fifth in the
money standings in. the United
States, played together.
Nicklaus and Rodgers defeated
Palmer and Player up in a best-
ball foursome.
Rodgers shot a 67, Player a 71
and Nicklaus a 73. For the first
time since practice started the
wind kicked up over the 6,757-yard
Royal Lytham and St. Annes links.
It has a par of 34-36-70.

HELP WANTED
PART TIME EMPLOYMENT FOR MALE
STUDENT - Duties involve care and
feeding of lab. animals, weekends
and holidays only. Experience with
animals helpful but not necessary.
Apply in person - Parke-Davis and
Co., 9 a.m.-3 p.m., 2800 Plymouth
Rd., Ann Arbor. An equal opportun-
ity employer. H3
USED CARS
'58 VW, Deluxe Sedan-Black with red
interior, sharp condition, radio. Only
$695. Call NO 2-8458. B8
TRIUMPH - TR-3, body and engine
excellent. $1275. Call NO 3-9176. N4
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
HI, FI,.TV, RADIO, and PHONO SER-
VICE. TV rentals, speaker reconing.
Free pick-upand deliversy service.
CAMPUS RADIO & TV, NO 5-6644,
325 E. Hoover. X
A-1 NEW AND USED INSTRUMENTS
BANJOS, GUITARS ANfl BONGOS
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington"
X1
MISCELLANEOUS
VERY RELIABLE WOMAN who cleans
and helps with care of children or
invalids. Desires regular day, % day
or evenings. Mrs. Modica, BU 2-0454.
M12
FOR ALL your shopping needs ask for
Ralph at RALPH'S MARKET
709 Packard
Food
Specialties
Kitchen Utensils
Open every night till 12 M2
TRANSPORTATION
Drive Yourself ...
AND SAVE
pickups, panels, stakes
MOVING VANS
Whit's Rent-A-Truck
HU 2-4434
50 Ecorse Road, Ypsilanti, Michigan
01
RENT-a-CAR
Call. NO 3-4156
Special weekend rates from 5 p.m.
Friday till, 9 a m. Monday
$10.00 plus Sc a mile. Rates include
gas, oil, insurance.
514 E. WASHINGTON ST.
G1

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 AYS$ 6 DAYS
2 .70 1.95 3.45
3 .85 2 40 4.20
4 1.00 285 4.95
Figure 5 average words tc a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. doily
Phone NO 2-4786
FOR SALE
NICE FURNITURE, dishes, objects d'art
are waiting for you at the Darwin's
House of Values-2930 S.,State. B9
HI FI--Garrard RO-88 changer, Picker-
ing U-388T cartridge. Electro-Voice
12TRXB speaker in Argos enclosure,
Knight 30 W Mono. integrated Amp-
Pre-Amp. Will, sell together or sepa-
rately. Sacrifice. Leave message for
Jim at NO 2-9890. B4
FOR SALE-Antique four-poster bed.
Call HU 3-5973.
WANTED TO RENT
WOULD LIKE TO RENT a house or
apt from Jan 1-July 1, 1964, while
attending the U of M as a Post-DoO-
toral Fellow in College Administra-
tion. Havethree daughters. Ref-
erences furn'd. Write, Robert A.
Bohannon, 1015 N. Juliette, Man-
hattan, Kansas. L
PERSONAL
LOST-One DAT and Strong aptitude
test. If found and completed, please
return to owner, or owner will flunk
0557 and you wouldn't want that to
happen, would you. (I hope)
Searchingly, the owner
Fe'
THE RESIDENTS of 706 E. University
proudly announce the birth at 4:15
a.m. July 5 of one pure white kitten,
Write Box 105 Michigan Daily with
suggestions for kitten's name.
IT IS NOT A FACT that 42% of the
people in the U.S. have blue eyes or
any related shades. The tendency to-
ward particular coloration is a rela-
tively unexplored field, and is there-
fore, unknown. (According to re-
search done by the Medical and Gen-
eral Libraries' staff). F9
DEAR 3-WEEK-OLD festering Cy,
If we continue like this, the con-.
sequences may be premature. Besides,
Just think what might happen if
Jon finds outs
Furtively, ch F11
IN RESPONSE to the "Kitten-Naming
Contest"-the following entries hve
been made:
1) Call her anything, but don't call
her late for dinner. (Note: there is
an assumption here that the "it" is
a she.)
2) Call her/him Puss-the cat in
"Puss and Boots" was white.
3) If she's a girl, call her "Kitty
Co-ed"-after all, she was born on
E. University St. (whatever that's
supposed to mean.)
4) If you're one who likes oppo-
sites, call it Blackie-that would be
hard to figure out. ,
5) Or call him/her "Guess." Then
when people asked the cat's name,
just ,say "Guess". and you'll have
more fun listening to their replies.
Incidently, we eagerly await further
responses so that we will be able to
make reasonably objective choice.
ch PF
BIKES AND SCOOTERS
'63 VESPA BS-1000 mi., luggage rack,'
crash bars, per.cond. NO 5-0869.Z2
HONDA of Ann Arbor
1906 Packard Road
665-9281
Z2
BUSINESS SERVICES
SALESMEN to make loans to college
students with which to buy life in-
surance. 25-35 married. 2 yrs. college
credit. No experience preferred. Write
Box 2, Michigan Daily. J
FOR RENT
NEED AN APT, for the fall? We've got
al sizes, styles, and prices. Call 663-
0511 or 668-8723 9 a.m. till midnight.
C18
ATTRACTIVE-Furnished, 4-rooms and
bath. 2nd floor of duplex. Clean and
reasonable. Phone NO 2-2625.n
NEW 2 BDRM. APTS. for fall-Furn'd.,
carpeted, balconies. For 3 or 4. Call
663-0511 or 668-8723 9 a.m. till mid-
night. 019
GIRL TO SHARE campus-two bed-
room, nicely furnished. 721 S. Forest.
Call NO 2-9188. C2
BETWEEN hospitals and Rckham, ef

ficiency with separate kitchen and
bath. Summer and fall. $75. NO 2-
0070. 07
SUMMER ONLY
Block from campus. Spacipus newly
decorated apartment to sublet 2
bedrooms, jalousied porch. $110/mo.
(another for $70/mo.) NO 3-7268.
C11
HURON TOWERS APARTMENTS
2200 FULLER ROAD
One, two and three bedroom apts. Mod-
erate rentdls include large rooms, air
conditioning, swimming pool, parking
and many other fine features. Low per
person cost for multiple occupants.
Call NO 3-0800 or stop by our rental
office, on premises, to see model apts.
C4
CAMPUS APTS.
REDUCED
SUMMER RENTS
Remodeled and completely furn'd. for
1, 2. 3, 4 persons. $50-90/mo. Few still
available for fal. Single student only.
NO 5-9405.G
BARGAIN CORNER

CLASSIFIEDS

f

d

I

=:,1

10.00 to 16.50

RENT A CAR
$5.00/24 hr. day
Plus 5c per mile
For info call NO 5-3112
NORTH BROS.
LEASING INC.
3250 Washtenow Aver
(Inn America)'

Bermudas

Order
Your
Subscription
Today"
NO 2-34

Were

8.50 to 8.95
9.50 to 10.95
11.95 to 13.95
15.95

Now
6.95
7.95
9.95
11.95

Major League Standings

AMERICAN LEAGUE

NATIONAL

Neckwear

New York
Chicago
Boston
Minnesota
Baltimore
Cleveland
Los Angeles
Kansas City
Detroit
Washington

w
50
47
44
45
47
44
41
36
35
30

L
31
38
37
38
40
40
46
44
47
56

Pct.
.617
.553
.543
.542
.540
.524
.471
.439
.427
.349

GB
5
6
6
6
7
12
14 ?/2
151f
2212

Los Angeles
San Francisco
Chicago
St. Louis
Cincinnati
Milwaukee
Pittsburgh
Philadelphia
Houston
New York

LEAGUE
W L Pet.
50 33 .602
48 37 .565
45 37 .549
46 38 .548
45 40 .529
43 40 .518
41 42 .494
40 44 .476
33 54 .379
29 55 .345

GB
3
4%
414
6
7
9
10%
19
21Y2

Were
2.50

3.50 to 4.50
5.00
6.50 to 7.50

Now
1.64
2.64
3.64
4.64
this sale

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
(No games scheduled)
TODAY'S GAMES
Boston at Minnesota (n)
(Only game scheduled)

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
(No games scheduled)
. TODAY'S GAMES
Los Angeles at New York (n)
Houston at Pittsburgh (n)
San Francisco at Philadelphia (n)
Chicago at Cincinnati
(Only games scheduled)

i

U,

Other furnishings itenis on

include robes, hose, jackets, pajamas,
underwear, etc., reduced 25% to 50%

RENT A TV THIS SUMMER

Special Offer!
Ptcihr ,hCVLxT (!l hr" 10

l

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Yours Now !

:

I

11

11

I

11

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